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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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22 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I planted 21 red potatoes and 300 onion sets yesterday.  

 

300 onion sets don't sound like a lot when you're sitting in your kitchen in January ordering.  

 

It's different on April 8th when you're actually planting them. 😂

At that quantity, it's almost worth looking into a vacuum or vibrating seeding machine!

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Joseph Lofthouse is a radical renegade farmer.

It doesn't get any cheaper or easier or faster than this!!!

You can probably find a free piece of PVC.

 

 

 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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2 hours ago, Shelby said:

I planted 21 red potatoes and 300 onion sets yesterday.  

 

300 onion sets don't sound like a lot when you're sitting in your kitchen in January ordering.  

 

It's different on April 8th when you're actually planting them. 😂

 

At the risk of being completely "corny" - that's what friends are for  :) 

 

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4 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

Joseph Lofthouse is a radical renegade farmer.

It doesn't get any cheaper or easier or faster than this!!!

You can probably find a free piece of PVC.

 

Nifty notion. I'd seen a couple of his seed-saving articles on the Mother Earth News website, but didn't put the pieces together until I'd Googled him.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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1 minute ago, chromedome said:

articles on the Mother Earth News website

 

Yes, he has some good articles.

He is or was active on a little known forum that still exists.

That's how I got to know him.

He has sent me seeds in the past.

Joseph Lofthouse, Landrace Gardener

 


~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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7 hours ago, Shelby said:

I planted 21 red potatoes and 300 onion sets yesterday.  

 

300 onion sets don't sound like a lot when you're sitting in your kitchen in January ordering.  

 

It's different on April 8th when you're actually planting them. 😂

It's also easy to plant 40 feet of bush beans in the spring, but then dealing with the resulting quantity of beans is something else. One's enthusiasm and optimism are endless but one's energy is not. I don't think I've learned that particular lesson yet.

 

I am still guilty (see above) of buying a lot of strawberries or mangos to make jam, but when I'm confronted by the task my zeal is much reduced.  In the case of mangos, they require some days to fully ripen on the counter so there's a little time to get used to the idea. But strawberries wait for no man (or woman).

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

 

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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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4 hours ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

 But strawberries wait for no man (or woman).

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

 

 

If for jam feeezing is always a viable option :)   (Word Rake master would slap me - why did I say "always:)


Edited by heidih (log)

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FWIW,

If all goes well.

Here's a list of most of what I'll be planting this year...80+ things

It seems like a lot for this smallholding microholding, but some will be just a few plants.

Good King Henry (Perennial)

Caucasian Mountain “Spinach” (Perennial)
Sea Kale (Perennial)

Turkish Rocket (Perennial)

Red Welsh Bunching Onion (Perennial) (Start Inside)

Hardy Kiwi (Perennial)

Mary Washington Asparagus (Perennial)

Common Chives (Perennial) (To Increase Stock) (Start Inside)

Common Thyme (Perennial) (To Increase Stock)

Garlic Chives (Perennial) (Start Inside) (To Increase Stock)

Evergreen Hardy Bunching Scallions (Perennial) (Start Inside)

White Spear Scallions (Perennial) (Start Inside)

Edible Common Reed (Non-Invasive Variety) (Perennial) (Bog)

Edible Cattail (Perennial) (Bog)

Edible Daylilies (Perennial) (Bog)

Watercress (Perennial)

Rosa Canina Rosehip Rose (Perennial)

Black Mulberry (Perennial)

French Patience Dock (Rumex Patienta) (Perennial)

Crimson Rhubarb (Perennial)

Korean Wild Celery (Dystaena takesimana ) (Perennial)

Common Oregano (Perennial) (To Increase Stock)

Hardy Lavender (Pseudo-Perennial)

Provider Bush Green Beans (Succession Planted) (Inoculate)
Scarlet Runner Pole Beans (Inoculate)

Haricot Tarbais Cassoulet Pole Bean (Inoculate)

Aprovecho Select Fava Bean (Inoculate)

Alderman Shell Peas (Inoculate)
Little Leaf Pickling Cucumbers
Mexican Sour Gherkin
(Mouse Melon)

Claytonia Greens (Autumn Planted)

Nozaki Early Napa Cabbage (Autumn Planted)

Golden Purslane

Strawberry “Spinach” (Self-Sows Easily)

Little Gem Pearl Romaine Lettuce

Mesclun Mix

Red Orach (Self-Sows Easily)

Perpetual “Spinach” (Leaf Beet)

Red Malabar “Spinach”

New Zealand “Spinach” (Tetragonia)

Jaluv An Attitude Chile (Start Inside)
Matchbox Chile (Start Inside)

Baby Cayenne Chile (?) (Old Seed) (Start Inside)

Baby Pequin Chile (Start Inside)

Korean Kimchi Chile (Start Inside)

Stocky Red Roaster Sweet Pepper (Start Inside)

Early Jalapeno Chile (Start Inside)

Ring-O-Fire Cayenne Chile (Start Inside)

Thai Tiny Chile (Start Inside)

Rooster Spur Chile

Thai Hot Chile

Prik Kee Noo Suan (Rat’s Turd) (Thai) Chile

Thai Sun Chile

Small Wiri Wiri Chile

Grandma Brown’s Beefsteak Tomato *

* (Named After My Maternal Grandmother) (Start Inside)

Sweet Cherriette Tomato (Start Inside)

Mountain Magic Tomato (Old Seed) (Start Inside)

Matt's Wild Cherry Tomato (Start Inside)

Santa Maria Paste Tomato (Start Inside) (Old Seed)

Mexico Midget Tomato (Notorious Poor Germinator) (Old Seed)

Husky Cherry Red Tomato*

* (Two Purchased Seedlings) (Would like to cross with Matt’s Wild Cherry)

Purple Valley Hulless Barley

Streaker Hulless Oats

Sin Et Pheel Ancient Hulless Wheat (If Seed Arrives)

Hells Canyon Millet

Golden Bantam 12-Row Corn

Red's Red Sweet Syrup Sorghum

Opopeo Amaranth (7 Foot Tall Grain Amaranth)

Empress of India Nasturtiums

Otto's Brush Creek Ground Cherry *

* (Self-Sows Easily) (Startt Inside)

Cape Gooseberry (?) (Self-Sows Easily) (Start Inside)

Chinese Lantern Gigantea (Self-Sows Easily) (Start Inside)

Zloty Lan Chamomile (Self-Sows Easily)

Common Sugar Beet (Non-GMO)

Globe Basil

Common Parsley

Common Marjoram

True Garlic Seed (?) (Start Inside)

Common Alfalfa (Non-GMO)

Oxheart Carrot

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~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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8 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

FWIW,

If all goes well.

Here's a list of most of what I'll be planting this year...80+ things

It seems like a lot for this smallholding microholding, but some will be just a few plants.

Good King Henry (Perennial)

Caucasian Mountain “Spinach” (Perennial)
Sea Kale (Perennial)

Turkish Rocket (Perennial)

Red Welsh Bunching Onion (Perennial) (Start Inside)

Hardy Kiwi (Perennial)

Mary Washington Asparagus (Perennial)

Common Chives (Perennial) (To Increase Stock) (Start Inside)

Common Thyme (Perennial) (To Increase Stock)

Garlic Chives (Perennial) (Start Inside) (To Increase Stock)

Evergreen Hardy Bunching Scallions (Perennial) (Start Inside)

White Spear Scallions (Perennial) (Start Inside)

Edible Common Reed (Non-Invasive Variety) (Perennial) (Bog)

Edible Cattail (Perennial) (Bog)

Edible Daylilies (Perennial) (Bog)

Watercress (Perennial)

Rosa Canina Rosehip Rose (Perennial)

Black Mulberry (Perennial)

French Patience Dock (Rumex Patienta) (Perennial)

Crimson Rhubarb (Perennial)

Korean Wild Celery (Dystaena takesimana ) (Perennial)

Common Oregano (Perennial) (To Increase Stock)

Hardy Lavender (Pseudo-Perennial)

Provider Bush Green Beans (Succession Planted) (Inoculate)
Scarlet Runner Pole Beans (Inoculate)

Haricot Tarbais Cassoulet Pole Bean (Inoculate)

Aprovecho Select Fava Bean (Inoculate)

Alderman Shell Peas (Inoculate)
Little Leaf Pickling Cucumbers
Mexican Sour Gherkin
(Mouse Melon)

Claytonia Greens (Autumn Planted)

Nozaki Early Napa Cabbage (Autumn Planted)

Golden Purslane

Strawberry “Spinach” (Self-Sows Easily)

Little Gem Pearl Romaine Lettuce

Mesclun Mix

Red Orach (Self-Sows Easily)

Perpetual “Spinach” (Leaf Beet)

Red Malabar “Spinach”

New Zealand “Spinach” (Tetragonia)

Jaluv An Attitude Chile (Start Inside)
Matchbox Chile (Start Inside)

Baby Cayenne Chile (?) (Old Seed) (Start Inside)

Baby Pequin Chile (Start Inside)

Korean Kimchi Chile (Start Inside)

Stocky Red Roaster Sweet Pepper (Start Inside)

Early Jalapeno Chile (Start Inside)

Ring-O-Fire Cayenne Chile (Start Inside)

Thai Tiny Chile (Start Inside)

Rooster Spur Chile

Thai Hot Chile

Prik Kee Noo Suan (Rat’s Turd) (Thai) Chile

Thai Sun Chile

Small Wiri Wiri Chile

Grandma Brown’s Beefsteak Tomato *

* (Named After My Maternal Grandmother) (Start Inside)

Sweet Cherriette Tomato (Start Inside)

Mountain Magic Tomato (Old Seed) (Start Inside)

Matt's Wild Cherry Tomato (Start Inside)

Santa Maria Paste Tomato (Start Inside) (Old Seed)

Mexico Midget Tomato (Notorious Poor Germinator) (Old Seed)

Husky Cherry Red Tomato*

* (Two Purchased Seedlings) (Would like to cross with Matt’s Wild Cherry)

Purple Valley Hulless Barley

Streaker Hulless Oats

Sin Et Pheel Ancient Hulless Wheat (If Seed Arrives)

Hells Canyon Millet

Golden Bantam 12-Row Corn

Red's Red Sweet Syrup Sorghum

Opopeo Amaranth (7 Foot Tall Grain Amaranth)

Empress of India Nasturtiums

Otto's Brush Creek Ground Cherry *

* (Self-Sows Easily) (Startt Inside)

Cape Gooseberry (?) (Self-Sows Easily) (Start Inside)

Chinese Lantern Gigantea (Self-Sows Easily) (Start Inside)

Zloty Lan Chamomile (Self-Sows Easily)

Common Sugar Beet (Non-GMO)

Globe Basil

Common Parsley

Common Marjoram

True Garlic Seed (?) (Start Inside)

Common Alfalfa (Non-GMO)

Oxheart Carrot

WOW!

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1,600 seeds planted tonight.Sugar beets and scallions.

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~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Managed to pot up the bullhorn pepper I planted this year and move it, the summer before's bullhorn and my curry tree under protection right before our first frost of the winter. Hope I got enough roots for the bullhorn to survive. It will be interesting to see if the one that's a year older makes it through a second winter - it's quite a tree.

 

I'll probably try some winter crops like broccoli and garlic but my luck in previous winters has been poor.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Aurora peppers are about 4 inches from seed

 

Poblano the same

 

Oddly enough, NONE of the pepper seeds we saved on our own (Padron, Shisito) sprouted...

 

Tomatoes have just popped and gone under the light.

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2 hours ago, TicTac said:

Oddly enough, NONE of the pepper seeds we saved on our own (Padron, Shisito) sprouted.

 

Were the fruits they were harvested from fully ripe?

Full ripeness is a requirement for viable chile pepper seed.


~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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re: sugar beets

FWIW, 

The sugar beets are for an experiment in making fish hydrolyze.

Fish hydrolyze is a fermented fish (probably carp in my case) fertilizer that differs from fish emulsion in that it's not cooked.

Fish, kelp, and molasses (or other sugar source.)

Molasses is recommended because it helps mask the odor.

But molasses can be expensive...dark brown sugar is a decent substitute.

Anyway, I'm planning to extract juice from sugar beets via an Acme commercial juicer to make my own molasses.

The pulp and tops are a good carbon crop.

Sugar beets and tops are also edible just as any other beet....best when relatively young.

 

 


~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

My outdoor peas just germinated!  They were not there last night.

 

 

"We blithely speak of Nature's laws,

but do things have a natural cause?

Black earth turned to yellow crocus

is undiluted hocus-pocus."

    ----- Piet Hein, from his Gruks

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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On 4/12/2019 at 10:09 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

Were the fruits they were harvested from fully ripe?

Full ripeness is a requirement for viable chile pepper seed.

That I cannot comment on, unfortunately.  My guess however is that might have been part of the culprit. 

 

Question for @dcarch (saw him doing it) and others who use this method - I would think that after using a seedling tray (36) the next step might be some plastic cups (perhaps their final place of rest prior to being put outside).  Are you putting any material at the bottom to provide some drainage, or all soil?

 

Just put 9 varieties of tomato seeds (all but 2 we saved ourselves) into another 36 cell trey, so far a much better germination rate than the preserved pepper seeds.

 

1.25 CY of high % earthworm castings organic mix arrived today for the newly expanded 9x16 bed.  Now the real fun (manual soil integration) begins!

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6 hours ago, TicTac said:

Question for @dcarch (saw him doing it) and others who use this method - I would think that after using a seedling tray (36) the next step might be some plastic cups (perhaps their final place of rest prior to being put outside).  Are you putting any material at the bottom to provide some drainage, or all soil?

 

My method is very simple.

Cheap soft drink plastic cups. I use a soldering iron to burn a few hole on the bottom and fill the cups with fine potting soil. Seems to drain very well.

dcarch

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On Saturday I went to my Dad's place down in Pennsylvania, about 19 miles away, and got some wild cattails and wild daylilies.

It seemed like a wonderful idea until I had to dig the holes for the 5 gallon "bog" pails that I made. LOL shock2.gif

I surrounded the cattails with the daylilies in the pails

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~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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So jealous about the asparagus.  I think our farm asparagus from up the valley will be another couple of weeks seeing it has been so darn cool.   BUT, I did see the first humming bird visiting our feeders...need to make new feeding liquid for them.

Due to the cool temps, my little arugula plants are the same size as they were two weeks ago.  Peas are poking up.

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Seeds sown tonight...256 chile pepper and 962 Mary Washington asparagus.

Seeds in the fridge stratifying...Good King Henry (Blitum Bonus-Henricus) and Caucasian "Spinach" (Hablitzia Tamnoides)

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~Martin :)

I try to find the good food in every situation!

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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On 4/8/2019 at 8:45 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

If I wanted to safely sanitize the soil capsules for my Click & Grow, is there a way to do it?

 

How hot do you think you could they could stand?

 

Pressure cooker = autoclave = sterilizer..could they take that?

 

If not you could sous vide them at 180F for a day..

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On 4/16/2019 at 10:29 AM, Shelby said:

Just took a walk around the gardens.  

 

Asparagus is up!  Be ready to eat in a few days.  I can't wait.

 

IMG_6129.JPG.1ad0ef7c4553bbebade6cec529497967.JPG

 

Also up are some potatoes and many many onions.

 

 

What I have done.

 

I use a large sheet of  clear greenhouse plastic to cover the asparagus plot early in the spring. The sun warms up the soil, and I can get two to three weeks earlier asparagus.

 

dcarch

 

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2 hours ago, gfweb said:

How hot do you think you could they could stand?

 

Pressure cooker = autoclave = sterilizer..could they take that?

 

If not you could sous vide them at 180F for a day..

 

I was thinking of the CSO.

 

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