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Recipe Bloopers


heidih

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17 minutes ago, chromedome said:

For me it wasn't the over-the-phone part, but the hastily-scrawled part. A partial O is automatically a C.

 

I've done this more than once to myself, and my printed lower-case Rs, Ns, Us and Vs all look pretty much alike.

Good point!

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  • 5 months later...
33 minutes ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

"Clavo" is also the word for nail, so clarifying that you want the spice rather than a nail makes sense (though who would think that a nail was part of a recipe?). When you think about it, though, it makes sense--cloves look like tiny nails.

 

I thought whole cloves were known as "nails".  Was this only me?

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

Whatever you crave, there's a dumpling for you. -- Hsiao-Ching Chou

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18 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I thought whole cloves were known as "nails".  Was this only me?

 

Well we used to poke/nail them into whole onions for stock. There are folks here who post beautiful food with different than maybe english.US wording - we get it.

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12 minutes ago, heidih said:

Well we used to poke/nail them into whole onions for stock. There are folks here who post beautiful food with different than maybe english.US wording - we get it.

 

I sincerely doubt "nail" meaning "clove" is limited to U.S. English usage.  I can't easily dig out my O.E.D (or, for that matter read the tiny print).  However according to the L.A. Times our word clove comes 'from the French “clou de girofle,” which literally means clove nail.'

 

"The similarity of cloves to this sort of nail has been noticed in many languages, in the Middle East as well as in Europe, from Spain (clavo) to Russia (gvozdika)."

 

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1998-dec-30-fo-58720-story.html

 

 

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

Whatever you crave, there's a dumpling for you. -- Hsiao-Ching Chou

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6 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I sincerely doubt "nail" meaning "clove" is limited to U.S. English usage.  I can't easily dig out my O.E.D (or, for that matter read the tiny print).  However according to the L.A. Times our word clove comes 'from the French “clou de girofle,” which literally means clove nail.'

 

"The similarity of cloves to this sort of nail has been noticed in many languages, in the Middle East as well as in Europe, from Spain (clavo) to Russia (gvozdika)."

 

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1998-dec-30-fo-58720-story.html

 

 

 

 

I was not going full liuzhou linguistic - just my "everyman" reaction. I should shut the f up

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2 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

I was not going fuk liuzhou linguistic - just mt "everyman" reaction. I soud shit the fn up

 

Unlike @liuzhou I cannot speak for Asian cuisine, however as an everywoman American I knew the whole version of the spice in question as "nails" long before eGullet and the internet.  Apparently much of the culinary world agrees.  Your mileage may vary.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

Whatever you crave, there's a dumpling for you. -- Hsiao-Ching Chou

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25 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I can't easily dig out my O.E.D (or, for that matter read the tiny print).

 

The OED's only reference under 'nail' related to clove is this unrelated meaning

 

Quote

A measure of weight for wool, beef, etc., usually equal to eight pounds = clove n.3


The only reference under 'clove; related to  nail is in the etymology

 

Quote


[ME. clow(e, a. F. clou, in full clou de girofle, ‘girofle nail’ (see clove-gillyflower), clou being a popular addition to the original name girofle, from the resemblance of a single bud of the girofle, with its stalk, to a nail, clou, L. clāvus. In Sp. it is clavo, Pg. cravo.

 

In Mandarin Chinese, the words for nail and clove are homophones, but otherwise unrelated.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

A terrible thing is ignorance, the source of endless human woes, spreading a mist over facts, obscuring truth, and casting a gloom upon the individual life. - Lucian of Samosata (born 120, died after 180 CE)

 

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The NYTimes has a recipe that has a very big fail in the ingredient list. A few years now. In the comment section so many have said, "please fix this recipe". Must be something I make and refer to often but can't remember now what it is. 

 

This one bugs me from Food52, finger limes

Where are the 20 pics most put in these post from every angle. One pic and the most important characteristic is out of focus. Yes it is described in the copy but pretty stupid to not show the beads of lime in the cut fruit. 

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8 minutes ago, Annie_H said:

The NYTimes has a recipe that has a very big fail in the ingredient list. A few years now. In the comment section so many have said, "please fix this recipe". Must be something I make and refer to often but can't remember now what it is. 

 

This one bugs me from Food52, finger limes

Where are the 20 pics most put in these post from every angle. One pic and the most important characteristic is out of focus. Yes it is described in the copy but pretty stupid to not show the beads of lime in the cut fruit. 

 

I've often wondered if some bloggers are wanna-be professional photographers.  Pictures go on and on and on........  as for the NYT, I came across a recipe a while back that had a glaring error in it.  Many complained in the comments section.  Some of these comments were 2 years old.  I wrote to them to ask them why, in light of all the comments, they had not fixed it.  They neither replied nor fixed the error.  According to their newsletter, they read every single letter.  Sure they do.

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54 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Pictures go on and on and on.......

And they detail every minut step in the recipe! From chopping onions to heating the frying oil, they don't give you credit for knowing anything. More and more, if they don't have a jump to the recipe button, I jump to another site.

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  • 1 year later...

I just saw a recipe which started 'rub your thighs with the spice mixture'. Now I have to wash my pants!

 

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

A terrible thing is ignorance, the source of endless human woes, spreading a mist over facts, obscuring truth, and casting a gloom upon the individual life. - Lucian of Samosata (born 120, died after 180 CE)

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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3 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I just saw a recipe which started 'rub your thighs with the spice mixture'. Now I have to wash my pants!

 

 

 

Definitely a blooper; the recipe omitted the step "Remove your pants."

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On 6/4/2022 at 1:59 AM, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

"Clavo" is also the word for nail, so clarifying that you want the spice rather than a nail makes sense (though who would think that a nail was part of a recipe?). When you think about it, though, it makes sense--cloves look like tiny nails.

I had a book with that clarification.

 

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Last night I made a recipe from Food52 for dark chocolate olive oil banana bread -- why not?  

 

Anyway, it calls for half a cup of cocoa powder, and a pile of chipped up dark chocolate.  The batter is deep and dark.

 

And it instructs one to bake the loaf until "golden brown".  ?!

 

 I went with the good ole "pulling away from the sides".  

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6 hours ago, Susanwusan said:

I had a book with that clarification.

 

The word for clove in most languages is derived from the word for "nail," or so I've been told. Oxford agrees insofar as English and its derivation from older French, at any rate, but perhaps Liuzhou will weigh in once his day starts.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I have been scratching my head over a recipe that advises me to

 

"fry until the surface is raw, then pick up to control the oil."

 

OK. If you insist!

 

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

A terrible thing is ignorance, the source of endless human woes, spreading a mist over facts, obscuring truth, and casting a gloom upon the individual life. - Lucian of Samosata (born 120, died after 180 CE)

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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