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Nancy in Pátzcuaro

Gardening: (2016– )

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I didn't say anything about this when I did it because I wanted to see if it worked first.  We've always had those awful corn ear worms get into our sweet corn.  Most all of the ends were usually gnawed up and then you'd find one of those ugly worms and have to pick it off and squish it.  Ugh.  Anyway, I tried something new this year and it seems to have worked!  Basically the instructions tell you to put 5 drops of corn oil mixed with a BT (Bacillus thuringiensis) on to the silks of the corn just when they start to turn a bit brown.  The oil acts as a barrier to the eggs that the moths lay that turn into the worms.  Adding the BT makes sure to kill the worms as they begin to eat the silks.  

 

I did switch up the instructions a bit. The 5 drop method seemed to fiddly so I took a clean spray bottle and filled it with the corn oil (holds about 19 oz.) along with about a 1/4 tsp. of the BT.  Shake it well.  Do one squirt per ear on the silks that have started to brown.  

 

We've picked 4 ears so far and not a hint of worms.  We will see if that trend continues and I'll update here.

 

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Will be squash overwhelmed the next few days. They are coming! They are coming!

 

dcarch

 

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I am not sure how many I have squirreled away in the vegetable drawer 😲

currently looking for a Mexican zucchini and tomatillo dish to make for dinner because the tomatillos are coming!

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dcarch, I suspect you are related to Giuseppe Arcimboldo.   I have  always wanted some of his prints to hang in my kitchen and now egulleters have  their own version  

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4 hours ago, IowaDee said:

dcarch, I suspect you are related to Giuseppe Arcimboldo.   I have  always wanted some of his prints to hang in my kitchen and now egulleters have  their own version  

 

dcarch :D

 

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On 7/16/2019 at 11:54 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

My first tomatoes are turning red.

 

I came home tonight to letter from the rental agent to please remove the planters from my balcony immediately.

 

Didn't you go through this before?

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2 hours ago, gfweb said:

Didn't you go through this before?

 

Yes.  A couple years ago the owner of the apartment complex objected to two white plastic planters that I had.  She had the rental agent make me get rid of them, which I did eventually.  At that time the renal agent told me the rest of my planters were fine.

 

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I may have whined before that this year's garden is an absolute bust.

My Cherokee Purple plant has three pint-sized tomatoes and my Early Girls maybe 3 to 5...normally 20 or more.  The cherry tomato plants aren't bad. Likewise the cucumbers suck...just three off four plants.  I have given up weeding.

But, you can't keep a good zucchini plant down and my two are producing some lovely ones.  These are a different variety but I like them because not many seeds and nice firm flesh.

And.....never underestimate nor neglect your compost pile....Best produce so far.  This morning I harvested a huge amount of lovely New Zealand spinach.  There's a small tomato plant in there.  The other bin has a large squash plant plus two others 😁

 

Our neighbour got some spinach and cherry tomatoes in exchange for some lovely peaches which my brother's dog was very interested in. DSC03132.thumb.jpg.f2ee39115dca2dce24b641afa8286aba.jpgDSC03133.thumb.jpg.f67ebab13726cd2675f35ce1061f9a71.jpgDSC03123.thumb.jpg.454d71eec2e3b47e79978c24baefc28f.jpgDSC03126.thumb.jpg.7da1277a244cb16a4d0c65474172ad75.jpgDSC03124.thumb.jpg.5f4d707c32cbe45eeee2e4207c790a30.jpgDSC03136.thumb.jpg.ba29e798acb593bece9eb4ec954afb44.jpg

 

 

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49 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

I may have whined before that this year's garden is an absolute bust.

My Cherokee Purple plant has three pint-sized tomatoes and my Early Girls maybe 3 to 5...normally 20 or more.  The cherry tomato plants aren't bad. Likewise the cucumbers suck...just three off four plants.  I have given up weeding.

But, you can't keep a good zucchini plant down and my two are producing some lovely ones.  These are a different variety but I like them because not many seeds and nice firm flesh.

And.....never underestimate nor neglect your compost pile....Best produce so far.  This morning I harvested a huge amount of lovely New Zealand spinach.  There's a small tomato plant in there.  The other bin has a large squash plant plus two others 😁

 

Our neighbour got some spinach and cherry tomatoes in exchange for some lovely peaches which my brother's dog was very interested in. DSC03132.thumb.jpg.f2ee39115dca2dce24b641afa8286aba.jpgDSC03133.thumb.jpg.f67ebab13726cd2675f35ce1061f9a71.jpgDSC03123.thumb.jpg.454d71eec2e3b47e79978c24baefc28f.jpgDSC03126.thumb.jpg.7da1277a244cb16a4d0c65474172ad75.jpgDSC03124.thumb.jpg.5f4d707c32cbe45eeee2e4207c790a30.jpgDSC03136.thumb.jpg.ba29e798acb593bece9eb4ec954afb44.jpg

 

 

Sorry to hear about your issues - what happened this year?  Too hot/cold, rain?

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@Okanagancook - Do you pull the 'shoots' off your tomato plants?  Were those started from seed inside or purchased?

 

I started our tomatoes this year from seed indoors under a good LED.  Stalks are between 1-3" and each plant has well over a dozen 'maters and the grape/cherry varieties are going nuts.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

 

 

Our neighbour got some spinach and cherry tomatoes in exchange for some lovely peaches which my brother's dog was very interested in. DSC03123.thumb.jpg.454d71eec2e3b47e79978c24baefc28f.jpgDSC03124.thumb.jpg.5f4d707c32cbe45eeee2e4207c790a30.jpgDSC03136.thumb.jpg.ba29e798acb593bece9eb4ec954afb44.jpg

 

 

 

3 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

This morning I harvested a huge amount of lovely New Zealand spinach.

 

Yes yes! I recommend New Zealand spinach to everyone. Very tough and prolific. No problem with hot weather.

My NZS completely choke out all weeds.

 

Having NZS for dinner tonight.

 

dcarch

 

 

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2 hours ago, KennethT said:

Sorry to hear about your issues - what happened this year?  Too hot/cold, rain?

Everyone is in the same boat around here.  It was very cool and lots of rain.  The coolness I think it what killed everything.  I mean I have pepper plants that are two inches tall that were raised in the greenhouse (as usual) and planted after the May long weekend.  The fruit set on the wine grapes isn't the greatest either which could be a good thing...less grapes....better quality.

Thanks.

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1 hour ago, TicTac said:

@Okanagancook - Do you pull the 'shoots' off your tomato plants?  Were those started from seed inside or purchased?

 

I started our tomatoes this year from seed indoors under a good LED.  Stalks are between 1-3" and each plant has well over a dozen 'maters and the grape/cherry varieties are going nuts.

 

 

Yes, I pull of the shoots and they were raised by moi as per usual.  Seeds started from seed, in the heated green house with grow lights.  Planted when they were about a foot high. 

It is the lack of heat.  My friend plants around 20 plants every summer and they are a good five feet tall with a plethora of fruit...not this year.

 

Glad to hear yours are going nuts!  

Tomato envy.😁

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28 minutes ago, dcarch said:

 

 

Yes yes! I recommend New Zealand spinach to everyone. Very tough and prolific. No problem with hot weather.

My NZS completely choke out all weeds.

 

Having NZS for dinner tonight.

 

dcarch

 

 

I grow NZS every year but the ones that spontaneously appear in the compost do the best.  I will have to address perhaps a soil issue in the four foot square boxes I use.  They are kept under a shade cloth but those plants don't get nearly as big as the compost plants.

 

I made a delicious salad with the greens today.  I love the texture of NZS.

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14 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Yes, I pull of the shoots and they were raised by moi as per usual.  Seeds started from seed, in the heated green house with grow lights.  Planted when they were about a foot high. 

It is the lack of heat.  My friend plants around 20 plants every summer and they are a good five feet tall with a plethora of fruit...not this year.

 

Glad to hear yours are going nuts!  

Tomato envy.😁

 

Sorry to hear that, happy to send you some tomatoes for some of your stone fruit!!! ;)

 

Also doing Husk Cherries this year, which are booming and the kids are just loving.  Anything sweet that one can grow where little ones can go hand to mouth, is a beautiful thing.

 

 

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This year is my first try at a monsoon garden.  The season started about 2 weeks late here in the SW, but the humidity is up around 50-60% daily now and we are getting scattered infrequent storms.   Monsoon planting is an ancient practice fo the Native people of the SW.   I have some tepary beans and watermelons seeds to try.  The tepary are from Native Seeds Search but the watermelon seeds are hardware storebought and old.  I soaked them to give them a head start.  Fingers crossed.

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Good Ole Kirby!!  keeping an Eye on the Broccoli  

 

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Its good to have Morels

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18 minutes ago, Paul Bacino said:

Good Ole Kirby!!  keeping an Eye on the Broccoli  

 

48373396351_5a3a95c305_o.thumb.jpg.5794a1c4213c29d53e0da543535a5d7b.jpg

 

 

 

When I go to the stores to buy veggies, I noticed that there is not one single insect bite on anything.

That's the reason why I grow my own veggies.

 

Very good looking broccoli!

 

dcarch

 

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41 minutes ago, dcarch said:

 

When I go to the stores to buy veggies, I noticed that there is not one single insect bite on anything.

That's the reason why I grow my own veggies.

 

Very good looking broccoli!

 

dcarch

 

The exact same reason why I only buy organic (our farmer is very proud of his somewhat bitten produce) and subsidize what I can with what we grow ourselves.

 

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1 hour ago, Paul Bacino said:

Good Ole Kirby!!  keeping an Eye on the Broccoli  

 

48373396351_5a3a95c305_o.thumb.jpg.5794a1c4213c29d53e0da543535a5d7b.jpg

 

 

Took me a minute to spot Kirby!

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18 hours ago, TicTac said:

The exact same reason why I only buy organic (our farmer is very proud of his somewhat bitten produce) and subsidize what I can with what we grow ourselves.

 

I had a cab driver once tell me "Screw that organic stuff, I WANT my veggies sprayed. No bugs for me, thank you very much!"

 

I told him "You don't get it...the bugs are always there, the sprays just kill them so they can't crawl back out." The look on his face was priceless.

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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