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blue_dolphin

Lunch! What'd ya have? (2017)

495 posts in this topic

@HungryChris  

 

thank's for reminding me

 

guess Ill have to motor up to Ipswich 

 

and go down the 

 

Rt. 133 trail for some Clams w bellies  

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Birthday lunch celebration at a local restaurant today; the one I'd picked whose website said it was open for Sunday brunch was, in fact, not, so we crossed the street and went to another. I had crab cakes benedict, on a biscuit, and except for the preponderance of bell pepper in the crab cakes, it was quite excellent. Other chose chicken benedicts (what it sounds like, with a nicely breaded and fried chicken filet) and one with sausage, while the vegetarian in the group had a Florentine omelet. 

 

I had a couple of mimosas and I always find two leaves me wanting more. I had Prosecco, but no orange juice; however, I DID have pomegranate juice. So I am having a pomosa. Found it a bit too intense with just pom and champagne, so I added a bit of sparkling water. Worked.

 

I may have two or three more for dinner.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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17 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@HungryChris  

 

thank's for reminding me

 

guess Ill have to motor up to Ipswich 

 

and go down the 

 

Rt. 133 trail for some Clams w bellies  

One of the first road trips Deb and I ever made was up to Woodman's, where the fried clam was supposedly first created and shortly after that, the Clam Box and then to Essex Seafood. Those are the hub of what we think of in good fried clams, but they all have their good and bad days and luck is always part of the trip. After that we started searching out places closer that could do it well, and today was a find. Many local places have been given the "wave-off".

I worked one summer in a seafood market and would deliver fresh fry clams to local places. The prices in July would vary wildly and sometimes I would almost get chased out of places because the price had shot up so much. They would buy them and freeze them to protect themselves and the product would suffer terribly. Fresh is always best.

@Shelby, the fried clam you want in KA is probably like the live crawfish I want here in CT.

We have a cruise out of NOLA scheduled for next spring and I will make sure I get my crawfish fix checked off there.

HC

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@kayb happy birthday!  Enjoy that prosecco!

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Lunch part 2. Austrian theme continued.

 

"Potato cheese"

TmECATG.jpg

 

Liptauer is a cheese spread with paprika powder.

vO7GssU.jpg

 

Used Hungarian paprika I brought back from there last christmas.

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Not your typical "pancakes". It's torn and the batter is different. And it's Austrian.

0Z6VzI8.jpg

 

Contains no baking powder. Beaten egg whites are responsible for the fluffiness. Always a kind of fruit compote alongside.

ezFULcJ.jpg

 

Austrians have different names for similar dishes or things. In Germany this is called "farmer's breakfast". One of the most typical meals in both countries.

HJZmfCJ.jpg

 

Want to learn a saying in German? "Without cheese, without Speck; life has no meaning." The cheese can be changed to bread or ham etc but Speck will remain. Speck is an important ingredient in this part of the world. Besides, the words Speck and "meaning" in the second line rhyme.

zOBkcId.jpg

 

This one is all mine. Butter from the sea.

Ja8rRvU.jpg

 

Two of my top spring elixirs in 1 photo.

Jop2Y2h.jpg

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image.thumb.jpeg.868204aeecdadeae9a90d9ecd6812ae3.jpeg

 

 Might be lunch. Might be dinner. Might serve as both.  If you have never considered cooking lettuce you have missed out.   It is also the perfect way to avoid waste because you can use lettuce that is not in prime condition. Grilled romaine, grilled radicchio are like very different vegetables than when raw.  This particular recipe called for iceberg lettuce but I think it worked perfectly well with romaine.  Asian cuisine it's much less reluctant to cook salads greens  then those of us raised in the Western tradition. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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14 hours ago, Anna N said:

  Asian cuisine it's much less reluctant to cook salads greens  then those of us raised in the Western tradition. 

 

I'd say it goes beyond that. Not cooking any vegetable is considered perverse. The category of "salad vegetable" doesn't exist.

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image.jpeg.87f4cccf7c453e29607ec506a55abe70.jpeg

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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@Anna N  

 

those mushrooms look superb

 

so what is dry-frying   ( I can guess )

 

and how do you get the colo(u)r  all around them w/o them giving up their jus and shriveling  ?

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Oh, look, I have a few littlenecks left over from dinner, and I just happen to have a bit of cocktail sauce. Not much, but it's a start.

HC

IMG_0109.thumb.JPG.c5a90a65c560b0a9bf77d056ed9beb94.JPG

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

@Anna N  

 

those mushrooms look superb

 

so what is dry-frying   ( I can guess )

 

and how do you get the colo(u)r  all around them w/o them giving up their jus and shriveling  ?

 Thank you.  This time I put them in a dry cast-iron frypan (sometimes I use one of my Darto pans), all gill side down, fry them on fairly high heat, then turn them gill side up and keep doing this until I'm happy with the result. I know some people go much further so that they are devoid of any moisture but I like them like this. When I am satisfied with their color, I add about a tablespoon of butter to the pan, toss them about it a bit, season them with salt and pepper and serve them. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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@Anna N  

 

Nice !

 

Ill try that soon w my Darto

 

Im sure the butter does elevated them

 

thanks. 

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17 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 Thank you.  This time I put them in a dry cast-iron frypan (sometimes I use one of my Darto pans), all gill side down, fry them on fairly high heat, then turn them gill side up and keep doing this until I'm happy with the result. I know some people go much further so that they are devoid of any moisture but I like them like this. When I am satisfied with their color, I add about a tablespoon of butter to the pan, toss them about it a bit, season them with salt and pepper and serve them. 

That's the way I like to cook my brown mushrooms...I think I first read about it from Jacques P.  I also add a little squeeze of lemon juice and a few drops of truffle oil to the melting butter.

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On 6/26/2017 at 10:45 AM, BonVivant said:

Not your typical "pancakes". It's torn and the batter is different. And it's Austrian.

0Z6VzI8.jpg

 

Kaiserschmarrn happen to be on my menu this weekend as well :) Already got a few over ripe plums in the fridge waiting to be sauced.


~ Shai N.

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30 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

That's the way I like to cook my brown mushrooms...I think I first read about it from Jacques P.  I also add a little squeeze of lemon juice and a few drops of truffle oil to the melting butter.

The lemon juice I will go along with. In fact I intended to give them a squeeze this morning but the truffle oil - NAH. I am such a cheap date.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Very late lunch:  Tagliatelle with walnuts & lemon from Ottolenghi's Plenty More.  Essentially the same as this online recipe for tagliolini with walnuts & lemon.

IMG_5646.thumb.jpg.f02822940f09dba1f8653636b77a4b05.jpg
Deviations: I used Trader Joe's lemon pepper pappardelle instead of tagliatelle and added some sugar snap peas and yellow bell pepper. 
I like the way the browned butter and sage work with the walnuts. It reminded me a little of the linguine all'amalfitana from Diana Henry's Simple, which I prefer because ... garlic, red chile and anchovies :x

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5 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

Very late lunch:  Tagliatelle with walnuts & lemon from Ottolenghi's Plenty More.

 

The Ottolenghi dishes have been looking fabulous!  I have the Plenty ebook (picked it up when it was available for $3.99) but haven't cooked from it yet.  Which book do you like more?

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