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snowangel

Dinner II: The Gallery of Regrettable Foods (Part 2)

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Fun thread!

My attempt in genetic engineering:

dcarch

porgiea.jpg

Wow! that is just creepy.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I made this for lunch tomorrow, and I knew as soon as it was finished I had to report it here.

gallery_41378_6780_146104.jpg

Turmeric: meet red cabbage. Red cabbage: meet turmeric. Lunch: meet Gallery of Regrettable Food. My camera can't even capture the Prussian blue-meets-yellow ochre matte horror of this dish.

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The colors would be subtle and beautiful if in a leaf mat on a stream bottom and not on a plate.

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I made this for lunch tomorrow, and I knew as soon as it was finished I had to report it here.

gallery_41378_6780_146104.jpg

Turmeric: meet red cabbage. Red cabbage: meet turmeric. Lunch: meet Gallery of Regrettable Food. My camera can't even capture the Prussian blue-meets-yellow ochre matte horror of this dish.

But Erin, how did it TASTE? :laugh:


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Actually really good, as I'd let the cabbage crisp up in the pan, and it made it quite sweet. I actually garnished with fresh chopped cilantro, which helped a little, too. Mixed in with the rice, it wasn't as horrifying.

But yeah, it did look like a stream bed.

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This little beauty was delicious (black sesame filling), but everytime I see this picture, I think of this thread, so here it is.2012-03-28 download 015.jpg


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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yam (rice dough)


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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This was beef stroganstuff (not quite a true stroganoff - no cream); delicious, but it looks kind of like cat yukk with noodles in it.... Try as I might I couldn't get a flattering photo of it. The peas are particularly unfortunate, I think.

IMG_0100.jpg


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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I am so happy this thread came back to life!


Brenda

I whistfully mentioned how I missed sushi. Truly horrified, she told me "you city folk eat the strangest things!", and offered me a freshly fried chitterling!

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This was beef stroganstuff (not quite a true stroganoff - no cream); delicious, but it looks kind of like cat yukk with noodles in it.... Try as I might I couldn't get a flattering photo of it. The peas are particularly unfortunate, I think.

IMG_0100.jpg

Cat yukk is perfect. Hope it tasted good!

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It doesn't look so bad! What did you use in place of the sour cream?


Edited by ambra (log)

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Thin sour yogurt (the type sold here for use in smoothies; it has the consistency of thick cream. If you simmer it low enough, this doesn't curdle or separate the way that sour cream does.) It's also much easier on Mom; since she hasn't got a gallbladder, it's hard for her to process the amount of fat that sour cream or nata plus a squeeze of lime implies.

It also means, of course, that I can't really call it Stroganoff. Since it's essentially a variation on what my family calls "stuff in a pan" it was christened Stroganstuff - it's close enough ideologically, if not ingredients-wise....


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Thanks for the info!!! Stroganstuff might hit a table near me sooner than later. ;)

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This little beauty was delicious (black sesame filling), but everytime I see this picture, I think of this thread, so here it is.2012-03-28 download 015.jpg

I think he's kinda cute...imagine him with beady little eyes. :raz:

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Fun thread!

My attempt in genetic engineering:

dcarch

porgiea.jpg

Well, if we're talking about attempts at genetic engineering . . .

IMG_3049_1.JPG

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OK, I haven't made this but I had to share. A 1930s Canadian charity cookbook has a sandwich filling recipe that is: 2 bananas mashed, 3 strips cooked bacon, crumbled, 3 hardboiled egg yolks mashed, mayo to moisten, paprika.

My husband wants to try it. The thought of it just makes me gag. What say you? :raz:

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Just had one yesterday for dinner. My mother wanted to cook shrimp scampi. Her recipe called for pasta, sauteed shrimp, a dozen cloves of garlic and white wine. She didn't want to use the wine, so she found an alternative. Somewhere on the Internet it said that apple cider vinegar was a good substitute for white wine. After the shrimp were sauteed, she dumped a cup of apple cider vinegar on them -- and that and the garlic made the 'sauce' to pour over the pasta. It was a sad end for those poor innocent shrimp, but on a good note -- I had no problem staying on my diet. :wink:

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I was despirate for lunch... I pulled out a Tofurky sun dried tomato Italian sausage (disturbingly good on its own) split it down the middle, and layed one of my daughters mozarella cheese sticks in the middle. I nuked the whole thing until the cheese was melted and the sausage was hot... I ate it on a slice of bread with some red onion...

I hate myself for liking it... but man was it good.

No pictures will be shown for the good of society.

Dan


"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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