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Dinner! 2012


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and gobbled up how?

It is the black stuff on the scallop dish. With the parsley root and the scallop, it was just a simple, clean and beautiful marriage of three flavors.

mm84321 beautiful dish ... I was wondering if you would give some info on how you made the walnut jus?

Thanks. The first step is to make a veal jus. For this, I use the meat from veal breasts, which are rather inexpensive, browned in quite a bit of butter, then I add three chopped shallots and two crushed garlic cloves, sweat, and deglaze three times with a combination of chicken and a very light beef stock (here I used the broth from a pot au feu I made last week). After reducing and deglazing, I add enough stock to cover all the meat, transfer it to a saucepan and simmer for at least 45 minutes while skimming off the fat. The fat can be clarified and added back in, but in this case the jus is strained, reduced and broken with equal part walnut oil (I use Saveurs de Lapalisse nut oils because they are the best that I have tasted). It's a great sauce. The hint of nuttiness with the sweetbreads is really delicious.

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mm8 - how many hours did those dishes take to prepare?

needless to say, it looks great; sweetbreads make me happy.

Thank you. Total active time, including shucking the scallops, was around 3 hours or so. Both dishes are fairly uncomplicated, each with only 3 or 4 elements, which has become my preferred cooking style.

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12 hour snake river farms wagyu coulette, cream spinach and veal demi.

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So, I have a question: when you cook at people's homes, what is your usual method for keeping plates warm? Last time I just used the her oven, which worked alright, but for one course I had to stack 2 sets of five dinner plates, and they did not warm evenly, so I had some which were warm, some which were tepid, and some which were still cold. So, I had to put some back in while I plated on the warm ones. Anyway, I am cooking for 12 next month, and one dish I am preparing requires the oven for cooking, so I will not be able to utilize the oven for this purpose. Any tips?

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So, I have a question

I only rely on the oven for warming plates @175, but in the one occasion I had to use it to cook something.

I threw the plates in shortened stacks, heated them up, wrapped loosly in foil and dropped them in the cooler I bring with me. It keeps them warm until I need them.

Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

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So, I have a question: when you cook at people's homes, what is your usual method for keeping plates warm? Last time I just used the her oven, which worked alright, but for one course I had to stack 2 sets of five dinner plates, and they did not warm evenly, so I had some which were warm, some which were tepid, and some which were still cold. So, I had to put some back in while I plated on the warm ones. Anyway, I am cooking for 12 next month, and one dish I am preparing requires the oven for cooking, so I will not be able to utilize the oven for this purpose. Any tips?

You can also warm plates in the microwave. Just wet them and shake so there's a film of water, zap for a minute or two, then wipe off if there's any excess water.

PS: I am a guy.

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Steamed Japanese Sea Bass (Lateolabrax japonicus) or Suzuki. In Chinese, 海鲈 (sea perch.)

Japanese%20sea%20bass.jpg

Mr Fish - all 570g of hm (before gutting)

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Mr Fish gutted, descaled, rubbed with salt and stuffed with black garlic and ginger in the cavity and in the slits cut in the flesh. Sprinkled with chilli. Almost ready for the steamer. Will be dribbled with a little shaoxing wine and soy sauce.

spinach.jpg

Spinach cleaned and ready for wilting / stir frying

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Steamed fish garnished with Chinese chives and coriander leaf, ready to eat.

dinner1.jpg

Dinner (fish, rice and spinach.)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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So, I have a question: when you cook at people's homes, what is your usual method for keeping plates warm? Last time I just used the her oven, which worked alright, but for one course I had to stack 2 sets of five dinner plates, and they did not warm evenly, so I had some which were warm, some which were tepid, and some which were still cold. So, I had to put some back in while I plated on the warm ones. Anyway, I am cooking for 12 next month, and one dish I am preparing requires the oven for cooking, so I will not be able to utilize the oven for this purpose. Any tips?

You can also warm plates in the microwave. Just wet them and shake so there's a film of water, zap for a minute or two, then wipe off if there's any excess water.

I also fill my sink with hot water and sit the plates in it. Take them out, dry them, and plate. Like in sous vide cooking, the water is a fast transmitter of heat so this takes minimal time.

Edited by nickrey (log)

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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'Paul Bacino Custom Blend 1.' This is at a new level. Knockout !. It has me smiling, and hungry.

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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liuzhou, what a lovely steamed bass dinner! Very nice.

It's actually quite amazing and an interesting coincidence, because I also had a steamed bass dinner last night.

I used what is sold here in the Chinese groceries as "big mouth bass" and did it a quasi-Cantonese way. The gutted, descaled, washed fish (swimming around in the tank just a few hours prior to dinner before it got fished out and bashed on the head :smile: ) was marinated a short while w/ Shaohsing wine, sesame oil, white pepper, chopped green onions/scallions, julienned ginger, a bit of soy sauce plus a dash of salt (with the cavity stuffed w/ the scallions & ginger too) then steamed in the usual manner. The fish only is then retrieved from the steaming dish and plated on another dish (that serving dish in the pic), julienned ginger & scallions (lots!) and chopped cilantro strewn over it and a sauce of [a little garlic & julienned ginger briefly sautéed in hot vegetable oil, quenched w/ soy sauce (Pearl River light soy sauce & Higeta Honzen soy sauce)] poured over the whole shebang. I normally up the amount of scallions/cilantro/ginger (& some garlic) than you might find in a restaurant as I like lots of the stuff.

The veggie accompaniment was a variation of "Yau Mak Choy" a.k.a. romaine lettuce, blanched in oiled hot water, drained, drizzled w/ oyster sauce.

White steamed rice.

DSCN7310b_1k.jpg

Edited by huiray (log)
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