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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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Yes, that definitely looks like heat/solar stress.

If you can get your hands on some Wando Dwarf Shelling (English) Pea seed—it's a cultivar that's much more tolerant of heat than other pea cultivars.

Looks like Burpee even sells it. https://www.burpee.com/vegetables/peas/pea-wando-prod001145.html


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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Posted (edited)

FWIW,

The new agrarian, utilitarian, contrarian "experimental" organic micro-farmden logo...

What do you think?

DiggingDogFarm2.png


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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10 hours ago, dcarch said:

 

What's the indoor temperature?

Peas like around 70F for growing. Yours look like mine in the summer.

 

dcarch

 

 

Yes, that's why I thought the problem might be heat stress.  It gotten as high as 81F in here.  The peas I'm growing are Kelvedon Wonder.

 

On a related note a different pea seedling has been consumed with white fungus.  Should I rinse everything down with bleach?  I don't think I'll assay any more peas indoors as It's close to time for planting outdoors on the balcony.

 

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16 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

FWIW,

The new agrarian, utilitarian, contrarian "experimental" organic micro-farmden logo...

What do you think?

DiggingDogFarm2.png

 

 

It'd look great on a T-shirt!

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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On 3/19/2019 at 12:15 AM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Most of my English peas are not doing well.  The leaves at the bottom of the plants start to turn brown until the whole plant dies.  All I can think of is that it may be too warm.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

Yeah, I tried for several years to grow peas in Memphis. By the time the ground warms up, the ambient temp is too high. I'm sorry you aren't able to grow peas, and I would love to hear from anyone who can grow peas. What does it take?

 

We all want to know!


> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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I love the new logo, but I can't overcome the urge to want to color it!  Pass the crayons please.

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A "chin-up" for those of you who may feel discouraged when your plants do not look like the picture perfect ones at the garden ceneter - the reality

 

 

mag.JPG

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On 3/20/2019 at 8:45 AM, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

Yeah, I tried for several years to grow peas in Memphis. By the time the ground warms up, the ambient temp is too high. I'm sorry you aren't able to grow peas, and I would love to hear from anyone who can grow peas. What does it take?

 

We all want to know!

Thought I had posted this previously, but don't see it. Forgive me if I have.

 

Plant early. No later than first day of spring. You'll be eating peas by early May, and they'll be gone by early June. Short season, but oh, so good!

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Posted (edited)

These green things seem happy with my DIY LED lights.

Look forward to BLTs on Memorial Day. :B

 

dcarch

 

It's a jungle!

1621639710_tomatoforest.thumb.jpg.6473c6dd22b559300d4f3a32f6633b8b.jpg

 

Most Almost all have blossoms already Many have bloomed.

349382567_tomatoesblossom.thumb.jpg.48dcab92a25fd97da0146817772f2c78.jpg

 

Ground cherries are blooming

545196320_groundcherry.thumb.JPG.0f560e7b561ef6e41344ad5d1423956c.JPG

 

Little okras have blossoms too.

644498576_littleokra.thumb.jpg.f3395a6eb3a58af204ee7437db06e2dc.jpg


Edited by dcarch (log)
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I finally got rid of the last non-edible in the yard!

I sawed the big burning bush off at ground level with an electric chainsaw! devil2.gif

Yay!!! clap.gif

It'll be replaced with productive edibles. yes.gif

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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Posted (edited)

I was awoken at 5 am this morning by the most amazing noise. In my just-awake state it took me a while to work out what it was. We were being battered by the tail of a tropical storm or typhoon. I immediately leapt up to try to rescue the two plants outside my balcony window.

 

My baby lime tree was standing up well to the lashing, so was OK.

 

1020795491_limetree.thumb.jpg.39aafe092471fb27daa42cef2b8c91c5.jpg

 

and my mint was sheltered enough to escape damage. So, no real damage except to my sleep.

 

Some of my neighbours were less lucky. My immediate neighbour lost all the clothing she had hung outside her window to dry. We calculate it's probably flying somewhere over Korea by now!

 

mint.thumb.jpg.0b1867adcc69a54739cc314ec7ff6bfb.jpg

 

 


Edited by liuzhou typos (log)
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@liuzhou How old is that lime tree?  I have a dwarf lime tree (it's a standard lime tree grafted onto dwarf rootstock) and I love it!  How do you keep your tree from getting root rot issues?

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4 minutes ago, KennethT said:

@liuzhou How old is that lime tree?  I have a dwarf lime tree (it's a standard lime tree grafted onto dwarf rootstock) and I love it!  How do you keep your tree from getting root rot issues?

 

I think it's about 5 or 6 years old. I grew it from a pip I almost swallowed in a gin and tonic one day. It sits on the ledge outside my balcony year round. Never had any root rot issues. Neither has the  tree! 😄

 

My only real regret is that it probably won't grow any larger being in that bucket, but I have no outdoor place to plant it. Also, it will never fruit here as its only potential mate is miles away in Vietnam! 😢

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23 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

My only real regret is that it probably won't grow any larger being in that bucket, but I have no outdoor place to plant it. Also, it will never fruit here as its only potential mate is miles away in Vietnam! 😢

Strange - mine flowers/fruits all the time, and it's all by its lonesome - I think it's the only NYC lime tree in existence...  Is yours a true lime (small fruits with seeds) or a Bearss lime (sometimes called Persian lime or Tahitian lime - the standard lime you would find in the US/Europe which is actually a cross of a true lime and a lemon, which is larger than a true lime, has a thicker skin (although I find it still doesn't take insults well)  and has no seeds)?  I don't know about true limes, but Bearss limes are self-pollinating - they don't even need insects!

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2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Strange - mine flowers/fruits all the time, and it's all by its lonesome - I think it's the only NYC lime tree in existence...  Is yours a true lime (small fruits with seeds) or a Bearss lime (sometimes called Persian lime or Tahitian lime - the standard lime you would find in the US/Europe which is actually a cross of a true lime and a lemon, which is larger than a true lime, has a thicker skin (although I find it still doesn't take insults well)  and has no seeds)?  I don't know about true limes, but Bearss limes are self-pollinating - they don't even need insects!

 

It is a Vietnamese lime, so small with seeds.

 

I may be wrong about its fruit bearing ability - I'm no expert.

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2 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

It is a Vietnamese lime, so small with seeds.

 

I may be wrong about its fruit bearing ability - I'm no expert.

I love those small limes.  I keep thinking about changing out my Bearss lime for a true lime tree (I only have space for 1) but I don't have the heart to kill my tree - it's probably about 10 years old by now, if not a little older...

 

FWIW, I think most citrus trees don't start flowering/fruiting until they're about 5 years old... so there may be hope yet!

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8 minutes ago, KennethT said:

FWIW, I think most citrus trees don't start flowering/fruiting until they're about 5 years old... so there may be hope yet!

I just did a quick check with the producer of the dwarf tree I have (fourwindsgrowers.com) - they say that most citrus won't flower or fruit if they don't get enough direct light.  In a shaded space they will produce foliage, but not flower.

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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, KennethT said:

I just did a quick check with the producer of the dwarf tree I have (fourwindsgrowers.com) - they say that most citrus won't flower or fruit if they don't get enough direct light.  In a shaded space they will produce foliage, but not flower.

 

Mine sits in direct tropical sunlight for 10 months of the year!

Thanks for checking, though!


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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Getting the veggies beds ready for planting.  Some spring onions, beet, carrots, peas and greens are already in.

The herb garden.  We'll have chives next week if the warm weather keeps coming.

DSC02965.thumb.jpg.41808ba696a6f5d1775a3b930a9546cd.jpgDSC02966.thumb.jpg.72d2a579d6b173abb1ea4b27d95b6892.jpg

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On 3/26/2019 at 10:44 PM, DiggingDogFarm said:

I finally got rid of the last non-edible in the yard!

I sawed the big burning bush off at ground level with an electric chainsaw! devil2.gif

Yay!!! clap.gif

It'll be replaced with productive edibles. yes.gif

 

A friend is of the same philosophy in terms of yard management.

She says...."If you can't eat it, delete it!"

Love it!

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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Part of my grow light set-up.

Nothing fancy.

Simple, cheap, and utilitarian.

Eight fluorescent lights.

The shelf is 12 inches wide and 8 feet long.

Plenty of room for my plants. I don't like them getting big inside.

It just means more work.

When the garden soil is warm enough they'll take off like a rocket!

I can move the lights and shelf up and down via chains
It's okay for seedlings to touch fluorescent lights.

I keep the seedlings as close to the lights as possible.

GrowLights.jpg

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I've been looking into weed control for our asparagus patch.  Our asparagus is probably at least 13 years old by now and has spread out a lot.  I am always very very very scared to apply herbicides --and thank goodness I looked into the one Ronnie was thinking about using.  Anyway, in researching I've run across people that swear by using either rock salt or table salt.  They sprinkle it all over the patch in early spring before anything emerges.  Anyone have any experience with this?

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1 hour ago, Shelby said:

I've been looking into weed control for our asparagus patch.  Our asparagus is probably at least 13 years old by now and has spread out a lot.  I am always very very very scared to apply herbicides --and thank goodness I looked into the one Ronnie was thinking about using.  Anyway, in researching I've run across people that swear by using either rock salt or table salt.  They sprinkle it all over the patch in early spring before anything emerges.  Anyone have any experience with this?

 

I just asked my friend, who is an accomplished gardener. She hadn't heard of it, but sent me this link to an article on the topic. The article has some very specific notes: that it can work on small scale, but you risk ruining the soil for the rest of the plants if you do it wrong. Here is an excerpt:

 

Quote

Applying salt to weeds must be done extremely carefully so as to avoid damage to nearby vegetation. Use a funnel to direct the saltwater to the weed; this will help keep the solution from splattering. Once you have applied the solution, water any nearby plants well. This will help to mitigate damage and will cause the salt to leach below the root zone of the plants. Caution: A popular question asked by gardeners is “Can I pour salt on the ground to kill weeds?” This is not a good practice, as it can easily damage surrounding vegetation and soil. The salt weed killing method works best if the salt is diluted and applied directly to the weed. 

Read more at Gardening Know How: Salt Recipe For Weeds – How To Use Salt To Kill Weeds https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/using-salt-to-kill-weeds.htm

 

She says she's a big believer in edging, to keep the plants from spreading beyond where they're supposed to be. I don't know whether that would help your situation. It's hard to imagine too much asparagus!

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I would say a big "NO!" to putting salt in/on your soil. It's a sure way to to kill the land.

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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28 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

I just asked my friend, who is an accomplished gardener. She hadn't heard of it, but sent me this link to an article on the topic. The article has some very specific notes: that it can work on small scale, but you risk ruining the soil for the rest of the plants if you do it wrong. Here is an excerpt:

 

 

She says she's a big believer in edging, to keep the plants from spreading beyond where they're supposed to be. I don't know whether that would help your situation. It's hard to imagine too much asparagus!

Yeah I just can't bring myself to curb any asparagus growth.  Thank you and your friend for your help.

12 minutes ago, Toliver said:

I would say a big "NO!" to putting salt in/on your soil. It's a sure way to to kill the land.

I see your point.

 

The internet is a wealth of information....and it's always conflicting it seems like.

 

 I may just have to succumb to using round-up.  At the end of asparagus season we let it all grow up anyway...so .....

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