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Latkes - the Topic!


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2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

To my remembrance I have never attempted a latke nor any kind of potato pancake.  But I am excited.  I have ordered a shredder with a potato grating disc.  When does one use grated potato and when does one use shredded potato for a pancake?

 

Any other recipe suggestions?  Given, forgive me, that I have not read through this whole thread.

 

 

Grating it will give a more compact uniform texture and will release more starch, so it will also be more cohesive. Shredding will leave it a bit lighter IMO.

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14 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

To my remembrance I have never attempted a latke nor any kind of potato pancake.  But I am excited.  I have ordered a shredder with a potato grating disc.  When does one use grated potato and when does one use shredded potato for a pancake?

 

Any other recipe suggestions?  Given, forgive me, that I have not read through this whole thread.

 

 

I like about half a large grated onion to two large potatoes. Grate them together, dump into a colander, strain the hell out of 'em, add an egg, salt and black pepper, maybe a tbsp. of potato flour, and go.

 

Highly recommend with apple butter and sour cream. 

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Despite being raised in the Acadian heartland, and living most of my life here, I've only just learned that there's a latke-esque Acadian potato pancake. I don't know why I'm surprised at this, spuds are a longtime staple here and they're central to other Acadian dishes like rappie pie.

 

Here's a sample recipe, from a carefully-curated Acadian cookbook:

https://atlanticbookstoday.ca/thibault-feeds-the-palate-and-heart/

 

ETA: Forgot to mention it's called a "fring frang."

Edited by chromedome (log)
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On 1/23/2021 at 3:34 AM, shain said:

 

Grating it will give a more compact uniform texture and will release more starch, so it will also be more cohesive. Shredding will leave it a bit lighter IMO.

 

Sorta the difference between a "goyishe" latke and a more "jewishe" latke.

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16 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

Sorta the difference between a "goyishe" latke and a more "jewishe" latke.

 

Yes!

I was pondering the distinction the other day. Goyishe latkes are more hash brownish.

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51 minutes ago, kayb said:

I used to make latkes for breakfast with bacon and eggs, the latkes fried in the bacon fat. I called them Methodist latkes.

A shonda!! (Kidding!) 🤣

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I have a Swedish potato grater so I made a Swedish potato pancake by way of Magnus Nilsson.  Just grated potato fried in butter.  Overfried unfortunately, for which I can't blame Nilsson.

 

However I'm thinking I misused the tool.  The full English name is "Grating drum for potatoes for making potato dumplings".  But the instructions are in nine languages and the Italian is "Tamburo a grattugia per patate, per la preparazione di crocchette o gnocchi di patate".  This makes me think the grater is for grating cooked potatoes, not raw potatoes.

 

Next time I will try one of the other drums.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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  • 9 months later...

The truth about latkes, maybe.

 

Quote

The latke, it turns out, has its roots in an old Italian Jewish custom, documented as early as the 14th century. That, it seems, is where Jews first fried pancakes to celebrate Hannukah. Only back then, they were made of cheese.

 

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