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Breakfast 2021


liuzhou
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8 hours ago, Anna N said:

h if she did that in Oakville, Ontario instead of Vancouver, British Columbia……

Seriously I am impressed. It is a beautiful looking meal.

@Anna N, I've always grilled year around even the five years we lived in Sault Ste Marie, Ontario.

Just had to keep a path shoveled to the grill.

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Moe has a lot of favourite meals. I had a top sirloin Sterling Silver roast that I presalted yesterday and was intended for tonight's dinner.
I offered Moe a choice. Roast beef, mashed potatoes and Yorkshire pudding for dinner or roast beef, scrambled eggs and Yorkshire pudding for breakfast.
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He choose breakfast.
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I made mini Yorkshire puddings.
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Top Sirloin Roast two ways.
Yesterday morning I roasted a little Sterling Silver roast and served it rare.
Last night I put the left over roast in the Breville PC along with the leftover au jus .
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This morning Moe had a sandwich on homemade baguette, of melt in the mouth tender "pot roast".
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@liamsaunt@blue_dolphin is right, that is an absolutely perfect poached egg. 

 

@Ann_T – I’ve never had quail outside of a restaurant.  Your looks better than any I’ve ever seen.  And I believe that your roast beef and gravy and Yorkies would be my last request meal.

 

Speaking of cooking in weather, somewhere I have a picture of my dad, holding an umbrella and grilling in a blizzard.  The snow on his deck was at least 2 feet deep – well over any boots he had. 

 

Thursday – some of that good rye bread – toasted – a clementine, IP eggs (with a shameful ring of green), and Benton’s bacon:

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Friday:

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Eggs and rye bread, toasted

 

Yesterday Mr. Kim picked up breakfast at our favorite deli.  Sausage and egg biscuit:

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The best pancakes in town:

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@Kim Shook 

 

beyond excellent

 

kudos your way

 

I don't even remember what

 

" american breakfast ' sausage tastes like

 

I my try to grab some 

 

at speed 

 

the next tome I do a blitz

 

and , no ABS  is not ' best '

 

its ABS  

 

I be delighted to get some

 

British Bangers at the same time

 

but that won't happen

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Yesterday, I made this spiced eggy toast from Nigel Slater's Greenfeast: Autumn, Winter

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Each recipe in this book has a name composed of 3 of its ingredients.  This one is called Eggs, Spinach, Bread.

Served with tomato chutney. Just opened my second to last jar and tomato season is a long ways away. This is disturbing. 

 

Today, I'd planned on another recipe from that book but woke up with a carbonara itch...

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...now scratched!

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Another breakfast from Nigel Slater's Greenfeast: Autumn, Winter

76950814_IMG_3462(1).thumb.jpeg.9e97e56aa3e2c965cad0be3819c7cb5d.jpeg

The book's marginally informative names for these recipes are Parsley, Parmesan, Egg (on the left) and Pumpkin, Onions, Rosemary.

The first recipe is further described in the brief header note as: warm, soft, parsley-freckled drop scones.  I thought they looked like hockey pucks but they are light and fluffy inside:

IMG_3465.thumb.jpeg.17074940e9dee61678e3b29f9efd2341.jpeg

 

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10 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Another breakfast from Nigel Slater's Greenfeast: Autumn, Winter

76950814_IMG_3462(1).thumb.jpeg.9e97e56aa3e2c965cad0be3819c7cb5d.jpeg

The book's marginally informative names for these recipes are Parsley, Parmesan, Egg (on the left) and Pumpkin, Onions, Rosemary.

The first recipe is further described in the brief header note as: warm, soft, parsley-freckled drop scones.  I thought they looked like hockey pucks but they are light and fluffy inside:

IMG_3465.thumb.jpeg.17074940e9dee61678e3b29f9efd2341.jpeg

 

Scones have nice "crust" - I think I would up the greenery but that might affect the lightness. On the pumpkin - intrigued. If we call the hard winter squashes pumpkin generically - I love it but underutilize. Why I like how some countries, and here our Latin markets sell it in wedges so you don't have a huge beast grinning back at you. Was your pumpkin pr-cooked and then sauteed or? Since I like sweet and savory together it seems a nice partnership. 

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Red rice porridge with bananas, dates, pumpkin seeds and sesame seeds, both boldly toasted (it needs the almost smokey flavor you get), a touch of rose water and cinnamon - they amp each others floral notes, and less perfumey (a common combination is Moroccan sweets). With the dates and nuts it got some Moroccan charoset notes.

 

 

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~ Shai N.

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1 minute ago, heidih said:

Scones have nice "crust" - I think I would up the greenery but that might affect the lightness. On the pumpkin - intrigued. If we call the hard winter squashes pumpkin generically - I love it but underutilize. Why I like how some countries, and here our Latin markets sell it in wedges so you don't have a huge beast grinning back at you. Was your pumpkin pr-cooked and then sauteed or? Since I like sweet and savory together it seems a nice partnership. 

Yes, the savory scones were a nice contrast to the sweetness of the squash & onions!

It's possible that overcooking the drop scones is what yielded that crust.  Looking at them from the sides, they looked very pale and doughy so I gave them some extra time.  He gives options for using other, more flavorful herbs like thyme, rosemary, tarragon, or basil.  They were delightful right out of the pan but I'll have to see how they re-heat before making them again.

While "pumpkin" appears in the title, the recipe calls for either than or butternut squash and I used the latter.  The recipe instructs tossing the cubed squash and onions into a pan with butter and olive oil, cooking for ~ 10 min, then adding the rosemary, S&P and continuing to cook, covered for another 15 min or so.  Mine probably cooked a bit longer as I was waiting for those pesky drop scones to be ready.

 

@Kim Shook, that toast and jam look so lovely!   

 

@shain, those dates look beautifully plump and what a great combination of textures and flavors in that bowl! 

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536873073_RedCurrantSconeswithBrownbutterglazeJanuary11th20211.thumb.jpg.2107686dd92eac20cedc735c97005009.jpg

 

We started the morning off  at 3:00 AM  with cappuccinos and warm red currant scones with brown butter glaze

 

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 Moe requested hot chicken sandwiches and homemade fries for a late breakfast when I told him 

I still had the chicken breasts to cook that I  didn't cook last night.   

 

 

 

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I was in a rush to get some breakfast on the table this morning. I had made crepe batter yesterday and refrigerated it, but didn't get around to using it. So...

 

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The two rolled crepes are filled with scrambled eggs and ham. The folded one has some yuzu and Meyer lemon marmalade from June Taylor spread around.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Another from Nigel Slater's Greenfeast: Autumn, Winter, this recipe named Leeks, Caerphilly, Mustard.

IMG_3473.thumb.jpeg.847c78ce8e9043bbbe2c8833ba8bd867.jpeg

It's a leek, cheese & mustard cream sauce, spooned over toasted crumpets and broiled. I substituted sharp cheddar for the Caerphilly.

To go with, I cut up an apple and spiced pecans and tossed them with pickled carrot & daikon 

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1 hour ago, blue_dolphin said:

Another from Nigel Slater's Greenfeast: Autumn, Winter, this recipe named Leeks, Caerphilly, Mustard.

The man can do no wrong! Wait… I think I may pay his motgage for part of the year. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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13 minutes ago, Anna N said:

The man can do no wrong! Wait… I think I may pay his motgage for part of the year. 

 

I'm enjoying this one.  I think of it as a little book of ideas.  Two minor irritations, likely more the fault of a designer than the man who can do no wrong 🙃  The convention of naming recipes after 3 ingredients with no other descriptor makes recipe searching (via the index or Eat Your Books) awkward as you have to actually turn to each recipe to see what it is.  I was looking for egg dishes.  I had to turn pages back and forth to learn that Parsley, Parmesan, Eggs is a recipe for drop scones, Butternut, Feta, Eggs are fritters and Eggs, Spinach, Bread is a French toast riff.  The second annoyance applies only to the hard copy of the book - it's a tightly bound little chunk so the pages don't lie flat and because it's small, anything you use to weight down the pages is likely to block some of the text.  

 

 

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4 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

I'm enjoying this one.  I think of it as a little book of ideas.  Two minor irritations, likely more the fault of a designer than the man who can do no wrong 🙃 

I can appreciate your irritation especially with a book that will not stay open!

As to the three words to describe a recipe I think you have already discovered the upside! How you combine them is up to you and your creativity. And you are always amazingly creative. 
 

Edited by Anna N
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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7 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Crepe batter lasts for a number of days in the fridge.  

 

What's the over/under?

I don't want to have to start using it for blender ice cream!

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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2 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

What's the over/under?

I don't want to have to start using it for blender ice cream!

When our son asks this question, I tell him to look at and smell the questionable fridge resident.   It shouldn't have any off smell or appearance.    Me?   I've left crepe batter a week.

eGullet member #80.

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@Ann_T – as I’ve said before, I think that open faced hot chicken or beef sandwiches with gravy are my favorite thing in the world to eat.  Yours looks so extremely good that I’m thinking of making some gravy and getting a chicken at Costco (they do a better job than I can and cost less than a raw chicken in most stores)! 

 

@Margaret Pilgrim – I liked the look of @weinoo’s crepes, too.  You mentioned that you can hold the batter in the fridge for days.  Do you know if that is also true of English pancake batter (which is very similar)?  That would be really helpful, if so!

 

Back in June of last year, I posted a picture of some of @Sunny Simmons Steincamp's Breakfast Platter Muffins (which are basically crustless quiche).  @robirdstx mentioned that she made something similar and showed a picture of them.  I thought that hers looked much nicer than mine.  The only thing that we thought would have made the difference was the pan.  I used a regular metal muffin tin, and she used a silicone pan.  So, I put the pan on my wishlist.  Jessica gave it to me for Christmas and I tried it out on Monday:

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They turned out pretty well.  They were definitely more tender than the ones I’ve made in the metal pans.  They were a little odd looking due, I think, to the fact that I used red onions.  I also used bacon instead of sausage and the bacon ended up floating to the top of the “muffins”.  I think sausage distributed itself better.  I used half Gruyere and half Cheddar and that was good.  I also “built” them differently.  I always find that when you mix everything together for an egg casserole or quiche, things just don’t disburse evenly.  So, I put the cheese, bacon, onions in the bottom of each cup, grind in some pepper and then pour in the whisked eggs.  It works better for me.  I also want to try a little ricotta next time to see if that doesn’t make them more tender. 

 

Yesterday:

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Those damn eggs! 😠

 

Today:

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ET bagel w/ cream cheese, clementine, and those egg thingys.  I really hate how those red onions make these look.  I never buy them because, at least around here, they are so hot and sharp that I can barely cut them up.  I always hear TV cooks talk about how sweet they are and I wonder where they get theirs.  This little bag of them (from Jessica’s imperfect produce box) wasn’t too bad, though.  They just look wrong on the eggs.  Tasted good, though – steamed at 300F in the CSO to reheat. 

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