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Lunch 2023


liuzhou

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14 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

Recipe for that potato dish, please? Looks delicious! (So does the Leberkase, but I doubt I'd ever try making it.)

 

4 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:
15 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

Don't cut it short. I've made it several times and it is well worth making.

@Duvel yes please. I Googled the recipes and they are all in German. My German is pretty rusty. Those potatoes look wonderful

 

You peel and cube (maybe 1/2 inch) some potatoes, preferably the “mainly waxy type”. Boil in quite salty water - this is the only salt you add. When almost done, take out, drain and let cool down (at least 30 min). The residual heat will cook it to the point.

 

Heat some animal fat (duck, goose, chicken - all good. I used beef today). Fry the cubes at medium heat to get a light crust. Move to one side in the pan, sprinkle a tablespoon of chopped fresh rosemary on top. In the “empty” side of the pan add one teaspoon of animal fat, add one some finely chopped garlic (amount depending on the vampire threat level of your area) and fry a bit. Flip the potatoes and the rosemary on top of the garlic, mix well and fry for a minute longer. Potatoes should have a light and flavorful crust and should be creamy inside.

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@Steve Irby

 

im  not a fan of N.O. cuisine 

 

celery is one thing

 

and GBP's are a disease.

 

I have made NO style roux  several time

 

and enjoyed the color changes .

 

Rice and Gravy ?

 

you betcha

 

your gumbo above 

 

looks like something Id 

 

enjoy , almost inhaling 

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As you know, I also loathe GBP’s, but I love Cajun food. When I make it, I sub red BPs for the Green, or some sort of sweet yellow pepper (Cubanelles are my fav), and cut down on the celery. Works.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Smacked vegetables with feta and dill from I Dream of Dinner with a jammy egg.  The vegetables are cauliflower, green beans and watermelon radishes. Dressing is feta mashed with lemon juice and zest, Dijon mustard and olive oil. 

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@Smithy tipped me off to this recipe when she used it with green beans but was reluctant to smack them and create a mess.  I was in a smacking mood myself so I went ahead and smacked the green beans and radishes per the recipe.  I put them on a piece of parchment and folded it over to contain any flying bits.  I was fine with the raw beans and radishes but would have preferred the cauliflower steamed briefly.  The dressing was excellent and would work with all sorts of vegetables.

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56 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Smacked vegetables with feta and dill from I Dream of Dinner with a jammy egg.  The vegetables are cauliflower, green beans and watermelon radishes. Dressing is feta mashed with lemon juice and zest, Dijon mustard and olive oil. 

90F4728E-C780-4773-8F77-6136CD4BBF5B_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.0032a1ffc84e818b9ef5ce27ec73a122.jpeg

 

@Smithy tipped me off to this recipe when she used it with green beans but was reluctant to smack them and create a mess.  I was in a smacking mood myself so I went ahead and smacked the green beans and radishes per the recipe.  I put them on a piece of parchment and folded it over to contain any flying bits.  I was fine with the raw beans and radishes but would have preferred the cauliflower steamed briefly.  The dressing was excellent and would work with all sorts of vegetables.

 

How did you achieve the egg?

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

Whatever you crave, there's a dumpling for you. -- Hsiao-Ching Chou

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On 1/27/2023 at 7:23 AM, kayb said:

As you know, I also loathe GBP’s, but I love Cajun food. When I make it, I sub red BPs for the Green, or some sort of sweet yellow pepper (Cubanelles are my fav), and cut down on the celery. Works.

I too dislike bell peppers, but if I'm making something like red beans and rice, and the beans have to cook for two hours or more after the trinity has been sautéed, I wouldn't have a clue what happened to the green bell pepper. I assume it's done its job contributing to the flavor of the final dish. Any situation in which the green bells retains their shape and distinct flavor I'd rather avoid them entirely. 

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21 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

I assume it's done its job contributing to the flavor of the final dish.

 

 

Green bell peppers contributing flavour? Can I interest you in a broken bridge? Only one previous owner,

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

"No amount of evidence will ever persuade an idiot"
Mark Twain

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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13 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Yet the white looks fully set?

 

I was taught this method by someone who was making the eggs in the Ramen place although it was 6 1/2 minutes rather than seven!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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9 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I was taught this method by someone who was making the eggs in the Ramen place although it was 6 1/2 minutes rather than seven!


I also do 6.5 min ones for ramen, but I have gone to 5.5 min eggs for some applications. Even in those the whites are fully set.

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14 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Yet the white looks fully set?

 

Yes.  In my hands, with large eggs direct from the fridge, 7 min gives a fully set white and jammmy, slightly runny yolk. 
6.5 min is my go-to for a runnier yolk. Usually the white is fully set but sometimes there’s a tiny bit that's not quite there but little enough that I can ignore it. 

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35 minutes ago, Duvel said:


In my case as well.

Yep. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Cue The Three Degrees' "When Will I See You Again"

 

Dumplings (filled with beef mince, Speck and calf's liver)
pDwtYkM.jpg

 

Prawn roe brought back from Hong Kong
ePvbW6W.jpg

 

Froze the roe in small portions. They only need a quick toss in a hot wok/pan to release the intense prawny taste.
3VAuYxH.jpg

 

Egg-tomato soup and steamed chard (Turkish market probably sources green house chard)
GbA3iFR.jpg

 

And a Belgian beer
uj0m5Ku.jpg

 

Are we in love or just friends?
When will I see you again, Hong Kong and Macau?

 

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34 minutes ago, BonVivant said:

Cue The Three Degrees' "When Will I See You Again"

 

Dumplings (filled with beef mince, Speck and calf's liver)
pDwtYkM.jpg

 

Prawn roe brought back from Hong Kong
ePvbW6W.jpg

 

Froze the roe in small portions. They only need a quick toss in a hot wok/pan to release the intense prawny taste.
3VAuYxH.jpg

 

Egg-tomato soup and steamed chard (Turkish market probably sources green house chard)
GbA3iFR.jpg

 

And a Belgian beer
uj0m5Ku.jpg

 

Are we in love or just friends?
When will I see you again, Hong Kong and Macau?

 

Do you make the dumplings yourself?  I never saw that combination in Hong Kong or Beijing before!

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More Yellowfin tuna. Seared in coconut oil, with tsukemono and house made ponzu

 

 

IMG_20230130_134536750_HDR~2.jpg

Edited by johnnyd (log)
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"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

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15 minutes ago, johnnyd said:

More Yellowfin tuna. Seared in coconut oil, with tsukemono and house made ponzu

 

 

IMG_20230130_134536750_HDR~2.jpg

Lucky you. Is that pickled young ginger at the bottom?

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Another Korean American riff.  This time it's the recipe for Salt and Pepper Pork Chops with Vinegared Scallions made with swordfish instead of pork chop. 

6533F826-C9EC-4715-98E8-32B7D8C5A4B7_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.7355dab8cc9ffa0079628edae103bba1.jpeg

Also, charred cauliflower and broccolini with gochugaru dust from the same book and brown rice.

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Sweet potato wedges with goma dare and crispy tofu from Ottolenghi's Extra Good Things.

8443FBBB-8DAD-45A8-AB01-4E81A7B4E76F_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.3997aa50fce19a2b9d4b22ca2a34352c.jpeg

Oh my, this is really good.  The crispy tofu is the "Extra Good Thing" about this recipe and is what intrigued me.  This is not tofu that purports to have an crispy exterior.  These are crispy/crunchy/salty tofu bits.  Extra firm tofu is grated on the largest holes of a box grater, tossed with cornstarch, Aleppo pepper, salt and a little olive oil, and spread on a parchment-lined baking sheet.  It gets baked for 30 min, tossed with a bit of soy sauce and returned to the oven to re-crisp.  Supposedly these crispy bits keep for several days. 

The recipe is efficiently written as the sweet potatoes then go into the oven to roast on the shelf below the tofu.  While that happens, you make an Aleppo chili-infused olive oil with sweet smoked paprika and sesame oil and mix up the goma dare, described as a Japanese sesame-based condiment used as a dip or dressing.  Ground, toasted sesame seeds, get mixed with Kewpie mayo (I used regular mayo), soy sauce, rice wine vinegar and a little maple syrup  That stuff is delicious but the combination of roasted sweet potato wedges, topped with the goma dare, a drizzle of the chili oil and a sprinkle of the crispy tofu is a winner.  

 

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@blue_dolphin Wow I may not make the entire recipe with the sweet potatoes but will definitely try that tofu crisp method. Thank you!  I've always enjoyed the crisoy bit that happen when I move baking

tofu around on the sheet pan and that has been medium not firm. Will play - love the inspiration I get here.

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