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Latkes - the Topic!


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For those who use the recovered potato starch as a binder -- do you use ALL the starch???  It seems like a lot.  

 

If I had grown up with these, I'm sure I'd know the correct texture when I saw it.  But I'm travelling here.    

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1 hour ago, SLB said:

For those who use the recovered potato starch as a binder -- do you use ALL the starch???  It seems like a lot.  

Yes.  It depends on what kind of potato you use though.  I've been using Yukon Gold lately and there isn't much starch in the bowl, so  I add flour (or potato starch if they need to be gluten free).

 

But just mix the starch back in with the eggs and seasonings. 

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1 hour ago, SLB said:

For those who use the recovered potato starch as a binder -- do you use ALL the starch???  It seems like a lot.  

 

If I had grown up with these, I'm sure I'd know the correct texture when I saw it.  But I'm travelling here.    

 

Yes, it is hard to have too much starch. I'd be more worried about not straining enough liquid and by that introducing unwanted moisture.

That said, I stopped doing that and now simply add dried potato starch. It's easier.

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~ Shai N.

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4 hours ago, SLB said:

For those who use the recovered potato starch as a binder -- do you use ALL the starch???  It seems like a lot.  

 

If I had grown up with these, I'm sure I'd know the correct texture when I saw it.  But I'm travelling here.    

If using only russets, and it seemed like there was a lot of potato starch, I might add half of it back in. If using half russets and half yukons I probably would all of it back in.

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  • 2 weeks later...
1 hour ago, scubadoo97 said:

Had my son, his Gf and my BIL over for a Hanukkah  dinner
 

Latkes  were on the menu

9942B5E1-ACED-4476-AF95-4E1C6DB8B781.jpeg

These look practically like my grandmother's - though she probably didn't have any nonstick.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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11 hours ago, weinoo said:

These look practically like my grandmother's - though she probably didn't have any nonstick.


Same visuals in my memory. My grandma used a blue enameled frying pan with a cracked wooden handle. Definitely not designed nonstick, but as her potato pancakes were exclusively fried swimming in lard and that specific pan was only used for frying potato pancakes I assume that ~40 years plus of usage left the surface as nonstick as any perfluorated polymer 😉

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On 12/25/2020 at 3:58 PM, scubadoo97 said:

Had my son, his Gf and my BIL over for a Hanukkah  dinner
 

Latkes  were on the menu

9942B5E1-ACED-4476-AF95-4E1C6DB8B781.jpeg

These look somehow thicker than the shredded potatoes only ones I've seen and made.  Was there some other form of potatoes used?  And do you share the recipe?

 

Jessica made some really delicious, but non-traditional latkes for Xmas Eve.  It is hard to see in the picture, but they are made from sweet potatoes.  After frying, they are topped with wedges of Brie and broiled to melt it.  They are then topped with dressed arugula:

IMG_4452.jpg.51fe8c915ef8d6b417075e2be70d40d9.jpg

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I don't use egg, flour, or any of those nasty binders. My 90 yr old polish grandmother taught me to use shredded/grated potato, and as a binder.........mashed potatoes. You're welcome.

 

Are you making pancakes, or potato cakes? There should be nothing but potato, onion milk, butter, and herbs and seasonings.

Edited by FeChef (log)
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23 hours ago, FeChef said:

I don't use egg, flour, or any of those nasty binders. My 90 yr old polish grandmother taught me to use shredded/grated potato, and as a binder.........mashed potatoes. You're welcome.

 

Are you making pancakes, or potato cakes? There should be nothing but potato, onion milk, butter, and herbs and seasonings.

Is that a Jewish latke? My Jewish-Polish baba (who would be 120 now) made them just like I do - shredded potato, onion, salt, pepper, egg and maybe some extra starch. 

 

She would most likely have made a garlicky brisket to go with them for a holiday meal, and since she was orthodox would never have served with any dairy products. 

 

Now, I'd say they were both latkes, because latkes really are just a pancake and I've made many varieties over the years (sweet potato, zucchini/ leek,  beet/ chevre,  corn, cauliflower, etc) but the potato/ onion/ egg mix is probably the most common traditional mix. 

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3 minutes ago, Pam R said:

Is that a Jewish latke? My Jewish-Polish baba (who would be 120 now) made them just like I do - shredded potato, onion, salt, pepper, egg and maybe some extra starch. 

 

She would most likely have made a garlicky brisket to go with them for a holiday meal, and since she was orthodox would never have served with any dairy products. 

 

Now, I'd say they were both latkes, because latkes really are just a pancake and I've made many varieties over the years (sweet potato, zucchini/ leek,  beet/ chevre,  corn, cauliflower, etc) but the potato/ onion/ egg mix is probably the most common traditional mix. 

 

She (your baba) may have known my Jewish-Austrian baba, who would be approximately the same age + 10?, and made them (the latkes) the same way you do (and I sometimes do). Extra starch would've come from the potatoes themselves (you know, the stuff in the bottom of the bowl) or matzo meal. The garlicky brisket and, it's the emmes, the overcooked turkey, would've accompanied.

 

You can have your dairy tomorrow.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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7 minutes ago, Pam R said:

Is that a Jewish latke? My Jewish-Polish baba (who would be 120 now) made them just like I do - shredded potato, onion, salt, pepper, egg and maybe some extra starch. 

 

She would most likely have made a garlicky brisket to go with them for a holiday meal, and since she was orthodox would never have served with any dairy products. 

 

Now, I'd say they were both latkes, because latkes really are just a pancake and I've made many varieties over the years (sweet potato, zucchini/ leek,  beet/ chevre,  corn, cauliflower, etc) but the potato/ onion/ egg mix is probably the most common traditional mix. 

No Its not Jewish. Its a Polish/Czech/Dutch variation. The ratio is more of a 2:1 shredded/grated potato to a high butter content mash potato. You almost need no frying fat. Like i said, the mash is the binder for the potato. The main ingredients are the potato, the onion, milk, butter, and herbs and seasonings to your region.

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11 hours ago, weinoo said:

What's onion milk?

 

11 hours ago, Duvel said:

Never milked an onion ?!

 

11 hours ago, weinoo said:

Not yet, but I'm willing to learn.

You guys crack me up. Its rare i see non serious posts on this forum, i love it.

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@Kim Shook  the potato was Yukon Gold and hand grated on an old box grater.  And the other ingredients were a small onion, egg, a little matzah meal, some starch from the potatoes and a little salt which was used to season and pull some water from the potatoes.    I used a big ricer to press out as much water from the shred that I could before mixing 

Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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  • 4 weeks later...

To my remembrance I have never attempted a latke nor any kind of potato pancake.  But I am excited.  I have ordered a shredder with a potato grating disc.  When does one use grated potato and when does one use shredded potato for a pancake?

 

Any other recipe suggestions?  Given, forgive me, that I have not read through this whole thread.

 

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