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Deviled (or Stuffed) Eggs: an appreciation and discussion


Varmint
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Yes, I own Debbie Moose's book, but the idea of using a recipe for such a basic food goes against every grain of my body.  A bit of this and that, and a good fork and spoon (washing out a sieve after mashing the yolks is such a pain, some mayo, mustard; perhaps some chives or shallots and vinegar is such a good combo...

I have that book as well. Find that the book and a deviled egg platter is a great idea for a hostess gift or kitchen shower. And it's not so much the exact "recipes" that I value. It's more for suggestions as to interesting additions to my basic method.

And my favorite thing to add is a small mound of caviar on top. Sublime.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I am off to the kitchen to boil up some eggs.

And, just how do you mash up the yolks? Do you want them silky smooth, or are you willing to accept some lumps?

Further, if you add stuff, how to account for the extra stuffing in terms of the numbers of white halves?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I am off to the kitchen to boil up some eggs.

And, just how do you mash up the yolks? Do you want them silky smooth, or are you willing to accept some lumps?

Further, if you add stuff, how to account for the extra stuffing in terms of the numbers of white halves?

I mash with a fork for just a few and with the potato masher for larger quantities. If I mash enough there really are no lumps that cry "plain egg yolk" in the finished product.

The extra stuffing with the additions, depending on the amount, is either the cook and her test-taster's treat, or is put in a small bowl and served with toast points, melba toast, or some very plain cracker so as not to overwhelm the egg. Makes a great sandwich with the addition of some chopped green onion or chives, either one-sided on toasted sourdough or sandwiched with an eggy brioche style bread (exponential egg).

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When I contribute deviled eggs to a potluck (happens frequently--I have a couple dozen chickens) I split the boiled eggs, put the whites into a container, make the filling the food processor and carry it to the party in a ziplock. At the party, I clip a corner off the bag and pipe the filling into the halves. Much tidier looking than when I try to carry them already filled.

I have even, in pinch on a camping trip, mixed up the filling IN the ziplock, mashing and kneading the bag until the consistency was right.

sparrowgrass
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When I contribute deviled eggs to a potluck (happens frequently--I have a couple dozen chickens) I split the boiled eggs, put the whites into a container, make the filling the food processor and carry it to the party in a ziplock.  At the party, I clip a corner off the bag and pipe the filling into the halves.  Much tidier looking than when I try to carry them already filled.

I have even, in pinch on a camping trip, mixed up the filling IN the ziplock, mashing and kneading the bag until the consistency was right.

So what's your favorite and most successful list of ingredients?

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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My best friend wanted some DEs for her graduation party a couple of years ago, and the keg of beer she got had a list of foods that were good with it. One was curry, and since we were bbq'ing, I made curried deviled eggs. I mixed the yolks with a little mayo and curry powder plus a bit of cayenne (just a little, enough for a kick). I put a little mango chutney in each white half and then topped off with the yolks. Sprinkled a bit of coconut and chopped peanuts on top to serve. They were just the right blend of sweet and spicy and went great with the beer.

"Life is a combination of magic and pasta." - Frederico Fellini

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My best friend wanted some DEs for her graduation party a couple of years ago, and the keg of beer she got had a list of foods that were good with it. One was curry, and since we were bbq'ing, I made curried deviled eggs. I mixed the yolks with a little mayo and curry powder plus a bit of cayenne (just a little, enough for a kick). I put a little mango chutney in each white half and then topped off with the yolks. Sprinkled a bit of coconut and chopped peanuts on top to serve. They were just the right blend of sweet and spicy and went great with the beer.

I have to say that sounds utterly delicious.

I've got to remember it.

Remind me, will you?

:cool:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I was at a S. MN family reunion this past weekend, and the ladies and I gathered to talk about deviled eggs (of which here were several platters, first of the potluck food to be eaten :biggrin: ).

It appears that there are folks who want a smooth and creamy and dreamy filling for the white halves.

Then, there is the camp of us (primarily me, given that this was a group of elderly S. MN women) who will accept chunks, and something other than may (or Miracle Whip), a tidge (the word of the day), and another tidge of mustard.

My go to non-preferred chunky ingredients include capers, shallots and scallions.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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A couple of summers ago my family all got together on the Oregon Coast. We had a ton of Dungeness crab, so we made deviled eggs using the crab and remoulade -- similar to this recipe by John Folse. They went over pretty well.

I also used to make curried deviled eggs a lot. The mango chutney sounds like a great addition. I have a jar of mango-curry mustard somewhere; maybe I'll try that.

(edited to actually add the link.)

Edited by JAZ (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Everybody-

I am making some deviled eggs and want them to be as pretty as possilbe. If I cook them until the yolks are just done (with no green) the whites are too fragile and deform when I put them on a plate.

Can anyone pass along some suggestions on how to have firm whites and yolks that arent green? I have the fillings perfected, I just need to make sure that the egg whites do their part.

Thanks!

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My best friend wanted some DEs for her graduation party a couple of years ago, and the keg of beer she got had a list of foods that were good with it. One was curry, and since we were bbq'ing, I made curried deviled eggs. I mixed the yolks with a little mayo and curry powder plus a bit of cayenne (just a little, enough for a kick). I put a little mango chutney in each white half and then topped off with the yolks. Sprinkled a bit of coconut and chopped peanuts on top to serve. They were just the right blend of sweet and spicy and went great with the beer.

I have to say that sounds utterly delicious.

I've got to remember it.

Remind me, will you?

:cool:

See - now I'm going to have to go and buy more free range eggs and start reading this whole thread and then read the Southern Foodways Alliance compendium - Deviled eggs, here I come.

Rover

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Hi Everybody-

I am making some deviled eggs and want them to be as pretty as possilbe.  If I cook them until the yolks are just done (with no green) the whites are too fragile and deform when I put them on a plate.

Can anyone pass along some suggestions on how to have firm whites and yolks that arent green?  I have the fillings perfected, I just need to make sure that the egg whites do their part.

Thanks!

I use this little plastic egg timer gizmo, and my eggs are always done just right with no green on the yolks. You can find it with the name Burton (just saw it at Sur La Table), LUX, and Norpro. I have had mine for years, and love it.

As for filling, I always liked making variations on the Brandied Stuffed Eggs from La Cuisine de France by Mapie, the Countess de Toulouse-Lautrec -page 123. Essentially, she used vinaigrette, brandy and a tiny dab of prepared french mustard to moisten the yolk then added capers, minced olives, tuna (which I omit), and allspice. -And served the eggs on a vinaigrette dressed salad of fresh tomatoes and green beans. It's a fairly unique and fancy appetizer with or without the salad.

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Green yolks are more a matter of not cooling quickly enough than overcooking usually. I usually simmer ten minutes for hard boiled eggs and then plunge them in ice water, changing the water a few times as it warms up, so that the eggs are cooled thoroughly before refrigerating them.

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I had a small party tonight, and included deviled eggs (I always have way more eggs than is necessary), and the discussion centered on whether the filling should have any chunky items. I like crunch, or I can go smooth, but there were several folks of the very traditional smooth version.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I couldn't resist the quail eggs in the Union Square Greenmarket yesterday, so this morning's breakfast, with a little inspiration from Thomas Keller's poached "Bacon and Eggs" (mine are hard boiled), was deviled quail eggs with homemade pancetta--

gallery_64820_6661_133486.jpg

To hard boil quail eggs, put eggs in cold water, bring to a boil, and reduce to a simmer for 3 minutes, then chill in ice water and peel under cold water. The eggs have a surprisingly thick membrane, so the trick to peeling them without breaking is to break the membrane and let a little water in to separate it from the white. It's a little tedious. I'm glad I restrained myself and only bought a dozen quail eggs, even though they were $3 a dozen, $5 for two dozen.

The egg salad is made from the quail egg yolks and whites that broke while peeling, a little mayonnaise, grainy mustard, and a brunoise of chornichons. I put the extra quail egg salad over cucumber slices.

Edited by David A. Goldfarb (log)
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I've been eyeing Anna Sortun's (chef at Oleana, Cambridge MA) recipe for deviled eggs with fresh tuna and black olives. Haven't made them yet but I can taste them....yum.


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I've been eyeing Anna Sortun's (chef at Oleana, Cambridge MA) recipe for deviled eggs with fresh tuna and black olives.  Haven't made them yet but I can taste them....yum.

You say you've been eying the recipe. Where did you find it?

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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To hard boil quail eggs, put eggs in cold water, bring to a boil, and reduce to a simmer for 3 minutes, then chill in ice water and peel under cold water.  The eggs have a surprisingly thick membrane, so the trick to peeling them without breaking is to break the membrane and let a little water in to separate it from the white.  It's a little tedious. 

I've recently tried to devil quail eggs and it was not pretty. I assumed the whites stuck to the shell because they were so fresh, like what you'd expect with really fresh chicken eggs.

Are you suggesting a crack in the cold water will help with the separation? That doesn't sound so bad.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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I've recently tried to devil quail eggs and it was not pretty. I assumed the whites stuck to the shell because they were so fresh, like what you'd expect with really fresh chicken eggs.

Are you suggesting a crack in the cold water will help with the separation? That doesn't sound so bad.

A little more than that even. I bought these from a farmer at the Greenmarket, so I assume they were pretty fresh. What worked for me was to crack them, start peeling, and then you can feel the membrane between the shell and the white. Tear the membrane with your fingers, or I suppose you might use a needle or something, and let some water run between the membrane and the white, and it will slip off with the shell more easily.

I think a certain number of broken eggs is inevitable. I think I got 20 halves from a dozen eggs (you can count the eggs in the picture and check me on that).

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