Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, TicTac said:

Question for @dcarch (saw him doing it) and others who use this method - I would think that after using a seedling tray (36) the next step might be some plastic cups (perhaps their final place of rest prior to being put outside).  Are you putting any material at the bottom to provide some drainage, or all soil?

 

My method is very simple.

Cheap soft drink plastic cups. I use a soldering iron to burn a few hole on the bottom and fill the cups with fine potting soil. Seems to drain very well.

dcarch

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Saturday I went to my Dad's place down in Pennsylvania, about 19 miles away, and got some wild cattails and wild daylilies.

It seemed like a wonderful idea until I had to dig the holes for the 5 gallon "bog" pails that I made. LOL shock2.gif

I surrounded the cattails with the daylilies in the pails

  • Like 4

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So jealous about the asparagus.  I think our farm asparagus from up the valley will be another couple of weeks seeing it has been so darn cool.   BUT, I did see the first humming bird visiting our feeders...need to make new feeding liquid for them.

Due to the cool temps, my little arugula plants are the same size as they were two weeks ago.  Peas are poking up.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seeds sown tonight...256 chile pepper and 962 Mary Washington asparagus.

Seeds in the fridge stratifying...Good King Henry (Blitum Bonus-Henricus) and Caucasian "Spinach" (Hablitzia Tamnoides)

  • Like 2

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/8/2019 at 8:45 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

If I wanted to safely sanitize the soil capsules for my Click & Grow, is there a way to do it?

 

How hot do you think you could they could stand?

 

Pressure cooker = autoclave = sterilizer..could they take that?

 

If not you could sous vide them at 180F for a day..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/16/2019 at 10:29 AM, Shelby said:

Just took a walk around the gardens.  

 

Asparagus is up!  Be ready to eat in a few days.  I can't wait.

 

IMG_6129.JPG.1ad0ef7c4553bbebade6cec529497967.JPG

 

Also up are some potatoes and many many onions.

 

 

What I have done.

 

I use a large sheet of  clear greenhouse plastic to cover the asparagus plot early in the spring. The sun warms up the soil, and I can get two to three weeks earlier asparagus.

 

dcarch

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, gfweb said:

How hot do you think you could they could stand?

 

Pressure cooker = autoclave = sterilizer..could they take that?

 

If not you could sous vide them at 180F for a day..

 

I was thinking of the CSO.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About the Mary Washington asparagus seed from Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company:

The recommendation was to soak the seeds for 24 hours.

Many seeds have germinated in less than one day.

 

About the sugar beet seed from Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company:

I very recently received a letter from them.

"We regret to inform you that the lot of seed you purchased tested positive for GMO contamination."

The cost of the seeds was $3.00 for ~250 seeds....there were actually many more.

They did issue me a $5.00 gift card....but that's not much of a consolation considering the amount of time and effort invested (I sowed the seeds one at a time.) 

The seedlings are now about an inch tall.

  • Like 1

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wild ramp omelet. I'm not sure if these ramps in my two modest patches can be called wild, as I put them together with several trips to the Union Square  Farmer's Market over a few years, planting them when I got them home. They do not propagate well at my low altitude, so I leave the bulbs in the ground and have to be happy with just the leaves, which I greatly enjoy.

HC

IMG_0222.thumb.JPG.64e34e9234f25b8d9794c935ccef513e.JPGIMG_0221.thumb.JPG.edfa6961505ae0aac44d53a0acf46ae4.JPGIMG_0216.thumb.JPG.1cf87e1439965d02864f2ac17f53990e.JPGIMG_0215.thumb.JPG.91a2feec3498981f1fae8fa5e56cd328.JPGIMG_0217.thumb.JPG.1e3592aba5f1204c9e85724278390112.JPG

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK now inspired to plant garlic chive again. Ramps not in this zone. Nice dafs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It never occurred to me that I should share this tip.

 

I sous vide my fingers. That's right, sous vide my fingers.

 

It's cold  to work in my shop and in the garden in the late fall to spring. For a lot of work, gloves can be a problem. So I set my sous vide temperature to about 98F in a pot of water. When my fingers get numb and cold, I just immerse my hands into the hot water for a few seconds, towel them dry, and I am good to go for a while.

 

Numb fingers can be a danger working with tools.

 

dcarch

  • Like 4
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dcarch said:

It never occurred to me that I should share this tip.

 

I sous vide my fingers. That's right, sous vide my fingers.

 

It's cold  to work in my shop and in the garden in the late fall to spring. For a lot of work, gloves can be a problem. So I set my sous vide temperature to about 98F in a pot of water. When my fingers get numb and cold, I just immerse my hands into the hot water for a few seconds, towel them dry, and I am good to go for a while.

 

Numb fingers can be a danger working with tools.

 

dcarch

Wouldn't it be easier to get a space heater that you can use while you're down there for any extended period of time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am talking about working outdoors in the garden and my shop is a detached big leaky two car garage, not insulated.

 

dcarch

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do that at the Garden "old school" and run the coffee pot with just water and dip in. The greenhouse is heated  of course but fingers can remain stiff and v. cold.  Hard to work with delicate seedling wearing gloves. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Speaking of sous vide...

 

I've done some sous vide seed germination...it works a treat.

 

And there's the following, from our friends at Cornell University...

Chart here: Managing Pathogens Inside Seed with Hot Water

And this from OSU...

https://kb.osu.edu/bitstream/handle/1811/84555/1/Moodispaw_Research_Distinction_Thesis.pdf

And this from PSU...

Hot Water Treatment for Tomato and Pepper Seeds

 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
  • Like 4

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

Speaking of sous vide...

 

I've done some sous vide seed germination...it works a treat.

 

And there's the following, from our friends at Cornell University...

Chart here: Managing Pathogens Inside Seed with Hot Water

And this from OSU...

https://kb.osu.edu/bitstream/handle/1811/84555/1/Moodispaw_Research_Distinction_Thesis.pdf

And this from PSU...

Hot Water Treatment for Tomato and Pepper Seeds

 

 

That's fascinating, and never would have occurred to me. My culinary interest in sous vide remains minimal (ducks, runs) but I could see myself eventually picking one up for this kind of use.

 

 

(After which, of course, it would probably see occasional kitchen duty as well...)

  • Like 1

“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/27/2019 at 10:34 PM, dcarch said:

It never occurred to me that I should share this tip.

 

I sous vide my fingers. That's right, sous vide my fingers.

 

It's cold  to work in my shop and in the garden in the late fall to spring. For a lot of work, gloves can be a problem. So I set my sous vide temperature to about 98F in a pot of water. When my fingers get numb and cold, I just immerse my hands into the hot water for a few seconds, towel them dry, and I am good to go for a while.

 

Numb fingers can be a danger working with tools.

 

dcarch

 

If they are pasteurized, you left them in too long

  • Haha 3

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, haresfur said:

 

If they are pasteurized, you left them in too long

 

It's a garden, not a pasture.

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Radish already!  Totally jealous.  It has been so cold here mine haven't changed in size for two weeks.

Do you cook radish?  They are delicious grilled with the green tops on then tossed in a vinaigrette.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

Radish already!  Totally jealous.  It has been so cold here mine haven't changed in size for two weeks.

Do you cook radish?  They are delicious grilled with the green tops on then tossed in a vinaigrette.

I couldn't believe how fast they grew this year.  

 

I'll be honest, radishes are not at the top of my favorite veggie list.  I probably wouldn't even plant them, but Ronnie likes them.  These, however, are very sweet and good.  I was sad we only had 4 to eat last night.  I am intrigued by cooking them.  I will try that.  Thank you!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll try that grilling trick too. I'm not crazy about radishes, but once in a while they can taste good to me. My husband loves them.

 

When my parents bought their first house after WWII, they planted a garden. It included a row or two of radishes. The radishes came up quickly and abundantly, and only then did they learn that neither one liked radishes. Each said, "But I thought YOU liked them!" The gift of the magi. They never planted radishes again.

  • Haha 3

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I LOVE radishes. Will eat them with a bit of butter and some salt. Crackers or toast are nice, but not required.

 

They are also a key element, along with leaf lettuce and green onions, in a wilted lettuce salad (chopped up bacon fried and stirred with its fat into the lettuce/radish/green onion mixture while it's still hot, and then a spritz of wine vinegar). 

 

Radishes are what get me through the spring before tomatoes get ripe. And about now is when I start wanting a ripe tomato so badly I just...can't....stand...it...

 

  • Like 2

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I grow them for the greens. They're the first thing I get from my garden in the spring (well...after the chives, anyway).

 

For cooking purposes, think of the roots as delicate young white turnips and treat them accordingly. They're pretty much interchangeable.

  • Like 4

“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...