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Absurdly, stupidly basic cooking questions (Part 2)


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On 5/21/2024 at 4:10 AM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I would like to make a meatloaf.  I have never made a meatloaf.  I have parsley, onions, and a two pound chuck roast.  What absolute beginner stuff should I know about making meatloaf?

 

 

I recently went through the same experience. At least if I have made meatloaf I can't remember when, although I remember using my hands to goosh the eggs and cornflakes into the meat for my mother when I was a kid.

 

I somewhat followed a recipe that suggested grating the onions help for moisture and used panko, which is good because I never have bread crumbs... or cornflakes. Then I took the suggestion from somewhere else to line the loaf pan with baking paper to lift the loaf out for cutting. It tasted very nice but was a little too moist and kind of falling apart. Less onion next time.

 

We do have a Meatloaf topic (last post 2017) and a Burger/Meatloaf Cookoff

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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15 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

The pan was twenty some dollars when I got it, now the price is up to $44!

 

This is one of the few times when something is LESS expensive on Amazon Canada. It looks like exactly the same pan (same model #) and is $33.99 Canadian which is just under $25 US.

 

Here is the listing link.

 

 

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21 hours ago, haresfur said:

 

I recently went through the same experience. At least if I have made meatloaf I can't remember when, although I remember using my hands to goosh the eggs and cornflakes into the meat for my mother when I was a kid.

 

I somewhat followed a recipe that suggested grating the onions help for moisture and used panko, which is good because I never have bread crumbs... or cornflakes. Then I took the suggestion from somewhere else to line the loaf pan with baking paper to lift the loaf out for cutting. It tasted very nice but was a little too moist and kind of falling apart. Less onion next time.

 

We do have a Meatloaf topic (last post 2017) and a Burger/Meatloaf Cookoff

 

The recipe you linked is the one I had planned to try.  Did the pan you used have a perforated insert?

 

Some months ago I was/am feeling overwhelmed and stopped reading the cooking forum entirely.  However I shall try to at least skim the meatloaf topic posts.  I notice Fat Guy recommended using a loaf pan with a rack insert.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

Whatever you crave, there's a dumpling for you. -- Hsiao-Ching Chou

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4 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The recipe you linked is the one I had planned to try.  Did the pan you used have a perforated insert?

 

Some months ago I was/am feeling overwhelmed and stopped reading the cooking forum entirely.  However I shall try to at least skim the meatloaf topic posts.  I notice Fat Guy recommended using a loaf pan with a rack insert.

 

No insert. That's what the baking paper is for.

 

I think I just put tomato paste on top instead of their overly sweet looking ketchup and sugar and whatever. I probably will skip the glaze altogether next time. No thyme or bouillon either, because I don't have any.

 

I blitzed the onion in the mini-processor attachment for my stick blender instead of grating. 

 

Eager to see your results.

Edited by haresfur
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On 5/20/2024 at 11:10 AM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I would like to make a meatloaf.  I have never made a meatloaf.  I have parsley, onions, and a two pound chuck roast.  What absolute beginner stuff should I know about making meatloaf?

 

I go to a local butcher whom I trust and buy raw meatloaf by the pound.    Not cheap today, about $14 a pound, but totally reliable and delicious.    Husband has told me not to quit my day job after eating most of my from-scratch creations.     Not bad but not as good as Bryan's.     My method is no-fail!!

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eGullet member #80.

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The meatloaf was not getting made by itself, and the chuck roast was beginning to show its age.  Last night I got home from work around 8:30.  Put the grinder parts in the freezer.  Grated the onion, minced the garlic, beat the eggs.  Chopped the parsley.  Started grinding the meat at midnight.

 

Meatloaf went in the Anova at 1:00, 176C, 40% steam.  Last 20 minutes with top element on as well.  Total bake time 75 minutes.

 

MeatloafAssembled05292024.jpg

 

MeatloafSlice05292024.jpg

 

 

House Special Glazed Meatloaf from Nagi Maehashi's Recipetin Eats Dinner pp 32,33.  I omitted the ketchup glaze and covered the loaf with bacon and brown sugar.

 

Thanks everyone for the help.  I would not have believed how good this was -- and indeed still is.  Plan is to mash potatoes to go with more meatloaf for tonight.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

Whatever you crave, there's a dumpling for you. -- Hsiao-Ching Chou

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  • 3 weeks later...

I want to make posset for dessert.  Everything I've seen calls for whipping cream.  I would like to make a lower (not low) calorie version and wonder if I could use, say, 18% cream I stead of 35%?  I imagine it would not set as well as using 35% cream so can I thicken it with the addition of cornstarch?

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11 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

I want to make posset for dessert.  Everything I've seen calls for whipping cream.  I would like to make a lower (not low) calorie version and wonder if I could use, say, 18% cream I stead of 35%?  I imagine it would not set as well as using 35% cream so can I thicken it with the addition of cornstarch?

 

I don't know (I really don't) about cornstarch, but I think gelatin would work well for that purpose.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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@Smithy's mention of using gelatin reminded me of this mango pudding recipe that I have. I have also made this using pureed strawberries and a passion fruit nectar that I can buy here.

This makes about six small servings but I usually cut the recipe in half.

 

Mango Pudding

 

2 envelopes unflavoured gelatin

1/2 to 3/4 cup sugar

1 cup water

3 cups pureed fresh mangoes

1 cup evaporated milk

1 tbsp lemon juice, optional

Lime wedges, for garnish, (optional)

Fresh mango slices for garnish, (optional)

 

Dissolve gelatin in 1/2 cup cold water. Add 1/2 cup of boiling water and whisk well. add sugar and whisk until dissolved. In a large bowl mix mango puree, evaporated milk and gelatin mixture. Add lemon juice if desired. Pour into a large bowl or an 8 by 8 pan.

Note: You will need 3 ripe mangoes, weighing at least 12 ounces. 

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2 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

@Smithy's mention of using gelatin reminded me of this mango pudding recipe that I have. I have also made this using pureed strawberries and a passion fruit nectar that I can buy here.

This makes about six small servings but I usually cut the recipe in half.

 

Mango Pudding

 

2 envelopes unflavoured gelatin

1/2 to 3/4 cup sugar

1 cup water

3 cups pureed fresh mangoes

1 cup evaporated milk

1 tbsp lemon juice, optional

Lime wedges, for garnish, (optional)

Fresh mango slices for garnish, (optional)

 

Dissolve gelatin in 1/2 cup cold water. Add 1/2 cup of boiling water and whisk well. add sugar and whisk until dissolved. In a large bowl mix mango puree, evaporated milk and gelatin mixture. Add lemon juice if desired. Pour into a large bowl or an 8 by 8 pan.

Note: You will need 3 ripe mangoes, weighing at least 12 ounces. 

 

I saw a recipe resembling this but I loathe evapourated milk so I passed it over.  But, I'm saving the recipe and I'll look into subs for evapourated milk.  Condensed maybe?

 

@Smithy i made up a batch of strawberry posset using gelatin and 10% cream.  I meant to buy 18% cream but I forgot. We'll see how it turns out.  There is a Mexican grocery store not far from here and they sell various fruit purees like these that I have in the freezer at the moment.  I also have a puree of the same brand called winter Tree/Tomato, does anyone know what that i?

20240614_155430.jpg

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@ElsieD I think that you could just use whole milk if you want to. I have substituted in the following recipe and it has worked out just fine. This is a nice light dessert to serve with Chinese food and I usually serve it with mango.

 

Almond Jelly with Fruit

3 cups cold water

2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin powder

½ cup sugar

1 can evaporated milk, 14oz.

2 teaspoons almond extract

2 cups fresh or macerated fruit (to serve)

In a large glass measuring pitcher, heat the water in the microwave until it boils. Stir in the gelatin and sugar and stir until it is completely disolved. Stir in milk and almond extract. Pour into a 9 x 9" pan (or individual serving cups if desired). Allow to cool. Cover and refrigerate until set, 3 hours. 

To Serve - Cut jelly into 1" cubes and place in individual bowls. Top with fresh or macerated fruit of your choice. Serve chilled. 

(Optional) Top with a splash of ginger syrup to taste. 

 

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59 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Tree/Tomato

They have tree Tomatoes here all the time. I don't use them but then I've only tasted them once or twice. They have a hard shell and you have to scoop them out. I can only describe the taste as kind of like a tomato but with a citrusy note.

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1 hour ago, Tropicalsenior said:

They have tree Tomatoes here all the time. I don't use them but then I've only tasted them once or twice. They have a hard shell and you have to scoop them out. I can only describe the taste as kind of like a tomato but with a citrusy note.

Can I make ice cream with it?

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1 minute ago, ElsieD said:

Can I make ice cream with it?

Interesting question. Like I said I've only tasted them a couple times and I don't really remember much about them. I do know that they are in the market all the time. I'll see if there are any tomorrow when I go shopping and pick up a couple. I'll give them a taste and let you know what I think.

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