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Okanagancook

Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 5)

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On 9/4/2017 at 5:15 AM, Tropicalsenior said:

I don't pretend to understand this disease but you certainly have my sympathy. It must be terrible to live with, especially if you love food.

I don't see why this recipe couldn't be modified. Just use any gluten free cookie for the crust and the flour can be left out of the filling or substituted with any gluten free flour. The cake will just be a little more creamy. I have made this cake four times and it has been perfect each time.

 

Instant Pot New York Cheesecake


Crust
3/4 cup any type of shortbread cookie (crushed)
2 teaspoons sugar
1/4 cup butter melted
Filling
16 oz cream cheese room temperature
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 tablespoon lemon peel grated
2 eggs room temperature
1/4 cup sour cream
1 pinch salt
Sour Cream Layer
1/2 cup sour cream
2 teaspoons sugar

Crust
Add cookies and sugar to the bowl of food processor and pulse a couple of times, until small crumbs form. Melt butter in microwave and add to cookie mixture. Pulse until just combined.
Pour cookie mixture into bottom of greased 8-inch cheesecake pan and press the mixture firmly into the bottom of the pan and no more than one inch up along the sides.
Place pan with crust into freezer for 20 minutes while you mix up the filling.
Filling
Blend together cream cheese, sugar, heavy cream, flour, grated peels, salt and vanilla extract until smooth.
Add eggs, one at a time, lightly mixing until just combined. Do not over mix the eggs.
Pour filling into the pan, on top of the crust.
Add 1 1/2 cups of water to the bottom of your pressur cooker and place a trivet inside the pot.
Cover the cheesecake first with a paper towel and then with a piece of aluminum foil and loosely secure the foil.
Place cheesecake into pressure cooker.
Lock on lid and close Pressure Valve.  Cook at High Pressure for 35 minutes. Allow a 20 minute natural release.
After all pressure has been released, open pressure cooker and leave the cake the cooker. Remove the foil and paper towel. Tilt the cheesecake pan and dab off any liquid that may have accumulated.
Sour Cream Layer
Whisk together the sour cream and sugar and then spread on the hot cheesecake.  Let cool inside the pressure cooker for at least one hour.
Tightly cover and place in refrigerator overnight.  Cheesecake can be removed from pan after an hour in the refrigerator.

Note: the gentler that you treat the ingredients, the denser the cake will be. If you want a creamier cheesecake whip the cream cheese sugar and sour cream together, but never whip in the eggs. This will cause air bubbles in the cake that you do not want!

As I said, I took the procedure and most of the recipe from this website: https://thisoldgal.com/pressure-cooker-new-york-cheesecake/  and it is well worth reading her instructions and tips at this site: https://thisoldgal.com/perfect-pressure-cooker-cheesecake-tips/

20170903_154321.jpg

 

I'm quoting this in its entirety for 2 reasons: first, to repeat the recipe I used and second, because this picture is better than mine.  My dinner guests have gone home and I'm taking a break before cleaning up to thank you (and thisoldgal, before you) for this recipe.  I made it using a graham cracker crust rather than shortbread cookies, and failed to follow the cooling instructions to the letter.  Nonetheless the result was outstanding. 

 

One item gave me heartburn: the ingredient list for the filling lists sour cream, but the instructions for the filling list heavy cream instead: "Blend together cream cheese, sugar, heavy cream,...."  Which was it supposed to be? I dithered.  Then I found mention of sour cream again in this note at the end: "If you want a creamier cheesecake whip the cream cheese sugar and sour cream together,..." I used sour cream, and judging by the result it was the right choice.

 

I was also pleased at how quickly this came together for me.  As a rule I'm an inefficient cook, and new recipes take a long time.  This was no more than 1/2 hour's worth of preparation before I could leave it on its own.   This recipe is a keeper!

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

heavy cream,...

I am so sorry. The original recipe of mine that I adapted this from called for heavy cream and I changed it to sour cream, both for better texture and taste. I missed that when I was editing it to post. Is it too late to go back and edit my original post so that it isn't confusing for others? I'm so glad it worked out for you. This is by far the easiest and the best cheesecake recipe that I have ever made.

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5 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

I am so sorry. The original recipe of mine that I adapted this from called for heavy cream and I changed it to sour cream, both for better texture and taste. I missed that when I was editing it to post. Is it too late to go back and edit my original post so that it isn't confusing for others? I'm so glad it worked out for you. This is by far the easiest and the best cheesecake recipe that I have ever made.

 

It isn't too late, but be sure to note at the end of the post that you edited it to correct an error.

 

I came to enjoy cheesecake later in life, and haven't made it often.  This recipe is wonderful, and something I plan to repeat many times.  It's easy and inexpensive enough that I will probably test small changes like using Neufchatel cheese instead of cream cheese, to see how forgiving it is.  Do you have any comments on the flexibility of the ingredients?

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2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Do you regularly eat a cup at a time?  Really?

I'm usually cooking for two to four people and one thing I really like having on hand is rice in the freezer that I can take out and use for a quick meal. I just freeze it flat in zip-top bags and pop it in the microwave when I need it. Making more rice at one time, for me, is more efficient because I save time and electricity.

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19 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Do you have any comments on the flexibility of the ingredients?

I'm not sure about using the Neufchatel cheese because I haven't used it for years because it isn't available here. I do know that one time I got lite cream cheese by accident and it came out almost watery. It still tasted good and we ate it anyway but I wouldn't make it with that again. I definitely plan to try some different flavor profiles and I think this could be adapted to just about anything. I used Shelby's idea for a savory cheesecake, using these proportions and omitting the sugar and it turned out great. I used some salmon, finely chopped fennel bulb, lemon, dill, and a little bit of smoke flavoring and it was delicious. This week I'm going to see if I can develop one with an Asian twist for a lunch in that I'm going to be giving in two weeks. I'll let you know how that turns out.

As I told weedy in an earlier post, as long as the proportions are right I don't see why this can't be adapted in a lot of ways. I'm already trying to figure out how I can make a pumpkin cheesecake for Thanksgiving.


Edited by Tropicalsenior Self editing (log)
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@Smithy,

 

I can't speak to @Tropicalsenior's recipe for cheesecake which turned out so well for you, but I can say that I always use Neufatchel cheese in place of full fat cream cheese. I was really surprised the first time I looked up true French Neufatchel, because it is nothing like what is sold here under that name as a lower fat, higher protein and calcium version of cream cheese. The American version has no rind, is pastuerized and is not grainy at all, like the description for the French version.

 

I have always has good results with American Neufatchel in cheesecake, but I must add that I have never tried it in a steam bath or even a water bath in a dry oven, because I kind of really like the slight golden browning in a NY style cheesecake. 

 

It could be that in a steamy environment, the Neufatchel will produce a watery result, but it sure doesn't baked in a regular oven.

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The results of my soup last night, after going back and forth from the mini pot to the stock pot turned out really good; in fact, I think the broth came out better because I pressure cooked it.

(I was two hours off in my cooking time because I got lost binge-watching "Alaska: The Last Frontier" on the Discovery Channel.  The series is fascinating!)

 

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14 hours ago, Mmmpomps said:

I"ll be going to Ireland next week so decided to make freezer meals for the Man while I'm gone. I've already done a few curries. Today I made Pasta and meatballs , inside out eggrolls minus the shrimp and next will be beef with veggies in black bean sauce

22046477_10154880136982703_8803657327158161339_n.jpg

22089938_10154880167517703_7031734824112839465_n.jpg

Good Lord, honey, don't spoil him this early in the game. You'll have him absolutely ruined by the wedding.

 

Those meatballs look primo.

 

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Pressure Cooking Today sent me an email saying that Amazon has the Instant Pot Duo 7-in-1 on sale tomorrow: 

 

Instant-Pot-Mini-180

Amazon 1-Day Deal

Monday, October 2, 2017 as of 12:01 PST
Instant Pot Duo 7-in-1 Multi-Use Programmable Pressure Cooker, 6 Quart
$69.99 Save $29.00 or, 30%

Limited to: 5 Per Person or, While Quantities Last

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looks like Amazon is cleaning out the earlier model.

 

excellent deal.

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I caved with that deal.

 

Anyone want or need a Fagor Duo  - 6 qt. model? :D

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"""   Anyone want or need a Fagor Duo  - 6 qt. model? ""

 

I have that same model ion my basement

 

i have the box   

 

used once

 

stop by and pick it up

 

one bottle of table wine , no oak from TJ's would be appreciated.

 

 

suprise.gif

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I have a Kuhn Rikon of similar vintage used perhaps three times. However for candy makers and chocolatiers they make the perfect Caramel pan 

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I have a Fagor Duo that came with 4 qt and 8 qt pans.  They are nice heavy saucepans that I use frequently and the glass lid for them also fits the Instant Pot, so I'm not getting rid of them even if I don't use them for pressure cooking.

I used the 8 qt for stock once or twice after I got the IP but the need to fiddle with the gas to maintain proper heat isn't worth the extra volume of stock. 

 

I'll also mention here that I've chatted up the Instant Pot to a quite a number of friends.  Those who already use pressure cookers understand the value of hands-off pressure cooking and are usually quick converts.  

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I have two Fisslers and wish I had a 10 quart one.  Unless I am mistaken you can't just put an Instant Pot under the faucet for rapid cooling.

 

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 Carrying a hot, heavy pressure cooker to the sink was never my idea of a fun way to spend my time.  The purpose, as far as I recall, was simply to drop the pressure quickly so the lid could be removed. With the electric pressure cooker I use the valve to accomplish the same thing. It is noisy and it requires some care to avoid a steam burn but so does carrying a heavy, hot pressure cooker to the sink.   Pick your demons!  A stovetop pressure cooker might get used twice a year in my house but the Instant Pot gets used at least once or twice a week.  To each their own.:)

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6 hours ago, Anna N said:

 Carrying a hot, heavy pressure cooker to the sink was never my idea of a fun way to spend my time.  The purpose, as far as I recall, was simply to drop the pressure quickly so the lid could be removed. With the electric pressure cooker I use the valve to accomplish the same thing. It is noisy and it requires some care to avoid a steam burn but so does carrying a heavy, hot pressure cooker to the sink.   Pick your demons!  A stovetop pressure cooker might get used twice a year in my house but the Instant Pot gets used at least once or twice a week.  To each their own.:)

 

The two ways of rapid cooling have different results.  Venting causes boiling.

 

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Yes and Yes w a bit of No

 

boiling is irrelevant for many things the iP excels at :

 

Pressure-Steaming.

 

those items that Foam Up  :  Beans ? Rice ?  .... ?

 

you take that into account when you set the the iPot.

 

the push-button easy  with unattended cooking

 

make the iPot well worth the investment

 

hopefully on sale.

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7 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The two ways of rapid cooling have different results.  Venting causes boiling.

 

Thanks, I did not know that!

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2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The two ways of rapid cooling have different results.  Venting causes boiling.

 

 

2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

The two ways of rapid cooling have different results.  Venting causes boiling.

 

As I said to each their own.

 

Our own @pazzaglia does not recommend using the cold water method link. And my stovetop manual has a number of warnings about this method too. 

It is very rarely relevant.  But if it matters to you then by all means stick with the stovetop pressure cooker.:)  It would be such a boring world if we were all the same.  

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7 hours ago, Anna N said:

 

As I said to each their own.

 

Our own @pazzaglia does not recommend using the cold water method link. And my stovetop manual has a number of warnings about this method too. 

It is very rarely relevant.  But if it matters to you then by all means stick with the stovetop pressure cooker.:)  It would be such a boring world if we were all the same.  

 

She certainly used to recommend it and my Fisslers are certainly not aluminum.  I've never had a problem, unlike with quick release.  Possibly @pazzaglia will step in here.

 

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21 hours ago, Anna N said:

 

As I said to each their own.

 

Our own @pazzaglia does not recommend using the cold water method link. And my stovetop manual has a number of warnings about this method too. 

It is very rarely relevant.  But if it matters to you then by all means stick with the stovetop pressure cooker.:)  It would be such a boring world if we were all the same.  

As most of you know by now, I don't own an instant pot. I own a Chinese knockoff that came with directions that were indecipherable gobbledygook. While I was searching for some direction on the internet that would help me decide whether to even keep it, I came across eGullet. To begin with, I thought I had just purchased an electric pressure cooker. After reading everything that was written here, I realized that I had gotten a treasure. Everyone here has encouraged me, inspired me, and just, generally, put me in awe of all of the wonderful things that you were doing with them. No one, here, is ever going to convince me to go back to a regular electric pressure cooker much less a stovetop pressure cooker. First, I'm scared to death of them and second, I'm much too old to be carting around a heavy time bomb.

One thing that I have learned is the importance of pressure release. Now that I know the different effect that it has on the type of food being cooked I try to always use the method recommended for that food. To do this, I have done quite a bit of research. The link that Anna N gives is probably the most thorough and succinct of all the information that I have come across. It is well worth reading, both for safety information and how to achieve the very best results for whatever food you are cooking.

One interesting bit of information that I came across was what happens inside the stove top pressure cooker when you pour water on the lid. Due to the general physics of the whole thing, it boils. Read the fifth comment down by RebelWithoutAClue.


Edited by Tropicalsenior Self editing (log)
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