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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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On 2/18/2019 at 11:15 PM, kayb said:

 

Straying from the topic, but...

 

I rarely ever wear the things any more, either. I THINK I still own a pair or two.

 

Guess I'll have to go to the strip-off-the-plastic-supermarket-bag method.

 

 

If you've got worn out cotton tee-shirts, they will work better than cut plastic strips which are 1. not stretchable and 2. not breathable. Just sayin'

 

And Thank the Good Lord nobody has to wear those hateful garments anymore! 

 

I still have some in my drawers as well, but I could not be paid a lot of money to put them on again.


> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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When I was a youngster, working out in Saskatchewan as a security guard, I wandered into the truckstop one night to refill my thermos with coffee (it was -42 C, IIRC, and hot coffee was a must for outdoor patrolling). While I was wandering the aisles, I was startled to see - in among the Playboy-logo air fresheners and mirrored stick-ons of unclad/shapely females - boxes of nylons boldly labeled as "Man-T-Hose." 

 

Apparently truckers wore them in the seriously cold weather as an under-layer beneath their more conventional winter warms. I was both amazed and amused. :)

  • Haha 4

"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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Joe Namath was a well know football player who wore them  I think he even modeled a pair for an ad.

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5 minutes ago, IowaDee said:

Joe Namath was a well know football player who wore them  I think he even modeled a pair for an ad.

 

A sad day in American history. 

 

But now we have a different story, and we are all going to have to go to stashed pantyhose we never wear anymore or old T-shirt strips, which work just about as well to hold up garden vines.

 

Good riddance! 🙂

 

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Back on track...

 

;)

 

Got my 2 x 4 'grow tent' setup and will have my 80W LED hanging shortly.  Only thing I still have to purchase is a little fan.

 

Procured 2 x 36 cell 'self watering' seedling trays, so 72 plants should more than suffice!

 

Have been reading a lot about utilizing cold temps to strengthen the plants, very interesting stuff (and counter intuitive to what we have been led to believe!).

 

I think next weekend I will get the seeds in the 'soil-less' organic growing medium, on top of a heat vent (the only time they REQUIRE heat) and covered in some plastic wrap.

 

Exciting stuff - new to growing from seed (*ahem*, least veggies, that is :P)

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@TicTac Nice...  Do your seedling trays have a humidity dome? If not, maybe consider a humidifier for your tent as it can be really dry right now - my tent had a RH of about 30%, which is horrible for just about everything except for ripening, ahem, certain flowers, so I have a humidifier attached to an Arduino and RH sensor to keep humidity about 70% while starting my seeds...  Once everything gets going, I'll dial the humidity down to 50-60%...

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@KennethT - Interesting feedback - thank you.  Are you suggesting that past sprouting (with the plastic wrap, that should maintain humidity until they emerge) I will have to be cautious, even if I keep it moist w spray bottle?

 

I do not have a humidity dome...I have read about people using plastic wrap to create a tent...

 

If I am keeping the medium moist and the seeds sprayed, is it still necessary? 

 

This is certainly going to be a learning experience for me - but I am excited to see what happens.

 

Also plan on using the tent post seedlings transplant to grow some other edibles (ordered some Chinese greens) as well.

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Plastic wrap is ok - anything that keeps in the moisture... otherwise, when it's so dry out, the surface dries out pretty quickly - so it just makes it so you don't have to spray 5x a day.  A lot of pro growers germinate their seeds in a humidor - many times, a rolling cart with shelves that can be sealed and humidity/temp controlled.

 

I've typically read that you want 90-100% humidity prior to germination, then once sprouted, I think 70% RH is good so they don't get too much shock - the problem is that seedlings don't have a root system to deal with lots of transpiration which is needed with low humidity, so in order to not stress teh plant out, a higher humidity mitigates the need for lots of transpiration.

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I suppose I will have to purchase a humidity reader then - great info, Ken - appreciate it.

 

I will do the plastic wrap method prior to germination and then (at the very least) place a water container near the fan in the tent -

 

My guess is that my kids will love this project and we will be down there a few times a day checking in.

 

Question which you may know, Ken - with LED grow lights, are 'special' grow glasses required, or would regular high quality sun glasses suffice?

 

Cheers.

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It doesn't hurt to have one of those cheap $7 temp/humidity readers you find on Amazon - if you have kids, it's a "fun" project to check humidity and if it's too dry, mist away!  Also, in the tent, a cheap way to raise humidity is to hang wet towels from the ceiling or even better, blow a fan on them.

 

Most LED grow lights produce no UV, unless they say that they are supposed to make UV.  Not only that, but an 80W LED isn't that bright - I have a 200W one in the middle of my living room hanging from the ceiling shining down on my lime tree... only one person (who everyone thinks is hypersensitive) ever remarked about it - she said "arrgghh... it's burning my retinas!", but really, it's not THAT bright... now the monster I have in my grow tent is another story!  It's a 550W beast that puts out almost 1400 umol/m2/s!!!! (translation, it's really really bright).

 

Sometimes people will use special grow glasses when using the magenta colored LED lights - the purpose of which is to try to normalize the color which makes inspection (looking for pests, nutrient deficiency, etc) easier... but not needed for normal pruning, trimming harvest, etc unless you're bothered by it.

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Several horticulturists favor zip bags. Closed till grminated then slowly wope kore and m0re. They sell those big ones to store your sweaters in. 

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zip lock bags work well... anything to keep the humidity in, really...

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The Sun Will Come Out, Tomorrow

Today, Everyday, ---- Just flip a switch.

 

It has become easy to build your own high power LED grow light. COB 110vac LEDs are not expensive. No more need to have complicated power drivers..

I made 4 COB LED grown lights, each with two 150 Watt chips.

Cooling fans and heat sinks and switches. Plus Acrylic rods for focusing.

1,200 Watts of light. So incredibly bright. It's like having my own sun! 

408008819_LEDgrowlight2.thumb.jpg.b717cb40c4934a30fd5a59d3a4bad0bb.jpg

 

92223238_LEDgrowlight.thumb.JPG.f438bfee2a0bd84de48d376e1517aa08.JPG

315172134_LEDgrowlightc.thumb.jpg.26a07f36dfd89892b34d6e387fa34f7a.jpg

1400073282_LEDgrowlightb.thumb.jpg.86c06bab54a864d170b55dec7d9104c0.jpg

 

With only one light turned on

753341103_LEDgrowlighta.thumb.JPG.55de36f6dc691de27919aecbcc0122a1.JPG

 

No, nothing medicinal or recreational. 9_9

474215897_LEDgrowlightd.thumb.jpg.21baeba51b2b744af4d7505e7835c9e4.jpg

 

dcarch

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@dcarch Very nice!  You probably don't need to verify for seedlings, but rather than looking at it from a brightness scale, the best thing to do is to get a PAR sensor to check PPFD at plant level.  Apogee makes great, affordable sensors that you can plug into a USB port on your computer and read the value using their free software.

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3 hours ago, TicTac said:

@dcarch - Do you use any eye protection when working under those?

 

There is no need to wear eye protection. LEDs produce no harmful rays. I sometimes wear sunglasses mostly because the glare from the brightness.

 

 

2 hours ago, KennethT said:

@dcarch Where did you get the heatsinks?

 

I was lucky. A guy on eBay was selling those used huge heatsinks. I was searching on ebay and Amazon for a long time.

dcarch

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@TicTac If you're concerned about UV, you need to contact the manufacturer of your light for its spectral output.  I don't know where the statement "most quality LED grow lights produce UV rays" comes from.  Also, I think a lot of articles in MY are written by writers who have no growing experience... much of what I've read from them is filler that is just general information that seems to be regurgitated over and over.

 

Personally, my main grow light does not produce any light below 400nm, and the amount emitted in the region between 400 and 430nm is so low, (and my exposure time is so short - I don't spend that much time hanging out under the light) I'm not concerned about it.

 

I would assume that since @dcarch built his light from COBs himself, he would have access to the spectral output of the COBs and would know whether or not his lights pose any risk to him.... but again, most people don't hang out for long periods of time under their lights, so health risk is minimized by small amounts of exposure... it would be different if you're working in a greenhouse or an indoor farm that utilizes UV - some indoor cannabis farms specifically use large amounts of UV (there are even pro lights you can get that only emit UV) during the last couple weeks of flower as it encourages terpene output - so glasses and sunscreen or cover up is definitely necessary then.

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6 hours ago, TicTac said:

@dcarch - Are you sure about that?  Most quality LED grow lights produce UV rays...

Here is one link which talks about a number of variables...

https://www.maximumyield.com/eye-care-growroom/2/1458

 

Sure, it is possible most LEDs produce UV light, question is what kind of UV  light and how strong. LEDs are monochromatic, almost single frequency (wave) devices. Unless they are specifically UV LED chips, all others are devices using phosphorus  coating to turn LED light into multi-light wave devices. The UV light from these LEDs are very weak. As someone has said, for your eyes to be damaged, you will need to tape the LED to your eyeball.

 

dcarch

 

 

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22 hours ago, dcarch said:

 

Sure, it is possible most LEDs produce UV light, question is what kind of UV  light and how strong. LEDs are monochromatic, almost single frequency (wave) devices. Unless they are specifically UV LED chips, all others are devices using phosphorus  coating to turn LED light into multi-light wave devices. The UV light from these LEDs are very weak. As someone has said, for your eyes to be damaged, you will need to tape the LED to your eyeball.

 

dcarch

 

 

Not sure where you come up with the 'LEDs are monochromatic' bit -

 

My KIND LED Grow bar has multiple color spectrum's....

 

 

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4 hours ago, TicTac said:

Not sure where you come up with the 'LEDs are monochromatic' bit -

My KIND LED Grow bar has multiple color spectrum's....


As far as I know there is no such thing as white LEDs. They all come in different narrow band wave lengths (monochromatic), from IR to UV. 

By modifying LEDs, "white" can be achieved.

dcarch

 


Edited by dcarch (log)

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@TicTac I'm not @dcarch but what I think he meant by that is that within your light bar, each individual LED puts out a single wavelength.  Light bars put out a spectrum by using lots of different types of LEDs.  COBs are similar, but the many different LEDs are packaged within a single unit.

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Looking at the picture of what @dcarch linked where he had the light on in his grow tent, I believe we are comparing different technologies.

 

In his photo, you can see the light is very 'white' (hence the monochromatic comment)...

LED grow light  a.JPG

 

You will notice the light output from one of KIND's LED Grow lights is quite different...far from monochromatic; in fact (it is comprised of different color spectrum's to make up the hue you see below)

maxresdefault.jpg

 

Perhaps with the types of LED's dcarch linked, glasses are not required?  They appear to produce light typical of what a household led 'bulb' would, clearly people do not walk around with specialized glasses in their houses - but perhaps with these 'grow' led lights, eye protection is required?

 

I am mostly curious as to whether 'grow glasses' are simply a marketing ploy (as the lights are in essence just trying to emulate the sun's UV rays) and whether standard high quality 'sun glasses' (which protect against the sun's UV rays) would suffice.

 

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