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gfron1

Andrey Dubovic online classes

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I can totally understand people not showing that technique if they learn it, I mean, they *paid* for it.

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4 hours ago, keychris said:

I can totally understand people not showing that technique if they learn it, I mean, they *paid* for it.

 

That's just silly. But some people are. :D 

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4 hours ago, Rajala said:

 

That's just silly. But some people are. :D 



Sometimes it's difficult to get the intent on internet posts, are you saying it would be silly for them to not want to teach us something for free that they paid a lot of money to learn? 

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Posted (edited)

I didn't mean offence to anyone with my post I'm just aware that before anyone started on the course his bon bons were consistently discussed on the 'how did they do that thread ' I wouldn't expect anyone to share as you have pointed out they have paid and i have not. Just thought this is a forum where technique is often shared and discussed and I was merely in awe of the skill being shared 


Edited by Je33 (log)

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Posted (edited)

I remember having a conversation about sharing of info after our first Vegas workshop. Its tough because yes, I've paid a hefty amount of money to learn this material which I don't have that kind of cash laying around, but also, we as a forum community have always prided ourselves on sharing of knowledge. My attitude is that I will happily share anything with folks at the eG workshops because it shows that there's a commitment of resources (time and or money) to value the knowledge. Here in the forum, I'm always happy to share my work for inspiration knowing that many, many of us can dissect a picture and figure it out for ourselves; and share key learnings as we've already done. I mean really, how many times have Kerry, James and I (and countless others) explained the tempering process or how to spray cocoa butter? I doubt anyone who has been on the forum for more than a day would call us stingy with information. 

ETA: I was reminded that Andrey is trying to make a living off of sharing his knowledge through the workshops, so while sharing is always encouraged in the chocolate world, consideration for expertise is necessary.
 

Quote

 


Edited by gfron1 (log)
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1 minute ago, Je33 said:

I didn't mean offence to anyone with my post I'm just aware that before anyone started on the course his bon bons were consistently discussed on the 'how did they do that thread ' I wouldn'

Nothing to take offense at. If you look at the course description you'll see what we are covering. I'm guessing that you are referring to the eyeball technique (not necessarily the black dot in the center but the cool marble-like glossy domes, and yes, those are coming soon for us. Without having watched those videos yet I have no doubt it is air-blasted cocoa butter understanding what we have already covered - translucent colors.

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At some point in the near future, I'd love to do his class. I've been following all the posts, and the ones about straining cocoa butter caught my eye.  @gfron1 and @Jim D.  were discussing the issue of straining the cocoa butter.  I was very dismayed with the amount of cocoa butter that seemed to get caught up in cheesecloth, coffee filters, etc.  So, being the girly-girl I am...my mind traveled in another direction. Pantyhose.  I bought a package of the knee high's, washed and dried them, cut them in sections, and I will just say they are marvelous for straining cocoa butter!  It catches the tiniest bits, and absorbs almost none of the beautiful colored CB. It's a little weird and unorthodox I guess, but it works.   So, I'll just throw that out there if anyone wants to test it out. 

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5 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:



Sometimes it's difficult to get the intent on internet posts, are you saying it would be silly for them to not want to teach us something for free that they paid a lot of money to learn? 

 

Yes. That's exactly what I'm saying. I'm not sure silly is a word that would offend someone, that's not the intent (English is not my native tongue), but in my mind I would _always_ help someone with anything, if I could. But, to each their own. :) 

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58 minutes ago, ChocoMom said:

I bought a package of the knee high's, washed and dried them, cut them in sections, and I will just say they are marvelous for straining cocoa butter!

 I was with @Kerry Beal a day or so ago when she picked up (new) pantyhose in the thrift store for just that purpose.   :)

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@Anna N  I had second thoughts about posting that, worried that you all might think I'm crazy.   I'm so glad to see I am not the only one who uses hosiery like that!!  xD  Thank you!!!! 

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Haha, that's fantastic. :D 

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1 hour ago, ChocoMom said:

@Anna N  I had second thoughts about posting that, worried that you all might think I'm crazy.   I'm so glad to see I am not the only one who uses hosiery like that!!  xD  Thank you!!!! 

Hey!   Whatever works I say.   So long as I never have to wear the damn things again. 

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I'd love to do the course, but I just don't see being able to do it on any kind of a strict time schedule. I hope at some point he does some sort of a class format that would allow more of a "work at your own pace" class. I would expect less feedback with that sort of a class, but as a hobbyist with a more than full time job, it's the only way I can see doing it before I retire... 

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3 hours ago, Rajala said:

 

Yes. That's exactly what I'm saying. I'm not sure silly is a word that would offend someone, that's not the intent (English is not my native tongue), but in my mind I would _always_ help someone with anything, if I could. But, to each their own. :) 


I wasn't thinking the word silly would offend anyone. I wasn't thinking anyone would actually be offended by anything said. I was just thinking the class is available to all who want to take it, not sure it's fair to expect a few to spend the money to take the course and then come here and tell the rest of us how everything's done. Not really fair to the people paying for the course or the person selling the course. No harm in asking, just don't agree that it would be silly of anybody to not want to.

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23 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


I wasn't thinking the word silly would offend anyone. I wasn't thinking anyone would actually be offended by anything said. I was just thinking the class is available to all who want to take it, not sure it's fair to expect a few to spend the money to take the course and then come here and tell the rest of us how everything's done. Not really fair to the people paying for the course or the person selling the course. No harm in asking, just don't agree that it would be silly of anybody to not want to.

 

That's fair! We all have different mindsets.

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On 6/14/2018 at 2:39 PM, tikidoc said:

I'd love to do the course, but I just don't see being able to do it on any kind of a strict time schedule. I hope at some point he does some sort of a class format that would allow more of a "work at your own pace" class. I would expect less feedback with that sort of a class, but as a hobbyist with a more than full time job, it's the only way I can see doing it before I retire... 

 I don't know if this arrangement would suit you, but to the following question:

 

Quote

I’m interested in signing up for this course but I unfortunately don’t have the equipment with me right now. That is to say I will not be able to complete the homework assignments. Would you mind if I just signed up for just the theory and practice later on my own time.

 

Dubovik replied:

 

Quote

...you may skip task submission. In this case you won’t receive a certificate on a course completion but you’ll be able to work with all the materials on your free time.

 

He doesn't say whether a student could submit some of the homework (but not necessarily when scheduled) and get feedback on that, but I would think that would be OK--you just couldn't take longer than 14 weeks. All the course materials are available to students for the 10 weeks of the classes plus one additional month; everything except the videos can be downloaded during that period (and the step-by-step directions include some photos from the videos). The next course begins July 2. 

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I have found that a recalcitrant bonbon may be coaxed into coming out of the mold when placed in the freezer for 3 minutes. Two days, forgotten in the freezer, on the other hand, pretty much guarantees the suckers will drop right out!

 

IMG_0124.jpg.4d8187990ced10d017ef641b86079804.jpg

 

IMG_0125.jpg.968b2b32cfc6950a0f3081188974d7d5.jpg

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Frost is the new shine huh :D

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20 minutes ago, keychris said:

Frost is the new shine huh :D

You would not believe how shiny they were this morning!

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Posted (edited)

A few more photos of what I have produced for the Dubovik course. As is obvious, these classes have been emphasizing gradient techniques, in each case using a cocoa pod mold.

 

Photo #1:  Filling is a Dubovik take on almond gianduja. He calls for roasting almonds with skins on and a cut-up vanilla bean, then pouring a caramel over everything, and grinding it all (including the bean) until it becomes a paste--very aromatic and delicious.

 

dutton-eg-07.jpg.16d0daf7824a818b02d0f222d9474801.jpg

 

#Photo 2:  If you use your imagination a bit, the same mold becomes a strawberry. I filled it with strawberry pâte de fruit (this is not one of Dubovik's fillings).

 

dutton-eg-08.jpg.b35a79f4ae831d65709bd701fb359db6.jpg

 

 

Photo #3:  Again, with the same mold, it's a sort of yellow and green bean. I did not use Dubovik's recommended fillings in every case because he repeats them, and since I am giving my "homework" to friends and customers to evaluate, I didn't want to bore them with repeats (I have labored hard to make the point that fillings are really more important than the appearance of a bonbon--and yes, I do realize that I am enrolled in a course that puts a total emphasis on the latter). The filling in this one is a Wybauw recipe for dark chocolate ganache flavored with orange and spiced honey.

 

dutton-eg-08-2.jpg.6d7a210fc236c17044fbe7bb3d24b755.jpg


Edited by Jim D. Replaced washed-out photo of strawberries (log)
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Love the “strawberries”. 

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 Nice work Jim!   

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I think the filling in my strawberries is strawberry rhubarb. The cocoa pods contain 'I can't remember' filling! I think it might be bergamot and black pepper.

 

I did the strawberries twice - not happy with my first batch (nor my second actually)

 

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Here's my assignments. First is the cacao pod that I filled with a very basic fluid salted caramel.

cacaopodchoco.thumb.jpg.d9c14594db69e16a54665efe7120a751.jpg

And then the strawberry that I filled with a strawberry balsamic caramel.

StrawberryChoco.thumb.jpg.c29810e7e94781fe8ac6cd8ae2b85a36.jpg

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I'm not buying this cacao pod "strawberry"  nonsense!

 

 

 

 

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