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Deviled (or Stuffed) Eggs: an appreciation and discussion


Varmint
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I expect my guests any time now but will post these photos before I forget.

Bright yellow yolks:

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Neatly arranged whites - cutting with one of these cheese knives is much easier than a regular knife as the yolk does not stick to the blade.

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Ready to serve:

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 2 months later...

I apologize for post-dredge, but I've had some success adding bacon to deviled eggs. I made nearly thirty of them for a relatively small going-away party, and they were gone before the guests had all arrived. Most things I make don't go over nearly as well.

Instead of coarsely mincing the bacon, I drained it and blended it to a fine paste with mayonnaise, mustard, and loads of freshly roasted garlic before combining with yolks. The use of roasted garlic reduces the required mayonnaise, and prevents the end result from becoming greasy. I seasoned with mustard powder, paprika, and a little cayenne and combined with minced green onion. The additional mustard powder is required to balance the strong flavors of the garlic and bacon.

For those who wish to make the recipe lighter, the roasted garlic provides a soft texture to the yolks without adding fat. The only downside is terrible breath.

Edited by jrshaul (log)
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Can I add my deviled egg two cents? Something I haven't heard mention of in this thread is the food processor. I find that the texture of the egg filling prepared in a FP is quite different from that mashed with a fork, and I prefer it. The food processor makes the filling so very silky and smooth. I use mayo, dijon and maybe a little water with the yolks. Then I add the rest, whatever I am feeling like that day. I cannot replicate the texture of the FPed eggs with a fork, though. It's really nice. I mean eggcellent. Eggceptional. I am eggstatic. Ba dum DUM.

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I apologize for post-dredge, but I've had some success adding bacon to deviled eggs. I made nearly thirty of them for a relatively small going-away party, and they were gone before the guests had all arrived. Most things I make don't go over nearly as well.

Instead of coarsely mincing the bacon, I drained it and blended it to a fine paste with mayonnaise, mustard, and loads of freshly roasted garlic before combining with yolks. The use of roasted garlic reduces the required mayonnaise, and prevents the end result from becoming greasy. I seasoned with mustard powder, paprika, and a little cayenne and combined with minced green onion. The additional mustard powder is required to balance the strong flavors of the garlic and bacon.

For those who wish to make the recipe lighter, the roasted garlic provides a soft texture to the yolks without adding fat. The only downside is terrible breath.

That is possibly the most stunning deviled egg idea I have ever heard in my life. I'm making them this weekend. Terrible breath be damned.

As an aside, does anyone know any tricks for peeling a farm egg? I can't do it; they want to cling to the white and the result looks like a moonscape.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I love onion in my deviled eggs, and with just a knife it becomes a PITA to chop as fine as I like it; there should be almost NO recogonizable bits of onion, no matter how tiny it's cut. Then I remembered the microplane! Eureka, no more minced fingers from a knife or knuckles from the box grater! Now, if the garlic 'reverb' is a bit much for you, dust the tops of the eggs with minced parsley as a garnish. Parsley is known to moderate the scent (dare I say perfume? :laugh: ) of the garlic.

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I've had some success peeling newly-laid eggs.

After hard-boiling them for the sufficient time for their size and then shocking them in cold water, I crack them all over - usually by cracking them a couple of times then rolling between my palms.

I put them into a wire basket, dip them back into boiling water for 1 -2 minutes and then back into cold water.

In most cases this will cause the membrane to separate from the white. It doesn't work on every single egg but 90% of them should peel more easily.

I happened upon this when making "tea eggs" using very fresh eggs. I fully expected them to be "dimpled" but was pleasantly surprised that dipping into the hot tea not only produced the web-like dye pattern but also made them easier to peel.

And I also like chives in my deviled eggs. I always have a good crop of chives and I snip them with very sharp scissors so they don't get crushed. The onion flavor is subtle but there.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Guacamole DE are great. There are recipes online but i just wing it and add avocado to the yolk with finely minced jalapeno, and onion. A little hot sauce or cayenne and some cumin. Garnish with cilantro. Oh i forgot..lime juice. That mixture is even great without the avocado

Capers and anchovies are great

I know i have another recipe that is killer, but cant think of it for the life of me.

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  • 10 years later...

I did a search for a dedicated topic on Deviled Eggs, and couldn't find anything since 2004.  I figured there would have been some innovations and evolution in 18 years.  I doubt anyone back then added sriracha or furikake or everything bagel seasoning to them. 

 

I adore deviled eggs.  Never yet met one I didn't like, from classic to wacky.  When I started looking around for something new to experiment with, I found quite a few but figured eGulleters could provide some worthy variations.

 

Rough definition:  Deviled eggs = yolks made into smooth paste.  Stuffed eggs = some chunky bits allowed, such as bacon, etc.

 

I'm eager to hear how you make them.

 

+++++++++++++++++++

 

Here are two of the wilder ones I came across.  I can't quite imagine peach preserves in deviled eggs, but who knows?

 

Peach Deviled Eggs
Boil and peel 12 eggs.  Cut each egg lengthwise, and scoop the yolks into a separate bowl. Add 1-teaspoon spiced mustard, 1 teaspoon grated Vidalia onion, 1-teaspoon apple cider vinegar, 1/3 cup of Greek yogurt, 2 ounces of cream cheese, 3 tablespoons of peach preserves, and 1/4-cup of finely chopped ham to the yolks. Stir the yolk mixture thoroughly, then fill the egg white halves. Top each egg with sliced fresh peaches and chopped pecans. Let the eggs chill for 1 hour before serving.


Bloody Mary Deviled Eggs
Boil and peel 12 eggs, then cut them in half lengthwise. Arrange the egg white halves on a platter, and put the yolks in a large bowl.   Mash the yolks with a fork. Add 1/2 cup siracha mayonnaise, 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, 1 tablespoon of horseradish, 1/4 teaspoon celery seed, and 1/2 teaspoon salt to the yolks. Mix the ingredients together into a smooth consistency.   Use a pastry bag to pipe the yolk mixture into the egg white halves. Make the topping for the eggs by mixing 1/2 cup diced tomatoes, 2 tablespoons minced celery, 1 tablespoon of lemon juice, and 1-teaspoon of vodka together in a small bowl. Place 1 teaspoon of the topping on each of the 24 egg halves.

 

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We seem to have an abundance of topics on eggs but here you go

Fried devilled eggs.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Two of the best I’ve had are from restaurants — smoked salmon deviled eggs from Felecia Suzanne’s in Memphis, and bacon and cheese bediled eggs from the Wilson Cafe.

 

I’ve made the smoked salmon ones — can’t come up to hers. But I’m pretty good at the cheese and bacon ones. Crisp fried bacon, chopped fine; mayo, a tsp or so of Dijon mustard, and grated sharp cheddar. They’re good topped with a little more cheese and run under the broiler.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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RE deviled egg construction:

 

I've found that the tongue-coating effects of yolk/mayo emulsion hide the taste of smoked and spicy additions. For example, smoked salmon  or trout disappears into the flavor of eggs and mayo in the assembled egg. Candied bacon seems to survive when a biggish piece.

 

I've sometimes resorted to making a lox filling and sprinkling yolk crumbles on the product.

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38 minutes ago, gfweb said:

I've found that the tongue-coating effects of yolk/mayo emulsion hide the taste of smoked and spicy additions. For example, smoked salmon  or trout disappears into the flavor of eggs and mayo in the assembled egg. Candied bacon seems to survive when a biggish piece.

 

Illuminating.  Would you expect smoked paprika to suffer the same fate?

Edited by CookBot (log)
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48 minutes ago, AlaMoi said:

the variety of stuff that one can put on top of egg yolk+stuff, spooned into a half shell hard boiled egg, is perhaps only exceeded by the stuff one can put on a pizza.

 

wait,,,, no , , ,

Pizza devilled egg?  Devilled egg pizza?

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3 minutes ago, donk79 said:

 

Pizza devilled egg?  Devilled egg pizza?

Ham and pineapple devilled eggs? Once you start down that slippery slope…

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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In seriousness, Vivian Howard changed the way I approach devilled eggs completely.  I grew up with a pretty basic egg+mayo recipe. Then I tried her recipe from "Deep Run Roots". Adding butter to the egg really elevates the flavor, as does that tiny hit of hot sauce.

 

I don't think anyone has ever considered devilled eggs health food, so we will ignore that side of this lilly-guild!

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Devilled eggs do not hold much of a place in my family but I have often been asked to make them for others. I find that very few variations get the thumbs up. The people I know who like devilled eggs are traditionalists. A little mayo, a little mustard, some salt and a sprinkling of tasteless paprika seems to be what they want. Even smoked paprika is scorned. It is comfort food and anything that varies from what Grandma made is unwelcome. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, Norm Matthews said:

I get good comments when I add about a teaspoon of dry powdered Ranch dressing to the egg yolks and skimp a little on the mayo.  Sometimes I also like to add a little sweet pickle relish.

No matter what ideas I try, I always go back to the Old Faithful. Mayonnaise, mustard, pickle relish, salt, and pepper. I do like this idea and I will try it next time. I came across this 'recipe' the other day on the internet and although it probably belongs in the bad ideas topic I thought you might enjoy it.

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24 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

No matter what ideas I try, I always go back to the Old Faithful. Mayonnaise, mustard, pickle relish, salt, and pepper. I do like this idea and I will try it next time. I came across this 'recipe' the other day on the internet and although it probably belongs in the bad ideas topic I thought you might enjoy it.

Bad idea is putting it mildly.

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38 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

No matter what ideas I try, I always go back to the Old Faithful. Mayonnaise, mustard, pickle relish, salt, and pepper. I do like this idea and I will try it next time. I came across this 'recipe' the other day on the internet and although it probably belongs in the bad ideas topic I thought you might enjoy it.

That sounds horrific on so very many levels.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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58 minutes ago, kayb said:

That sounds horrific on so very many levels.

Though we should all "remove the yoke" occasionally. :P

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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1 hour ago, Katie Meadow said:

Bad idea is putting it mildly.

 

58 minutes ago, kayb said:

That sounds horrific on so very many levels.

 

Revolting as it was, at least she recommended saving the reserved "yokes" for another use, "such as a real deviled egg!"

Deviled eggs got a shout out in today's newsletter from New York Times Cooking, specifically the cracklin'-topped version served at Turkey and the Wolf in New Orleans, a joint that is already at the top of my list to visit on my next NOLA trip, specifically for their Collard Greens  Melt Sandwich.   Their poster features a nice deviled egg motif, as well as clear indications of the audience they aim to attract.  Although I'm not part of that cohort, I do think their food looks fun and imaginative.

 

Screen+Shot+2020-05-01+at+2.42.15+PM.jpg

 

 

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