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Lox: Is there anything it can't do? Well, yes, at least one thing.


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Here's a fun read for those of us who are interested in both food and etymology.

 

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"One of my favorite words is lox,” says Gregory Guy, a professor of linguistics at New York University. There is hardly a more quintessential New York food than a lox bagel—a century-old popular appetizing store, Russ & Daughters, calls it “The Classic.” But Guy, who has lived in the city for the past 18 years, is passionate about lox for a different reason. “The pronunciation in the Proto-Indo-European was probably ‘lox,’ and that’s exactly how it is pronounced in modern English,” he says. “Then, it meant salmon, and now it specifically means ‘smoked salmon.’ It’s really cool that that word hasn’t changed its pronunciation at all in 8,000 years and still refers to a particular fish.”

 

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Very misleading title. "The English Word That Hasn’t Changed in Sound or Meaning in 8,000 Years". English is only around 2,000 years old. Also, there is no mention of the word 'lox' appearing in print in English unti as recently as 1941!

 

There is also evidence that it was also prononced 'lax' in the past.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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3 hours ago, haresfur said:

I thought lox was cured, not smoked. Or is that too pedantic?

 

Right...in my book, lox (or, more correctly, belly lox, sometimes called salty lox) is cured and not smoked. Like gravalax. Smoked salmon (nova for those who know it by this term) is cold smoked.   And kippered salmon is hot smoked.

 

Too pedantic for eG? NEVER!

 

At Russ, if you ask for "lox," they may even ask you if you know what it is. 

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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6 hours ago, haresfur said:

I thought lox was cured, not smoked. Or is that too pedantic?

 

2 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

Right...in my book, lox (or, more correctly, belly lox, sometimes called salty lox) is cured and not smoked. Like gravalax. Smoked salmon (nova for those who know it by this term) is cold smoked.   And kippered salmon is hot smoked.

 

Too pedantic for eG? NEVER!

 

At Russ, if you ask for "lox," they may even ask you if you know what it is. 

 

Absolutely important to make these distinctions.    I can tolerate and enjoy salmon as ceviche and the loxes but find that any of the smoked versions cause me digestive distress.  

eGullet member #80.

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I thought 'lox' was just a bastardized shortening of 'gravlax', a Scandinavian word w upon googling Germanic before that:

 

"Etymology. The word gravlax comes from the Scandinavian word gräva/grave ("to dig"; modern sense "to cure (fish)") which goes back to the Proto-Germanic *grabą, *grabō ("hole in the ground; ditch, trench; grave") and the Indo-European root *ghrebh- "to dig, to scratch, to scrape", and lax/laks, "salmon".

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That wasn't chicken

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8 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

Right...in my book, lox (or, more correctly, belly lox, sometimes called salty lox) is cured and not smoked. Like gravalax. Smoked salmon (nova for those who know it by this term) is cold smoked.   And kippered salmon is hot smoked.

 

Too pedantic for eG? NEVER!

 

At Russ, if you ask for "lox," they may even ask you if you know what it is. 

 

I had totally forgotten, "nova." Thanks for the reminder. Although we just say, "smoked salmon" in Australia and no one seems to identify cold vs. hot except by looking at it.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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It may be cultural. I prefer Nova, but then I love smoked Sable too

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"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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I have in my freezer three 8-oz packages of hot-smoked salmon, which a local charity smokes and sells every fall. Any thoughts of recipes? I'm familiar with its use with pasta in a cream sauce, and I've used it in salads. Found a recipe for it in a salad with quinoa and brown rice that looked interesting. Obviously in a cheese spread. Other ideas?

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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We like it (hot smoked) served with a Vietnamese style herb/lettuce plate. So rolled up with greenery of choice and a dollop of horseradish mayo or sour cream, Horseradish is essential.  Thin slivers of cucumber (preferably a Persian style) add a nice note. Sit around, munch, listen to music and laugh at our younger selves..

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2 hours ago, kayb said:

I have in my freezer three 8-oz packages of hot-smoked salmon, which a local charity smokes and sells every fall. Any thoughts of recipes? I'm familiar with its use with pasta in a cream sauce, and I've used it in salads. Found a recipe for it in a salad with quinoa and brown rice that looked interesting. Obviously in a cheese spread. Other ideas?

Makes a good dip.

Not that anyone's entertaining much, at the moment...

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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1 hour ago, chromedome said:

Makes a good dip.

Not that anyone's entertaining much, at the moment...

 

Yeah - with frozen/defrosted hot smoked, that's as good as it's going to get. Dip or spread - cream cheese, mayo, sour cream, yogurt, chives, dill, lemon, etc. etc. s

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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5 hours ago, kayb said:

I have in my freezer three 8-oz packages of hot-smoked salmon, which a local charity smokes and sells every fall. Any thoughts of recipes? I'm familiar with its use with pasta in a cream sauce, and I've used it in salads. Found a recipe for it in a salad with quinoa and brown rice that looked interesting. Obviously in a cheese spread. Other ideas?

Hot smoked salmon was something I didn't really get exposed to until I moved to the west coast. The Pacific North West, often small roadside stands, makes hot smoked salmon (and other hot smoked fish like Black Cod) one of the great treats of a road trip along the coast. Often it doesn't last longer than the destination. When it's good it's nice and moist and flakes easily. 

 

But one of my favorite uses of hot smoked fish is in kedgeree, that Indian-colonial cultural mix of rice, fish, and sometimes chopped hard-cooked egg, often lightly curried. Recipes often specify smoked haddock, but we don't get that around here, and salmon is perfect. Very comforting dish!

 

I also like hot smoked salmon in some kind of fried fish cakes, with potatoes and other ingredients. Variations are numerous. Or, if I'm really lazy, I do nothing with it, just pick away at it as an appetizer on dark rye or crackers or all be itself. It could also be good in a breakfast quiche or pie. 

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Thanks, all. I'd bookmarked a kedgeree recipe as a potential. Also some fish cakes that are a combo of poached and smoked salmon. We shall see.

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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1 hour ago, kayb said:

Thanks, all. I'd bookmarked a kedgeree recipe as a potential. Also some fish cakes that are a combo of poached and smoked salmon. We shall see.

That works; I'll even use a can of salmon to make fish cakes.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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