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Dinner 2022


liuzhou
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13 minutes ago, Honkman said:

What makes it American ?


Gyros in Greece is a spit with marinated slices of pork (typically neck/collar) stacked on top of each other, grilled and sliced off layer by layer from the vertically rotating skewer.

 

American gyros is a kind of seasoned meatloaf, comprised of seasoned minced lamb, beef or a mixture thereof, precooked, sliced and fried (or grilled and sliced).
 

Thus, the choice of meat, the resulting texture and the employed cooking method will render it “American gyro(s)”.

Edited by Duvel (log)
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Agreed with the characteristics of Greece gyros but what you described at American gyros is unfortunately also quite regularly seen in other parts of Europe - I had such “gyros” in Spain, Portugal, italy and even back home in Hamburg perhaps 20-30 years ago some of the gyros was quite questionable.

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Inspired by Le Bernardin tuna and foie gras dish chicken liver pâté on thinly sliced and toasted baguette with tuna and thinly sliced spring onions.  
45A2523E-8D5C-4C9D-9CAB-BF06245BE087.thumb.jpeg.3dd6874f49d51db184a5e3c27acba464.jpeg

14B19154-C3FD-4826-A51A-165AF2E3BBD7.thumb.jpeg.606456b890c66d016e1f14156c9df877.jpeg

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I'm not sure what to call this dish other than pretty darn tasty.  The base is chicken stock and coconut milk with the addition of spring onions, baby bello mushrooms, spinach and leftover Calrose Botan rice.  I finished the  dish with bamboo sprouts in chili sesame oil, chili sa-te paste and a squeeze of key limes.  

 

IMG_20220202_190301858.thumb.jpg.34bcbb85904381fbfb3a2a629c16a4a1.jpg

 

  

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Steamed Lion's Head Meatballs made with 3/4 ground beef, 1/4 pork. Much like the bouncy meatballs served at dim sum restaurants. Wrapped in Napa cabbage, and served with a mixture of soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sesame oil. I had a Chinese sausage in the fridge, so sliced that up and added the slices for extra flavour.

 

                                                                                      1352377551_LionHeadMeatBalls6399.jpg.8f26fd08a8654b94248bf233e15ea0a5.jpg

 

                                                                                    

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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10 hours ago, Honkman said:

Agreed with the characteristics of Greece gyros but what you described at American gyros is unfortunately also quite regularly seen in other parts of Europe - I had such “gyros” in Spain, Portugal, italy and even back home in Hamburg perhaps 20-30 years ago some of the gyros was quite questionable.

 

I was under the impression that when you want to get some gyros in the US, you will get almost exclusively the uniform loaf derived variety, and not the stacked Greek version. That doesn't mean you can't get it anywhere else* on occasion, but certainly not as the standard. However, in Europe most of the gyros joints have been replaced by Döner selling ones. Döner is not made from pork and allowed to have a certain percentage of minced meat in the skewer, so is moves into the "American gyros" direction.

 

Adding on that, I don't see the necessity for the "unfortunately" expression ... I think it is a tasty product that serves its purpose, at least in the version I made. Not an elite gourmet food (neither is the Greek gyros), and sure you can always hide anything in a minced meat product, but that would be the fault of the producer/vendor, not of the product itself. 

 

 

---

* Though not in Germany (anymore), as the term "Gyros" is protected by law. They would need to sell it under a different name.

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2 hours ago, Duvel said:

you will get almost exclusively the uniform loaf derived variety

Some years ago I belonged to a Facebook group and one of the women was from Nova Scotia. She gave me a recipe for their version which is called Donair. I have posted it in recipe gullet.

* don't know what's going wrong but I can't seem to get the link right. It keeps giving me the reply form so you will have to scroll up to get the recipe.

Edited by Tropicalsenior (log)
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3 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

Some years ago I belonged to a Facebook group and one of the women was from Nova Scotia. She gave me a recipe for their version which is called Donair. I have posted it in recipe gullet.

The distinctive trait of our variation is a sweet-ish sauce made with condensed milk, for those who don't know. It's the official food of "well, the pub just closed, what do we do now?"

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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17 hours ago, Duvel said:

American Gyros“, made from minced beef & lamb using my Leberkäse method. Cooked in a loaf tin, cooled and refried in thin slices …

Having made both versions. I can see where your method works perfectly for the Donair. It would make a much finer loaf that would be easier to slice in thin slices. Thank you for the idea.

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青椒肉片 (qīng jiāo ròu piàn) - Green Chilli Pork

 

Except it isn't. I made a traditional dish, but had no pork, so I used beef - 青椒牛肉片 (qīng jiāo niú ròu piān). They'll probably deport me.

 

Served with rice and stir-fried water spinach.

 

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You know how you can buy the same chillies 100 times and get to know their heat level, but 1 in 100 blows your brains and mouth out! That's what happened today! That baby was spicy!

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

That baby was spicy!

Lucky for you that you have a fair supply of beer on hand thanks to your friendly mom-and-pop store.
Edited to add before someone feels obliged to point out to me – – I know  dairy  is supposed to calm the heat. 

Edited by Anna N (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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23 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Lucky for you that you have a fair supply of beer on hand thanks to your friendly mom-and-pop store.
Edited to add before someone feels obliged to point out to me – – I know  dairy  is supposed to calm the heat. 

Yes, but as ivrywun noes China doesn't do dairy, does it?

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/161694-china-food-myths/?do=findComment&comment=2272799

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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29 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Lucky for you that you have a fair supply of beer on hand thanks to your friendly mom-and-pop store.
Edited to add before someone feels obliged to point out to me – – I know  dairy  is supposed to calm the heat. 

Yes I've heard that old saw about dairy calming the heat, but who wants to drink a glass of milk after eating delicious spicy Chinese food?

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17 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

Yes I've heard that old saw about dairy calming the heat, but who wants to drink a glass of milk after eating delicious spicy Chinese food?

 

Dairy does calm the heat but it's not something I regularly have on hand. Fortunately, I'm highly chilli tolerant.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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43 minutes ago, Ann_T said:

Three recent meals.

374033946_GrilledFiletMignonFebruary2nd20223.thumb.jpg.3483267e9669f6d231b246ca7896a242.jpg

Grilled Filet Mignon

638990550_GrilledFiletMignonFebruary2nd20222.thumb.jpg.20b90b4d5c3c71f1486026e5707af834.jpg

 

with mushrooms and garlic butter and oven roasted potato wedges.

This was meant to be dinner, the night before, but ended up as breakfast yesterday. 

154476309_ChickenSouvlakiJanuary30th2022.thumb.jpg.d0527233a81337f9d2897b1f63e0793d.jpg

Chicken Soulvaki

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Cabbage rolls.  

 

 

Gorgeous plates, as usual, @Ann_T.      But please tell us how you are healing.     All good thoughts continuing...

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eGullet member #80.

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11 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Gorgeous plates, as usual, @Ann_T.      But please tell us how you are healing.     All good thoughts continuing...

@Margaret Pilgrim, Thanks for asking.   Hard to believe that it has  been six weeks today since the accident.  Finally well enough to  go out last weekend  with Moe to look for a replacement car.   

Neck is still an issue so still wearing a neck collar.  And I have an appointment scheduled on the 14th for a follow up CT Scan on head and neck.  Hope to be able to get back to work soon. Going into town later this morning for my booster shot.  I had it scheduled around the time of the accident and had to cancel two appointments.   

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Ann_T (log)
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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Yes, but as ivrywun noes China doesn't do dairy, does it?

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/161694-china-food-myths/?do=findComment&comment=2272799

And beer is so much more refreshing. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Yes, but as ivrywun noes China doesn't do dairy, does it?

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/161694-china-food-myths/?do=findComment&comment=2272799


I remember a particular JV negotiation with a large state-owned company near Chongqing. Before the banquet at night our hosts insisted we drink each about 500 mL of room temperature drinking yoghurt „to protect your stomach“. I was impressed, because I was expecting a rather spicy Sichuan dinner* and thought it is very thoughtful. But my translator assured me that this was only to counteract the copious amounts of alcohol that they would „force“ us to drink later. 


Unfortunately for them, after a few obligatory rounds of ice-cold red wine they left the choice of the hard liquor to us. It seems the drinking yoghurt did not protect their stomachs against Chivas Regal …



—- 

* and it was

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I managed a total hack/fail with sushi. It was 'extra credit'. The meal was planned dumplings. A big side salad. 

I was not set up properly for sushi but went for it last minute. It has been a while. I forgot all the tricks. (bowl of warm water for hands, etc) I had more sticky rice on my hands than the rolls. The flavor was there. Good trial run for the next dinner guests whenever that will be. 

(a couple friends have teens---nasty winter colds passing around and we don't need that)

...with SeaBeans...

Screen Shot 2022-02-03 at 9.07.22 AM.png

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22 hours ago, chefmd said:

Inspired by Le Bernardin tuna and foie gras dish chicken liver pâté on thinly sliced and toasted baguette with tuna and thinly sliced spring onions.  
45A2523E-8D5C-4C9D-9CAB-BF06245BE087.thumb.jpeg.3dd6874f49d51db184a5e3c27acba464.jpeg

14B19154-C3FD-4826-A51A-165AF2E3BBD7.thumb.jpeg.606456b890c66d016e1f14156c9df877.jpeg

I hit "like" before I realized that the raw tuna was on top of the lovely foie.  Can you please remove the tuna from a couple of the toasts for me?  😁

 

Last night:

IMG_8144.thumb.jpg.6598dc42dae5de1e4131e8fa222e3027.jpg

Really good Dietz and Watson natural casing dogs with fixed up Bush's beans and tots.  I offered a wide array of "go-withs".  I chose a Carolina dog (mustard, chili, slaw - it usually has raw onions, but I detest them) and had my kraut on the side.  

 

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