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Winter squash recipes

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Never had or even seen pumpkin pie IRL before.  But pumpkin is a regular item on the plate for us.  I especially love Pumpkin diced with cumin, S & P some olive oil tossed over the BBQ served on Bruschetta with feta cheese.

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41 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Not a huge fan of pumpkin pie myself - but often make it for others. This recipe from Ideas in Food made a very tolerable pie. 


I tried that one and was happy with the result. I didn't have maple balsamic vinegar so I used some fig balsamic I had at the time instead. Figured it would do with there being only 1 tsp. in the entire pie. I haven't made it since but that's not a commentary on the pie, just haven't made pumpkin pie using any recipe in quite a while.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I grow the New England Sugar Pie pumpkins (from heirloom seeds).  They are lovely!    I used to cook them, several at a time, scrape the pumpkin out, puree it, measure and put into ziplock bag in 2c  portions, then freeze and use for pie or pumpkin bars.    Now, with the wonderful pressure canner....I shall can it!  

With canning, its preferred to cut into chunks, raw, add water and a tad but of salt, top off with water, then pressure can.  I am giddy about trying this!!! 

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-Andrea

 

A 'balanced diet' means chocolate in BOTH hands. :biggrin:

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This recipe is also on my blog.  I served it often when I was catering - I have reduced the recipe to a reasonable size.

I have also prepared it when we used to have block parties - and made 5 gallons on my portable cookers after the '94 earthquake when we had no gas and no power.  I had 4 big propane containers and I fed the neighborhood with chili, stew, this soup and potato soup.

 

Provence Style Pumpkin Soup

An original recipe by Andie, 11/5/97

Two medium-sized pumpkins required. One to cook for the soup, one to hold the soup.  Or you can use any winter squash, Hubbard, Butternut, Turban, etc.
‡‡‡‡‡ ( The “bowl” pumpkin does not have to be a pie or sugar pumpkin.)

Flesh from a medium large sugar or “soup” pumpkin, 3-4 cups, approximately. (PRE-COOKED)
3 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons Herbes de Provence seasoning
1/3 cup shallots, cut into small dice
or 1/2 cup onion
2 tablespoons fresh ginger, grated
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 cup apple jelly
1 quart chicken broth
1 cup heavy cream (or half and half if you want less fat) You can also use sour cream.

Preheat your pan and melt the butter.
Add the shallots and ginger and sauté over medium heat for about 4 minutes.
Add the herbs de Provence and the nutmeg, continue cooking for another minute or so, stirring constantly.
Add the apple jelly and stir until it has melted and blended with the other ingredients.
Pour in the chicken stock and increase the heat until it is simmering,
Reduce the heat and add the pumpkin.

Cook at a low simmer for about 20 minutes.

Either use an immersion blender to puree the contents or remove a cup or two at a time and blend in a blender until it is smooth.
Return pureed soup to the pot, bring to a simmer and whisk in the cream.

While the soup is simmering, cut the top off the second pumpkin, remove the seeds and scrape the inside well.
Pour two quarts of boiling salted water into the pumpkin, swirl it around and pour into sink, allow to drain upside down until ready to use.

Place the pumpkin shell in a bowl to hold it steady, ladle in the soup and serve with croutons, toasted pepitas (pumpkin seeds), sunflower seeds or finely chopped toasted nuts.
‡‡(A pumpkin in which to serve the soup is not necessary, it just makes a nice touch and is a good way to use an extra pumpkin, particularly the non-pie or sugar pumpkins sold at Halloween.)

Variation: If you have onion confit (caramelized onions) on hand, you may substitute them for the shallots or onion in the recipe. Use 2/3s cup and add with the apple jelly, just before adding the chicken stock.

This recipe does not have to be limited to pumpkin. Any winter squash, Hubbard, acorn, butternut, banana, turban or even some of the more exotic squashes, may be used.
I have also made it with sweet potatoes, using the “white” variety.

Croutons to go with the soup.

Cinnamon spice Croutons

Preheat oven to 400° F.

5 slices French or sourdough bread (hearty artisan bread) cut into 1/2 to 3/4 inch cubes.

3 Tablespoons melted butter

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Place bread cubes in a bowl. Add the melted butter and toss to coat cubes evenly.

Sprinkle spices and salt over the cubes and toss until evenly distributed.

Spread evenly on a sheet pan and bake in the oven for 10 to 12 minutes, until crispy and golden brown.

Prepare no more than a day ahead, crisp briefly in hot oven if not crisp when ready to serve.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I only eat pumpkin under financial duress. 

 

I remember them being 25 cents apiece 25 years ago when I was a graduate student.  Admittedly, this was before "organic" anything, at least on the east coast; it was an regular ole' Farmstand.  

 

Anyway, my point is, that is the only thing I truly enjoy about pumpkin:  it's cheap.  

 

However.  I am still cheap, although no longer so broke, so this factor actually goes a long way!

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@andiesenji  Thank you so much for posting that recipe!!!!  Its good to know it can be used with other squashes, as I found an abnormally large Hubbard in my garden and was pondering what to do with it.    The recipe sounds simply delicious!   Thank you!

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-Andrea

 

A 'balanced diet' means chocolate in BOTH hands. :biggrin:

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27 minutes ago, ChocoMom said:

@andiesenji  Thank you so much for posting that recipe!!!!  Its good to know it can be used with other squashes, as I found an abnormally large Hubbard in my garden and was pondering what to do with it.    The recipe sounds simply delicious!   Thank you!

I forgot to add that when we had the Halloween block parties, this was a soup served in mugs.  We used a ladle and CANNING FUNNELS which made filling the mugs much neater with fewer spills.

I was congratulated for the idea by several moms, who often served soups to their families in mugs.  And by the owner of a daycare center who said she had a canning funnel but never thought to use it for anything except canning.

When I was catering, I used them all the time to fill bowls neatly with everything from soup to nuts - especially with dry things that bounce.  

 

P.S.  Hubbard is especially good for soups.  Roasting it first so it caramelizes a bit, produces a much richer flavor.  I used to grow some monsters - I had a band saw to cut them, sometimes cutting across so I had large "wheels" that I grilled on the barbecue instead of in the oven.

 


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I've never had a hubbard squash before. How does it compare to other squashes? Also, how does one open it up, short of using a band saw, axe, power tools, or dynamite? I've somewhat avoided them mostly because I understand they're quite an effort to prepare.

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My father just carried out what I can only call a drive-by squashing.  Once again leaving vegetables from his garden by my front door for me to find when I get home from work.  Last time it was 10 pounds of zucchini and summer squash (made into cake and kimchee).  This time it's 5 small to medium jack-o-lantern style pumpkins. <sigh>

 

Does anyone know of a recipe for this type of pumpkin?  I know the flavor is pretty insipid, but I'm not inclined to let all this free food go to waste.  I might try a Thai style Massaman pumpkin and beef curry for some of it, but I don't think the rest of it would make good puree for pies.

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1 hour ago, Beebs said:

I've never had a hubbard squash before. How does it compare to other squashes? Also, how does one open it up, short of using a band saw, axe, power tools, or dynamite? I've somewhat avoided them mostly because I understand they're quite an effort to prepare.

I have a couple of the very long, very sturdy chef's forks, which are extremely sharp, I stab deep into the squash in several places and roast it in the oven for about 45 minutes.  It should have softened enough by then to cut with a big knife.  Or you can use a clean hand saw.  I have one just for use in the kitchen.  They aren't very expensive and much safer than using an axe.  One of the men at the produce market will split them in half with a machete - after I purchase one.

   Hubbard squashes are available here in all sizes from Acorn squash size to basketball size. And there are Red Hubbards as well as the Blue Hubbards, which are the old variety.  I have used them both and I have never found any difference in the flavor or texture of the flesh.  

Hubbards were favorites with people in earlier times because they kept better and longer than other winter squashes if kept away from damp and heat.  And one squash could easily feed a family with several children.  

And the squash is very nutritious.

In flavor, Hubbards are similar to banana squash, turban squash or butternut and most eating pumpkins. It has very dense flesh, not very watery, which is why it is the longest keeper.  It is great for pies, both sweet and savory and when combined with bacon in a savory pie, is unbeatable.  I use thyme, marjoram and a hint of sage, sprinkled on chopped onions in butter, just barely colored, mixed with the cooked pumpkin and crumbled bacon, you can leave it in bite-sized chunks or mash it a bit but leave some texture.  Turn it into a lightly-baked pie shell from the store - 10 minutes in a 325 oven -  bake it for no more than 20-25 minutes and serve hot.  I generally serve buttered noodles or pasta with just oil and garlic with it.  

 

I don't have a "recipe" per se, I just wing it and it always turns out fine.  


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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49 minutes ago, andiesenji said:

I have a couple of the very long, very sturdy chef's forks, which are extremely sharp, I stab deep into the squash in several places and roast it in the oven for about 45 minutes.  It should have softened enough by then to cut with a big knife.  Or you can use a clean hand saw.  I have one just for use in the kitchen.  They aren't very expensive and much safer than using an axe.  One of the men at the produce market will split them in half with a machete - after I purchase one.

   Hubbard squashes are available here in all sizes from Acorn squash size to basketball size. And there are Red Hubbards as well as the Blue Hubbards, which are the old variety.  I have used them both and I have never found any difference in the flavor or texture of the flesh.  

Hubbards were favorites with people in earlier times because they kept better and longer than other winter squashes if kept away from damp and heat.  And one squash could easily feed a family with several children.  

And the squash is very nutritious.

In flavor, Hubbards are similar to banana squash, turban squash or butternut and most eating pumpkins. It has very dense flesh, not very watery, which is why it is the longest keeper.  It is great for pies, both sweet and savory and when combined with bacon in a savory pie, is unbeatable.  I use thyme, marjoram and a hint of sage, sprinkled on chopped onions in butter, just barely colored, mixed with the cooked pumpkin and crumbled bacon, you can leave it in bite-sized chunks or mash it a bit but leave some texture.  Turn it into a lightly-baked pie shell from the store - 10 minutes in a 325 oven -  bake it for no more than 20-25 minutes and serve hot.  I generally serve buttered noodles or pasta with just oil and garlic with it.  

 

I don't have a "recipe" per se, I just wing it and it always turns out fine.  

 

 

I've always been curious about it, ever since reading about it in one of the Laura Ingalls books. Pa hacked it open with an axe and Ma baked it in the oven, to be scooped out and eaten with sugar & butter. :)

 

Anyway, Googling around has people dropping hubbards on pavement to smash it open. I don't particularly relish this method - not big on road grit in my food. Will try the baking technique. I'll need something long & stabby - DH's power drill should do it, though he probably won't appreciate me repurposing it. 

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3 hours ago, Beebs said:

I've never had a hubbard squash before. How does it compare to other squashes? Also, how does one open it up, short of using a band saw, axe, power tools, or dynamite? I've somewhat avoided them mostly because I understand they're quite an effort to prepare.

 

Does your kitchen have a trebuchet?

 

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6 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Does your kitchen have a trebuchet?

I could never afford anything more elaborate than a slingshot.  But I can dream. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Hubbard is my own favorite squash variety...it usually has loads of flavor.  You may have seen it in the produce section but it would be cut in pieces because Hubbard's are so big. Try it, you’ll like it.

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9 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Does your kitchen have a trebuchet?

 

 

No trebuchet, but I might have a catapult lying around!

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1 minute ago, lindag said:

Hubbard is my own favorite squash variety...it usually has loads of flavor.  You may have seen it in the produce section but it would be cut in pieces because Hubbard's are so big. Try it, you’ll like it.

 

Typically I avoid pre-cut produce but in the case of a Hubbard that is a good idea.  I think I'll keep an eye out for some.  Pity as Hubbard are so pretty whole.

 

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Coincidentally, my mom just emailed me at work that a raccoon ate their fairly large kabocha pumpkin off the vine, leaving nothing but a pile of seeds, guts, and a bit of rind.  Must be one happy, very fat trash panda. O.o

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3 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Is that like a Rachel Ray garbage bowl?

 

Oh, my...I just googled "Rachel Ray garbage bowl" and it is actually a thing!  How do you use yours, Kerry?

 

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Tucker the Airedale ate a gigantic butternut squash that he filched off of the counter. It served as a cleanse of sorts. 

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6 hours ago, Beebs said:

 

I've always been curious about it, ever since reading about it in one of the Laura Ingalls books. Pa hacked it open with an axe and Ma baked it in the oven, to be scooped out and eaten with sugar & butter. :)

 

Anyway, Googling around has people dropping hubbards on pavement to smash it open. I don't particularly relish this method - not big on road grit in my food. Will try the baking technique. I'll need something long & stabby - DH's power drill should do it, though he probably won't appreciate me repurposing it. 

An ice pick works.  I used to use them before I got the wicked sharp and long chef fork (Lamson Earth forged 12 inch). Expensive but it has more than paid for itself.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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On 10/5/2017 at 8:08 PM, ChocoMom said:

I grow the New England Sugar Pie pumpkins (from heirloom seeds).  They are lovely!    I used to cook them, several at a time, scrape the pumpkin out, puree it, measure and put into ziplock bag in 2c  portions, then freeze and use for pie or pumpkin bars.    Now, with the wonderful pressure canner....I shall can it!  

With canning, its preferred to cut into chunks, raw, add water and a tad but of salt, top off with water, then pressure can.  I am giddy about trying this!!! 

 

We also grew these small pie pumpkins in VT along with the larger watery jackolantern ones. The small ones are okay for pies. Ours always came out really dense, so they were never a favorite of mine, although I can eat them.

 

When I was working my first real job in the Maybelline cosmetics cost accounting division of Plough, Inc. in Memphis, TN, I ate some pie I thought was pumpkin on a regular basis in their absolutely stellar employee's cafeteria. I mentioned to the lunch lady that this was the best pumpkin pie I had ever eaten one day. She told me, "Honey, that's because it's sweet potato pie!" xD

 

I have a good recipe for sweet potato pie with a little bourbon in it, which is optional, if any one is interested. It's not real sweet at all and quite fluffy without having to beat the egg whites separately.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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6 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Oh, my...I just googled "Rachel Ray garbage bowl" and it is actually a thing!  How do you use yours, Kerry?

 

Don't actually have one - but have seen them at the store. A simple stainless bowl works fine for me!

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The only reason I would ever participate in this thread is this: to thank you all for keeping everything pumpkin in one place and giving the thread a clear and simple title so I know to avoid it. The only good pumpkin is a jack-o-lantern with a candle inside. And the only edible part of a pumpkin are the seeds, buttered, salted and roasted. The rest of that glop goes right in the garbage. And as you would imagine, I don't have any positive thoughts about that stuff that comes in a can.

 

The invention of pumpkin spice is a crime. The concept of a pumpkin spice latte is an insult to coffee. And just for the record, while I can't abide pumpkin pie or pumpkin bread, I adore sweet potato pie made from real yams or even sweet potatoes (or a mix!), but it must be totally without the spices that make it try to taste like pumpkin pie. Okay, done.

 

My vote for best breakfast the day after Thanksgiving: leftover sweet potato pie and coffee with chicory. 

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