Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Cook-Off 76: Consider the Schnitzel


Recommended Posts

The video that @BonVivant posted talks about the restaurant using pork over veal as it stays more juicy, pounding to about 3x original size from the cut shown which butterflied a slice from the loin allowing them to end up with that dinnerplate size. The idea of starting in the hot pan and then going to lower temp pans of course is a restaurant application but might adapt to one pan with heat adjustmet. The end result looks shatteringly crisp and lovely :)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that I have the Paderno pounder I realized I could make my cutlets as thin as I liked.  I had vacuum sealed a couple cutlets from the other day.  These I pounded till they practically filled their bags:

 

Cutlets03152018.png

 

 

Because they were so thin they were harder to work with but not impossible...

 

Dinner03152018.png

 

 

By the way this a serving platter not a normal dinner plate.  I had two cutlets and two fried eggs.

 

 

  • Like 16
Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎2‎/‎27‎/‎2018 at 12:26 AM, Kim Shook said:

I am loving this thread and have a huge urge for Schnitzel now.  I love all the different versions.  For those of you who are making the tonkatsu version I can vouch for @Marlene's 3 sauce versions to go on it:

Tonkatsu Sauce

Easy Tonkatsu Sauce

Quick Tonkatsu Sauce

 

Now, I need a trip back to the Hobo Hut in Batesville IN for a pork tenderloin sandwich - mayo, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles and always bigger than the bun:

DSCN9897.JPG.e58941ac00efc640ef63ce776e891283.JPG

Meet me there @caroled?  And bring your momma!

You think I could keep her away from you? And remember, I didn't go with ya'll, I was here waiting for the tamale delivery that never came! 

 

  • Like 5

And this old porch is like a steaming greasy plate of enchiladas,With lots of cheese and onions and a guacamole salad ...This Old Porch...Lyle Lovett

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dropped into the grocery store before work on Saturday - found some half price veal. 

 

IMG_8705.thumb.JPG.1d60c2d207bed781d8d3235f62641155.JPG

 

IMG_8704.thumb.JPG.1845d26c8b2f37d90a59c7902826dcd5.JPG

 

This evening giving it the treatment. Seasoned flour, eggs whipped with immersion blender and panko.

 

IMG_8706.thumb.JPG.a399648971c38f6892e5a1eb5c26f26f.JPG

 

I have two 3/4 sheet pans with cutlets in the fridge drying now - will transfer to the freezer shortly and vacuum seal once frozen. 

 

I'll stick a few in the fridge for Tuesday's dinner. 

 

Not a bad haul for around $8.

 

  • Like 13
Link to post
Share on other sites

IMG_8718.jpg.307b778de133e8968c2eaf7dcf95914f.jpg

 

Not my best photo - smoke alarm set off by the second two schnitzel cooking - child started to howl - had to abandon picture taking for responsible mothering. And worse - my schnitzel were a bit browner than I like!

  • Like 7
  • Haha 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...

In my country (Croatia) we have a bit of Scnitzel culture- Naturscnitzel (just the meat, no breading or anything else- as the name implies) is best served with glazed baby carrots (not the sort of baby carrots one gets in supermarkets but very young carrots) and breaded sorts like Vienna-style (dredged in flour, beaten eggs and breadcrumbs) and Paris-style (dredged in flour, beaten eggs and then agin in flour).

 

What we sometimes do differently is like in case of Lika Scnitzel (Lika is mountain region of my country), is prepare them in Vienniese style and then stick them in an oven layered in marinara-like sauce (alternating layers of Scnitzels with tomato sauce, wine, garlic and parsley*) at 250°C until done and Schnitzels have absorbed most of the cooking fluids.

 

* of course, one can also add a bit of mushrooms (like button mushrooms) to the tomato sauce to make it even more delicious.

Edited by Wolf
spelling errors (log)
  • Like 10

A cigarette is the perfect type of a perfect pleasure. It is exquisite, and it leaves one unsatisfied. What more can one want?  - Oscar Wilde

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Wolf said:

In my country (Croatia) we have a bit of Scnitzel culture- Naturscnitzel (just the meat, no breading or anything else- as the name implies) is best served with glazed baby carrots (not the sort of baby carrots one gets in supermarkets but very young carrots) and breaded sorts like Vienna-style (dredged in flour, beaten eggs and breadcrumbs) and Paris-style (dredged in flour, beaten eggs and then agin in flour).

 

What we sometimes do differently is like in case of Lika Scnitzel (Lika is mountain region of my country), is prepare them in Vienniese style and then stick them in an oven layered in marinara-like sauce (alternating layers of Scnitzels with tomato sauce, wine, garlic and parsley*) at 250°C until done and Schnitzels have absorbed most of the cooking fluids.

 

* of course, one can also add a bit of mushrooms (like button mushrooms) to the tomato sauce to make it even more delicious.

 

 

Welcome to eGullet, @Wolf, and thank you for that information! The Lika Schnitzel sounds excellent. Is this something you make at home, or is it more a dish to be found at a restaurant?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Welcome to eGullet, @Wolf, and thank you for that information! The Lika Schnitzel sounds excellent. Is this something you make at home, or is it more a dish to be found at a restaurant?

 

Thanks, @Smithy. :) It's made at home (usually with leftover Schnitzel). Just found the alternative version, which also uses Vienna-type Schnitzel where they're simmered in white wine with parsley and garlic.

 

A slightly more sophisticated local dish with Scnitzel are so-callet ptičice (meaning little birds) made with veal Scnitzel beaten and rolled up with a mixture of bacon fried with garlic, thyme and parsley, and diced hardboiled egg is also added to the filling. It's fastened with toothpick and browned. Once browned, they're simmered (with or without added mushrooms) in a red wine and tomato sauce for half an hour.

 

And lest I forget... there is also Dalmatian Schnitzel, which is prepared with non-fried Schnitzel and is cooked similar to brudetto- alternating layers of Schnizzel, sliced tomato, sliced onion, and topped with diced garlic and parsley (repeat untill all the ingredients are used up*). Salt, pepper and olive oil. Cooked on stove-top for an hour or an hour and a half. Just like brudetto- the dish is never stirred while cooking; just grab the pot and shake it (without lifting it off the stove) once in a while.

 

* I think the last layer should be onion or tomato. As an aside to this already lengthy post (I appologize for the lack of brevity)- my so called 'friday special', or properly named false brudetto, is made with sliced potatoes instead of the meat (in that case, layers start and end with potato layers) and one adds a ¾ cup of white wine to the dish.
 

  • Like 5

A cigarette is the perfect type of a perfect pleasure. It is exquisite, and it leaves one unsatisfied. What more can one want?  - Oscar Wilde

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Well, I guess it was only  a matter of time, given it's Fall and Food Network etal., is always looking to take a classic dish and push it into the mass media market.  And I'm sure there will be plenty of people who will take them up on trying this method for combining the 'haselbeck' potato technique with a 'schnitzel.'  I won't be one of them as I prefer the schnitzels we've done here in our Cook-Off.  The photo isn't very appetizing and the coating looks a bit dark, as in overcooked, and it certainly doesn't look light and crisp as I prefer in a schnitzel.....

1522679938615.jpg

 

https://www.foodnetwork.com/holidays-and-parties/packages/fall-entertaining-guide/fall-recipes-for-entertaining-?nl=ROTD_101618_rotdimage&bid=14740509&c32=ccf52de7275ff2ce5a975dca3dc615da5d2f1714&ssid=&sni_by=1957&sni_gn=#item-8

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Well, I guess it was only  a matter of time, given it's Fall and Food Network etal., is always looking to take a classic dish and push it into the mass media market.  And I'm sure there will be plenty of people who will take them up on trying this method for combining the 'haselbeck' potato technique with a 'schnitzel.'  I won't be one of them as I prefer the schnitzels we've done here in our Cook-Off.  The photo isn't very appetizing and the coating looks a bit dark, as in overcooked, and it certainly doesn't look light and crisp as I prefer in a schnitzel.....

1522679938615.jpg

 

https://www.foodnetwork.com/holidays-and-parties/packages/fall-entertaining-guide/fall-recipes-for-entertaining-?nl=ROTD_101618_rotdimage&bid=14740509&c32=ccf52de7275ff2ce5a975dca3dc615da5d2f1714&ssid=&sni_by=1957&sni_gn=#item-8

Sounds like a PITA to make it come out right and I suspect it would be difficult to avoid the panko coating from getting soggy down in the bottom of the slit.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

@David Ross The trick is to cut a flat edge to the waxy potato and then place it between 2 chopsticks to keep the knife from cutting through the spud. But still it isn't worth the effort. Unless I've missed something in the preparation.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Why hadn't I tried this before?

Pounded some chicken breasts thin then a simple coating of herb crusted panko.  About 2  

minutes per side then into a low oven while finishing the others.

Served with some homemade applesauce, potato pancakes and a sauerkraut/red cabbage mixture.

  • Like 4

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here in Australia (with the kangaroos not the alps) "schnitzel" is one of the pretty standard menu items in most hotels (bars). Generally, when referring to a schnitzel, it is chicken. 

Here is a list from a menu of a typical club or hotel. Under the general heading of chicken parmigiana:

CHICKEN PARMIGIANA

(all our parmas are homemade & served with chips)

schnitzel

crumbed chicken breast served with gravy and lemon wedge

traditional

homemade napoli sauce, ham and cheese

pepperoni

salami, roast capsicum, red onion, jalapeños, chilli, tabasco and cheese

nacho

mexican salsa, cheese, corn chips, sour cream and guacamole

aussie

ham, bacon, cheese, fried egg and bbq sauce

 

They cook the parma itself and then add the toppings and place under a grill (broiler?)

The "parma" is huge, taking up half a plate and usually placed on top of the chips (fries) The toppings on each type are about the same volume as the parma. Altogether it makes a fairly substantial meal,but when you add chips & salad its a huge meal.

They are a relatively cheap meal often 1/2 ~3/4 the price of a steak type dish.

 

Most establishments would buy in their parmas (schnitzel) already breaded. I guess the reason to treat chicken this way is that the underlying meat does not have to be perfect, because the appearance is covered by the crumbs. Perhaps its a good use for factory layer hens at the end of their laying career. That may also explain why it is relatively cheap.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

I think it's time to revive this Schnitzel cook-off.  This is a pork schnitzel that I served with a peach mostarda.  I was looking for new ways to use seasonal peaches, and had never made a mostarda.  It turned out to be based on a traditional mostarda, but more the consistency and style of a chutney.  I used a basic Dijon mustard so it wouldn't be too hot.  A local German deli and store sells this really fiery mustard, but I'm not one for that kind of heat and I figured it would probably overpower the flavor of the peaches. I make this style of cucumber relish/salad a lot for barbecue meats, and it was really good with the schnitzel. I prefer the fresh breadcrumbs when I make schnitzel.  They are light and crispy.  This time I used a trick I've seen on Japanese cooking videos when they are preparing cutlets.  Take a wire spider and scoop out the breadcrumbs in the pan and sprinkle those over the schnitzel to give it more texture and crisp.  Same thing that some UK fish and chips shops do.

 

Mustard Schnitzel.JPG

For the Peach Mostarda-makes 1 1/2 cups

2 large fresh peaches, peeled and diced

1/4 cup water

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup raisins

1/4 cup chopped dried apricots

1/2 cup white wine choose a like a riesling

1/2 cup Dijon mustard subsitute spicy brown mustard

1/4 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. nutmeg

dash cayenne pepper

 

For the Cucumber Relish-

1 medium cucumbers seeded and diced

1/4 cup diced red onion

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

1 tbsp. granulated sugar

2 tsp. chopped fresh dill

2 tsp. chopped fresh parsley

1/4 cup olive oil

salt and pepper to taste

fresh dill for garnish

 

For the Pork Schnitzel-

4 6oz. boneless pork loin chops

1 tsp. each salt and pepper for seasoning

1/2 cup Dijon mustard

6 slices white bread, crusts cut off

1/2 cup canola oil for frying

4 fresh lemon quarters

1 tsp. paprika for dusting the lemons

 

 

Make the Peach Mostarda-

Place all the ingredients in a saucepot over medium heat. Bring the mixture to a simmer, then reduce to medium-low and cook the mostarda chutney until it’s thick like a chutney, 35minutes. You can make the mostarda chutney ahead of time, then cover and keep in the fridge. Reheat before serving.

 

Make the Cucumber Relish-

Place all the ingredients in a bowl and toss to combine.  You can make the relish a couple of hours ahead to time and keep it in the fridge until ready to serve.

 

Make the Schnitzel and Serve-

Pour the oil into a large, heavy skillet over medium heat.  Heat the oil to 350.

 

Tear the slices of white bread and pulse in a food processor to make breadcrumbs. Place the bread crumbs in a pie dish. Place some plastic wrap on a counter and put one of the pork chops on the plastic wrap.  Place another sheet of plastic wrap on top, then pound the pork thin, about ¼” thick. Season the pork with salt and pepper.

 

Put the mustard in a pie dish and the breadcrumbs in another pie dish. Brush some of the mustard on both sides of the pork.  Put the pork in the breadcrumbs and press to coat on both sides.

Fry the schnitzel in batches, 2-3at a time allowing space in the skillet. Fry the schnitzel in the hot oil until brown and crispy, 2-3 minutes per side. Drain the schnitzel on a cookie rack. Strain the golden breadcrumbs from the oil and sprinkle on top of the schnitzel.

 

Arrange the schnitzel on a serving platter. Spoon some mostarda on top of the schnitzel and around the plate.  Serve with the cucumber relish and wedges of fresh lemon dusted with paprika. Garnish with the fresh dill sprigs.

  • Like 3
  • Delicious 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On board with the cucumber relish.  I am a mostarda fan in general though I lean hot. Not sure how many you are cooking for. Have you tried preserving it as recipe looks like it makes plenty or does it keep refrigerated well? To me Schnitzel is after church in the community hall or part of weddings in the hall - simple flour/egg wash/bread crumb. Yours looks really good. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, heidih said:

On board with the cucumber relish.  I am a mostarda fan in general though I lean hot. Not sure how many you are cooking for. Have you tried preserving it as recipe looks like it makes plenty or does it keep refrigerated well? To me Schnitzel is after church in the community hall or part of weddings in the hall - simple flour/egg wash/bread crumb. Yours looks really good. 

I cook just for myself, but this stores well in the fridge and even holds up in the freezer.  I have neighbors who do a lot of preserving and canning this time of year, so we do exchanges.  I gave a lady some of this yesterday and in return I got wild huckleberry jam, two types of plum preserves including one with rum.  Good deal I think.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, David Ross said:

I think it's time to revive this Schitzel cook-off. 

 


Meanwhile, back in the "unfortunate typos" department.... :P

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, gfweb said:

We missed doing tonkatsu last time around

 

Hhmm - I love when they lay it on a screen thing so it does not sog out. When I took kids unfamiliar with Japanese cuisine it was always the go to. "This is better than KFC". 

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?
      In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:
      The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.
      A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.
      For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.
      Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!
      I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our thirteenth Cook-Off, we're making fresh and stuffed Italian pastas, including gnocchi. I would take a bit here and try to say some intelligent things about pasta in general, but I'm very happy to defer to my betters in the eGullet Society's Culinary Institute! Check out Adam Balic's Pasta around the Mediterranean course here, and click here for and the associated Q&A thread. In addition, Moby Pomerance has three eGCI courses: the first on stuffed pastas in general (Q&A here), and the other two on Tortelli, Ravioli & Cappelletti and Pansotti, Tortelloni and Raviolo.
      Of course, there are also lots of other related threads, including several on gnocchi like this one, this one, and this one; a few fresh pasta threads here, here and here; and a thread on pasta machines.
      So break out your Atlas hand-cranked machine (or, if you're like me, start to justify buying that KitchenAid mixer pasta attachment!), dice up a few heirloom tomatoes, and start cooking! No machine? Then you're on tap for gnocchi, my friend!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to eGullet Cook-Off XLIV! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      We've just devoted a Cook-Off to braised brisket, and we're turning again to moist, well-cooked proteins for our next adventure: ossobuco. You will see it spelled a number of different ways out there, but Marcella Hazan refers to it as one word in her definitive Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, so I'm going with that spelling. No reason to argue with Marcella, after all.
      Ossobuco is braised veal shank, named after the "bone with a hole" that used to be attached to the hind shank of a calf. (Let's all agree to stick to veal, and not have, say, halibut ossobuco. ) The classic Milanese version includes vegetables, tomatoes, wine, and broth, and is served with risotto alla milanese, perfumed with saffron, and with gremolada.
      Some of the versions out there are a bit wacky. In particular, The Silver Spoon Cookbook simmers the 2" thick shanks for 30 minutes atop the stove. Given that Hazan has 1 1/2" shanks in a 350F oven for two hours, I'm pretty sure the SSC is a waste of good veal. Indeed, I'd think that a much lower oven for longer would work wonders.
      There are more things to talk about here than just braising temps and times! For example, many other versions of ossobuco depart from the Milanese approach. In her out-of-print More Classic Italian Cooking, Hazan provides the recipe for Ossobuchi in Bianco, the white referring to a sauce lacking tomato. In The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, Giuliano Bugialli offers ossobuco Florentine style, with peas and pancetta, and Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Italian Country Table offers a home-style version with mushrooms, favas or snap peas, and more intense flavors such as anchovy, sage, and rosemary.
      We have one short discussion of ossobuco here, and an even shorter one on wine pairings here. Indeed, as is often the case with Italian food, the best discussion is the one shepherded by Kevin72, the Cooking and Cuisine of Lombardia, which muses on on the dish's origins and execution throughout.
      I'm wondering a few things myself. Some folks say that braised veal cannot be reheated, unlike other dishes that benefit from a night in the fridge. I'm also wondering what other sorts of sides -- polenta, say, or the Italian mashed potatoes that Hazan suggests for the ossobuchi in bianco -- would work and/or are traditional.
      So who wants to welcome the new year with some bones with holes?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options.
      So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places.
      A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include:
      -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers!
      -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry.
      -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again).
      Here are a couple of related eGullet threads:
      lamb kangari
      a lamb and goat thread
      If anyone finds more, post 'em!
      So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      This cook-off focuses on felafel. I've enjoyed fine felafel here in the US and overseas, but I have literally no idea how to make this, the national street food of at least a handful of Middle Eastern countries. Several people who have recommended this cook-off did so because, while they felt they had some clues, they didn't really have a consistently successful recipe or method. Sounds like a good cook-off topic, eh?
      There are a few topics on the felafel matter, including this one on tips and tricks, an older topic that finds more woes than techniques, and this preparation topic, How Do You Like Your Falafel? I also found this recipe by Joan Nathan, which seems like it might be useful.
      But what do I know? Not much, I'll tell you. Time to chime in, you!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...