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liuzhou

Fruit

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1 hour ago, lindag said:

Actually I bought that juicer because I watched Ms Garten use it.  And, yes, it is quite noisy but very efficient and space saving.  I also have the big-ass Breville juicer which is very nice but a space hog.  I use my little Braun most of the time since it stores so easily.

BTW, that Braun was dirt cheap but I don't think it's available any longer.

 

Is the Braun the one that Ina used? Whatever she used is no longer available, but apparently this is a really close match:

https://www.cassandraskitchen.com/products/all-citrus-juicer

 

My little B&D has similar measurements. About six inches in diameter and nine inches at its tallest point. It's lightweight so easy to get in and out of a cupboard. It will do anything from small limes right up to large grapefruit and it cost me maybe $15 or so. I have a real fondness for it, homely and noisy as it may be.   🙂

 

@Toliver, the juice really is lovely. We're having Screwdrivers for our NYE cocktails, I think! 🥃🍹🎉🎇

 

 

 

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This morning, I found the first of a big favourite of mine for this year.

 

Chinese bayberries (Myrica rubra).

 

杨梅 (Mandarin: yáng méi)

 

1521704260_yangmei.thumb.jpg.f129851c343a9d8ab295540a3bb0ac97.jpg

 

Grape-sized. Juicy and sweet, with a slightly tart after-note.  We get them preserved year round, but the fresh ones are something else entirely.

 

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Those are really pretty, they look like bejeweled Christmas balls. Can you cut one open?

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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7 hours ago, BeeZee said:

Those are really pretty, they look like bejeweled Christmas balls. Can you cut one open?

 

Not easily.

 

They are stainers and the flesh clings tenaciously to the internal seed. But I did my best.

 

open.thumb.jpg.67d5fbcf99678b2024d9a2124706cf75.jpg

 

I think this is the first time I've seen inside one. Normally, they are just popped into the mouth and the juice and flesh removed with the tongue and teeth, before ditching the seed.

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Vibrant! Thank you.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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The strawberries are here! The strawberries are here! Well, technically they're coming from central Wisconsin, 100 or so miles away from me, but the farmers' representatives are starting to drive them up for sale here. I'm buying and eating them as fast as I can. I was so excited that I posted them in the Breakfast topic this morning, and my breakfasts are usually not photo-worthy.

 

I snagged a half-flat of them (about 3 quarts) a couple of days ago and am storing them in the outside refrigerator,

 

20190705_112019.jpg

 

bringing in what I'll need for the day.

 

20190705_112232.jpg

 

The other eagerly-awaited bounty is decent stone fruit, currently from California. My darling doesn't care if he buys a peach-colored piece of styrofoam from Chile, but I do. These nectarines and peaches actually smell and taste like nectarines and peaches. 

 

20190705_113843.jpg

 

Oh, we are lucky at this time of year!

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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20190704_115455.thumb.jpg.be26be7a9936327b2068a74637401c04.jpg

Oh mangosteens, how I've missed thee!!! And, unfortunately, you'll be absent from my life now for another year (at minimum)

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This morning's find.

Prunus persica var. platycarpa, commonly known as the flat peach, doughnut peach or Saturn peach. In Chinese, 蟠桃 (Pinyin: pán táo, literally 'coiled peach'). These samples are from Xinjiang province.

 

1322903986_xinjiangpantao.thumb.jpg.72ff39e6874cff3abc665362e8e00e2a.jpg

 

Quote

The fruit made a significant appearance in the 16th-century novel Journey to the West*, in which the Jade Emperor tasks Wukong to take charge of the Pan Tao Yuan ('Coiled Peaches Garden'). Later on, Wukong eats most of the rarer species of fruit in the garden and gains eternal life.

Wikipedia

 

* The Monkey King story.

 

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Interesting.  I have never seen a peach that has (what appears to be) smooth skin.

 

Every peach I have seen (and we have doughnut peaches here) has a soft fuzz.

 

This almost looks more like a flat nectarine!

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5 hours ago, TicTac said:

Interesting.  I have never seen a peach that has (what appears to be) smooth skin.

 

Every peach I have seen (and we have doughnut peaches here) has a soft fuzz.

 

This almost looks more like a flat nectarine!

 

But for the pink outer husk.

 

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On 7/30/2019 at 1:52 AM, liuzhou said:

This morning's find.

Prunus persica var. platycarpa, commonly known as the flat peach, doughnut peach or Saturn peach. In Chinese, 蟠桃 (Pinyin: pán táo, literally 'coiled peach'). These samples are from Xinjiang province.

 

1322903986_xinjiangpantao.thumb.jpg.72ff39e6874cff3abc665362e8e00e2a.jpg

 

 

* The Monkey King story.

 

The local guy told me these are JUST getting ready to harvest here.  Right now they are picking yellow and whites.  

Another farmer said, because of the cool and rain earlier in the spring, his melons are running a few weeks behind.   

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Posted (edited)

I have on hand peaches, watermelon, canteloupe, apples, bananas (both fresh and overripe ones I just peeled, stuck in a plastic bag and chunked in the freezer) and I think I still have a few blueberries hanging out in the fridge.  We are in high peach season here, and Arkansas grows some wonderful ones. 

 

Shameful admission: I dearly love a fruit dip my late sainted mother-in-law taught me to make. It's a block of cream cheese, a small jar of marshmallow cream, and the juice of a lime. It is ungodly good on fresh fruit. I may or may not have a half-recipe of it left in the fridge. 


Edited by kayb (log)
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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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3 minutes ago, kayb said:

I have on hand peaches, watermelon, canteloupe, apples, bananas (both fresh and overripe ones I just peeled, stuck in a plastic bag and chunked in the freezer) and I think I still have a few blueberries hanging out in the fridge.  We are in high peach season here, and Arkansas grows some wonderful ones. 

 

Shameful admission: I dearly love a fruit dip my late sainted mother-in-law taught me to make. It's a block of cream cheese, a small jar of marshmallow cream, and the juice of a lime. It is ungodly good on fresh fruit. I may or may not have a half-recipe of it left in the fridge. 

 

Show us photos.


eGullet member #80.

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20 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Well the difference between peaches and nectarines is just a commercial marketing point. They are the same species. 

Interesting.   I find tremendous differences in the flavor between peach varieties, and certainly as well between nectarine varieties.    Maybe it's just our local micro-climates as well as varietal distinctions. 

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eGullet member #80.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Interesting.   I find tremendous differences in the flavor between peach varieties, and certainly as well between nectarine varieties.    Maybe it's just our local micro-climates as well as varietal distinctions. 

 

You could say the same about many fruits. There are all sorts of flavours in apples, but apples is still apples.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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