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Pork Chops


helenas

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Here is what eHow has to say

Loin chops are the ones located nearer to the lower back or loin of the pig and have the most tender varieties. Rib chops are normally attached to one rib of the loin, cut about 1 in. thick and usually weigh between 4 and 5 oz. The center cut chop weighs about an ounce more and has the same thickness. It has a T-bone in it and includes a tenderloin section, which makes it well liked. Top loin boneless chops, also called center cut or America's cut, weigh between 5 and 6 oz. and are about 1 1/2 in. thick, which makes them good for stuffing. The boniest loin chop, cut from the shoulder end, is only about 1/2 in. thick and weighs around 4 to 5 oz.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/info_8256783_types-pork-chops.html

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Here is what eHow has to say

The center cut chop weighs about an ounce more and has the same thickness. It has a T-bone in it and includes a tenderloin section, which makes it well liked. Top loin boneless chops, also called center cut or America's cut, weigh between 5 and 6 oz. and are about 1 1/2 in. thick, which makes them good for stuffing.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/info_8256783_types-pork-chops.html

 ... Shel


 

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I just want to clarify the statement about "pink is your friend"--I'd rather say that an instant-read thermometer is your friend. The "recommended" temperature for pork is usually 160, but today's leaner pork can be cooked to lower temperatures because of better farming practices. If there were any trichinosis present, and there is virtually no chance of that anymore, it would be killed when the pork reached 137 degrees. I've seen recommendations for cooking pork to 140, which just passes this 137 threshold. That would give you something a little on the rare side, which is unappetizing to some. Just remember that the meat will continue cooking for a few minutes after it is removed from the heat and the temperature will rise about 5 more degrees.

 

 

Assuming a fattier chop, as from some heritage pork, what temp might be recommended?

 ... Shel


 

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Serve with mashed potatoes.

 

For some reason, I really love pierogies with pork chops.  With the butter and sautéed onions.

 

One of the best chops I've had was lightly breaded and deep fried (still mostly pink in the middle).  I suspect it was brined.

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Thick pork chops will be seared in a hot skillet, turned, and finished in 300-deg oven.  I'm just curious if you'd use a stainless steel pan (in this case either an All-Clad skillet or sauté pan) or cast iron skillet for this, and why you would use your preference over the other?

 ... Shel


 

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Cast iron here too,  much  higher  emissivity than stainless. 

Take the time to preheat properly . easiest way to  preheat evenly is  in a 350 oven for about 20 mins .   You are preheating the oven anyway to finish the chops. 

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I only have cast-iron, so...

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

A terrible thing is ignorance, the source of endless human woes, spreading a mist over facts, obscuring truth, and casting a gloom upon the individual life. - Lucian of Samosata (born 120, died after 180 CE)

 

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My stainless steel skillet gets blazing hot.. too hot if I am not careful.  I get good, quick browning with it and a little oil.  I have cast iron but I use it more for retaining heat over a longer period of time than for getting hot enough for a quick sear.  

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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There is no single answer. It depends on lots of factors.

 

1. What is the recipe?

 

2. How thick are the chops?

 

3. What kind of heat source, induction? gas? electric?

 

4. construction of the stainless pan?

 

5. Do you want grill marks?

 

6. Does your cast iron pan have a cover?

 

 

I use both stainless and cast iron.

 

dcarch

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Hardly any stainless steel pans use stainless for more than the cooking surface, so there's no way to generalize. A thin aluminum pan with stainless cladding won't sear as well as most cast iron pans. A heavy copper pan with stainless cladding will sear better than most.

 

Searing ability comes down to two factors: heat capacity (which is the specific heat of the material multiplied by its mass), and conduction. High heat capacity means the pan can store a lot of energy, and high conduction means it can deliver it quickly to the food.

 

Cast iron has fairly low specific heat, but since cast iron pans are usually massive, they have very high heat capacity. Iron is a moderately good conductor of heat. Cast iron pans sear better than most others, although heavy copper or very heavy aluminum can be even better. 

 

I like stainless steel better than other surfaces, partly because the bright color makes it easy to see how browned  the pan drippings are. As much as I like my cast iron pans, they're my least favorite for searing when I want to make a pan sauce.

Notes from the underbelly

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Any difference would be negligible, since both pans sear well and it's the oven that does the final cooking. I might have a slight preference for the All-Clad or similar stainless/aluminum core pan simply because it is more responsive than cast iron. But it's really a toss-up.

Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

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As much as I like my cast iron pans, they're my least favorite for searing when I want to make a pan sauce.

 

My favorite pans in the cast iron / carbon steel range are Spring USA Blackline (I've tried many alternatives, vintage to modern cast iron and French carbon steel).

 

My hanging pan rack is very crowded, but I kept a large All-Clad stainless steel skillet for acidic sauce reductions after searing. I don't like the effect of acids on cast iron pan seasoning.

Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"

Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

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Yesterday I did a trial run using some inexpensive, commercial pork chops that I picked up at TJ's.  I chose them because they were thick, like the one's I'll be using for the dinner I'll be making later on.  I used my old All-Clad sauté pan for this trial and, for the most part, was very satisfied with the results.  The chops had a good crust on the bottom, and ended up with a nice, but not so deep, crust when I turned them and put them in the oven.  Next week I'll try the cast iron skillet, but I do like the All-Clad for making the pan sauce.  Plus the pan is much lighter than the cast iron and has a better (for me) handle, therefore making it easier to move the pan around.

 

Thanks for all the input.

 ... Shel


 

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What i would do is use my trusty well seasoned cast iron pan. Preheat your oven to 300 and put the pan in the oven while preheating. After your oven is preheated turn your stovetop to high. Coat your chops with a high smoke point oil like peanut oil and take your cast iron pan out of the oven and onto the hot stovetop. Then quickly sear one side for 30 seconds to 1 minute tops and flip. Right after you flip them put it right back into the oven and cook as per recipe.

Edited by FeChef (log)
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I like stainless steel better than other surfaces, partly because the bright color makes it easy to see how browned  the pan drippings are. As much as I like my cast iron pans, they're my least favorite for searing when I want to make a pan sauce.

Yep.

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I think by discussing all different brands and build of cookware, kinds of heat, etc, people are getting away from the original basic question of what to use for a good browning: Cast Iron or All Clad steel? 

 

If the question is about All Clad, then no question, cast iron will make searing easier. The bigger the piece of meat, and the weaker the burner, the more difference it will make. If you're on a 2200 btu/hr restaurant burner, I doubt the difference would matter.

 

The key is that all clad stainless pans, structurally, are lightweight aluminum. They're very responsive, but don't store a lot of energy.

 

FWIW, I have a 10" AC stainless pan and relatively weak stove, and I use them in concert to sear stuff all the time. But if I'm dealing with a bigger piece of meat, or something I want to sear very quickly without risk of overcooking what's underneath, I turn to other choices. These include cast iron, 2.5mm copper (stainless lined), or stainless with a fat aluminum disk bottom.

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Notes from the underbelly

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  • 8 years later...

Fry post SV?

 

I've never done it,  Seems pretty dicey since a fry that's long enough to darken the crust is usually long enough to cook raw meat. And your pork would be cooked already.

 

An airfryer might be a thought.

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Personally, I don't see all the hype about sous vide for pork. Granted, the pork that we get down here is excellent and is usually pretty tender. But if I have any question at all, I brine it in one cup of water to one tablespoon of salt. Moreover, if I'm paying the price that they are getting for these pork chops, they darn sure better be tender.

My method for breaded pork chops is this. One, brine the pork chops for about 6 hours, rinse, drain, and pat dry.

Two, dredge the pork chops in all purpose flour.

Three, dip the pork chops in a mixture of egg and mayonnaise.

Four, dredge the pork chops in course, dry bread crumbs. Panko is fine but unavailable here. Leave to set in the refrigerator for 1 hour at least.

Five, season and fry quickly in a combination of oil and butter until golden on each side.

Six, finish in a 250° oven for 10 to 15 minutes depending on thickness. This gives me time to make a sauce or a gravy in the skillet that they were cooked in.

This method has never failed me and the chops are always tender and moist.

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@Tropicalsenior 

 

I completely  agree with you.

 

what SV does , is eliminate the '10 to 15 minute ' part of your Rx .

 

a variable.  you brown later.   

 

you get more time to do something else.

 

granted , understanding that variable consistently

 

is what makes great chefs.

 

properly understanding SV' potentioal

 

makes anyone a  a great Sous Chef.

 

Edited by rotuts (log)
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