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Okanagancook

Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 5)

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28 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I can't wait to get a copy to play with!

 

It has some interesting recipes  that's for sure.

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Posted (edited)

looking forward to " iPot for Two ' from my library

 

noticed this yesterday :

 

https://www.engadget.com/2019/03/04/instant-pot-owner-merging/

 

iPot and the current maker of pyrex merging

 

it not the original maker of pyrex andcorningware , which were made by Corning in CorningNY

 

I hope this works out wetland the iPot crew get their ' just ' rewards.

 

hope Pyrex does not dumb down the iPot for better margins

 

seems the concept of the iPot has come close to its developmental end.

 

anyway , congratulations to the iPot Crew.

 

P.S.:   there is , of course , a thread on this here:

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/158105-instant-pot-bought-up-by-corelle/?tab=comments#comment-2192349

 

that I had not noticed.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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Lamb shank cooked using sous vide function of instant pot max.  167 degrees for 24 hous.  Fall off the bone tender.  Small volume can be a problem for large meals but I usually cook for two people.  Since IP is permanently living on my counter, it is nice to have SV option.  It will not replace my Joule or Anova ;) for when I do batch cooking.

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@Shelby how many ‘righties’ and how many ‘lefties’?  Or does it matter?🤪

 

Seriously, I need to find a bag of feet to enhance my stocks...not easy to find in little old Penticton.

On the subject of gelatinous additions to stock, does anyone use packaged powdered gelatine ?

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although I missed out on the iPot 8 qt  v2 for  89 USD

 

 Ive recovered from that

 

Id like to hear for those who use the iPot

 

for pressure steaming eggs 

 

right out of the refrigerator 

 

at low pressure steaming

 

i.e. above the 1 cup of water 

 

Im looking for personal experience 

 

where the egg , chilled in cold water or ice water for a minute ore so

 

makes a Perfect Poached Egg  , coddled if  you like ?

 

based on this ATK episode :

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/158144-americas-test-kitchen-new-book/?tab=comments#comment-2194309

 

 

thank you.

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@rotuts  

 

I use Costco standard large eggs right out of fridge.  Somewhere between .5 to 1 cup water in IP with 6-9 eggs in silicone net bag. 3 minutes manual.  I really haven't noticed if high or low pressure.  QR and into an ice bath.  I get an egg with soft pliable white with custardy, slightly liquid yolk.  I'd call that solidly a soft boiled egg.  I don't think I'd equivocate it to a poached egg.

 

I just this morning did 9 eggs (cold and in the silicone bag)  in SV (Joule) 167F for 13 minutes, and THAT is what I would call a poached egg.  I cracked the egg over hot rice and it delivered an ovally, very soft set white exterior and a oozy custardy yolk  interior.  It jiggled.  It looked like a traditional poached egg to me.  I'd might back off a minute for a more oozy yolk in the future to see what happens.  I don't know how I would do that in the IP.  

 

I think in my opinion the biggest difference between boiled and poached eggs in the texture of the whites (?), maybe (?).

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Posted (edited)

I do Costco eggs right out of the fridge with 1 cup of water, eggs on a trivet, for 4 minutes at high pressure, 4 minutes release then 4 (or more) minutes in an ice bath. (The 4-4-4 method.)  They come out perfect.  I have done this in both 8 and 3 qt models.  

 

ETA:  Oops, I thought you meant hard-boiled, not poached.


Edited by mgaretz (log)

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18 hours ago, rotuts said:

although I missed out on the iPot 8 qt  v2 for  89 USD

 

 Ive recovered from that

 

Id like to hear for those who use the iPot

 

for pressure steaming eggs 

 

right out of the refrigerator 

 

at low pressure steaming

 

i.e. above the 1 cup of water 

 

Im looking for personal experience 

 

where the egg , chilled in cold water or ice water for a minute ore so

 

makes a Perfect Poached Egg  , coddled if  you like ?

 

based on this ATK episode :

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/158144-americas-test-kitchen-new-book/?tab=comments#comment-2194309

 

 

thank you.

 

I’m assuming that one day America’s Test Kitchen will get something right ... but I’m still waiting. 

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Posted (edited)

Instant Pot cottage cheese:

 

I had a half gallon of whole milk hanging out in the fridge...and, after reading that cottage cheese is the new greek yogurt , I decided to give this a shot and see if homemade is better than store bought.

 

I poured the half gallon of whole milk into the IP, pressed the Yogurt button, and then the Adjust button until the display read Boil.  I then covered the pot with my glass lid (the regular lid works fine too).  I used a whisk several times to stir and make sure that the milk wasn't sticking to the bottom during this process.  After about 30 mins or so the Beep sounded and I took the temperature--it should read between 170-180F. Turn off the IP.   Next I poured in 1/3 of a cup of white distilled vinegar.  Do this part slowly.  Then very gently stir to move the milk around.  It should look curdled:

 

thumbnail_IMG_6064.jpg.bdcb6eff45c05bd100528ad669f74447.jpg

Let this sit for a while.  Mine probably sat for at least an hour.

 

In a separate bowl, mix 4 TB of cream with a half a teaspoon of salt.

 

Place a strainer over a bowl (to catch the whey if you want to use it) 

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Here is where the recipe said to run a slow stream of cool water over the cottage cheese to remove excess vinegar.  I didn't do that because I thought it tasted great.

 

Place the cottage cheese into a bowl and gently stir in the cream/salt mixture.  Be very gentle or else it will break up the curds.

 

And, then you've got a bowl of wonderful  cottage cheese!

 

thumbnail_IMG_6067.jpg.cbb0e76cb40925bee49e012b1223901d.jpg


Edited by Shelby (log)
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As you saw above, I had a lot of whey left over from making cottage cheese.  I'd say about 4 cups or so.  Anyway, I decided to use this recipe  and make no-knead bread.  I've made two loaves now.  Very easy and tastes good--I did add a bit more salt to the second loaf because the first one didn't have enough IMO, but we are salt people.

 

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thumbnail_IMG_6092.jpg.a90d433e2cbc77d7b61c644cd1b9bcaf.jpg

 

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I'm doing some research for a client, who wants to know what people cook most in multicookers, specifically the top 10 foods. For me personally, (in no particular order) it would be pork shoulder, chuck roast, short ribs, chicken thighs, beans, and cheesecake -- after that, it drops off quite a bit, but probably pasta and sauce combinations, bread puddings and custards, beets and sweet potatoes. What else? What do you cook most often?

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1 minute ago, JAZ said:

I'm doing some research for a client, who wants to know what people cook most in multicookers, specifically the top 10 foods. For me personally, (in no particular order) it would be pork shoulder, chuck roast, short ribs, chicken thighs, beans, and cheesecake -- after that, it drops off quite a bit, but probably pasta and sauce combinations, bread puddings and custards, beets and sweet potatoes. What else? What do you cook most often?

Hmmmmm.....my most often would be:

 

Hard boiled eggs, beans, green beans and potatoes, ribs, chicken gizzards, broth, cottage cheese (a new most often), cheesecake and pork belly.

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31 minutes ago, JAZ said:

I'm doing some research for a client, who wants to know what people cook most in multicookers, specifically the top 10 foods. For me personally, (in no particular order) it would be pork shoulder, chuck roast, short ribs, chicken thighs, beans, and cheesecake -- after that, it drops off quite a bit, but probably pasta and sauce combinations, bread puddings and custards, beets and sweet potatoes. What else? What do you cook most often?

 

 

Rice

Stock

Hard Boiled Eggs

Pasta

Sweet Potatoes

White Potatoes

Assorted Vegetables (cauliflower, broccoli, squash etc....)

Chicken thighs

Meatballs

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

for me :

 

pressure steamed eggs , of various yolk consistencies

 

Pressure steamed potatoes  , either for mashed  ( i feel pressure steaming , w skins always on , gives more flavorful mash  ) or potato salad when cooled.

 

I do these potatoes in bulk and keep refrigerated for P.S.  all sorts of root veg pressure steamed Beets , carrots etc

 

Meat Ragu :  ground turkey / tomato sauce / etc      cooled and molded into ' brinks ' ,  frozen and chamber-vac'd , kept Fz for future use

 

and of course , all sorts of sorts of stock ,  mostly turkey and chicken.   similar ' bricks ' are vac's and frozen

 

and used up to 4 times, i.e. thawed up to 4 times for the liquid in the next version.   ( a 4 x concentrated brick-stock , saving evaporation to concentrate )   Im might do more times, but they get used up

 

for gravy , and soups. and then I start again.  I do use 1 x if that's all I have , they they seem to last for 4 sessions in the iPot.

 

soups.

 

I feel meat in the iP is not as nice as SV meat :  the temps in the iP extrude to much Jus.

 

but I a big fan of Sous Vide that takes up the slack for meat.  I do SV in bulk thus have various meats Vac'd and frozen.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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Posted (edited)

@JAZ

 

Chicken stock

Pork ribs

pork shoulder

beef short ribs

beef stewing beef

rice

dried beans

various soups

 

it's a great way to make cheesecake, I just don't make cheesecake all that often!

 

 


Edited by FauxPas (log)
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51 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Hmmmmm.....my most often would be:

 

Hard boiled eggs, beans, green beans and potatoes, ribs, chicken gizzards, broth, cottage cheese (a new most often), cheesecake and pork belly.

 

How do you usually do the pork belly, @Shelby

 

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1 hour ago, FauxPas said:

 

How do you usually do the pork belly, @Shelby

 

I usually use canned pho broth that I get at the Asian market--dump one of those in the IP, place the belly, fat side up and do it on high for 45 mins.  Easy peasy :)

 

 

Also, I forgot to add rice to my list.  Which would make it a list of 11.   

 

I'm a rule-breaker.

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12 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I usually use canned pho broth that I get at the Asian market--dump one of those in the IP, place the belly, fat side up and do it on high for 45 mins.  Easy peasy :)

 

Thanks! Do you crisp the belly in the oven afterward or anything? 

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Kheer (Indian rice pudding)

chicken stock

short ribs

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Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Stock

eggs

potatoes

dried beans

Pork ribs

stews or curries

 

 

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