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Lunch 2019


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@rotuts Skhug [סחוג] is of Yemeni origin and very popular in Israel (I'll guess that it's the most common hot condiment, followed by harissa). It has many variations, all of them are quite potent and contain chili and oil. There are two main categories. The first is green skhug - made mostly of fresh green chilies, cilantro and garlic, often also khillbe (fenugreek paste). The other is red skhug - made with dried red chilies, garlic, dried spices (cumin, cardamom) and often some herbs such as cilantro and parsley and lemon.

Both are an important ingredient in the cuisine of Israelis of Yemeni descent, and traditionally served with almost any meal. Along with many items of this cuisine, they are very popular in Israel. I'll be happy to share recpies.

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~ Shai N.

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My lunch was takeaway.

Labaneh.

Tabbouleh, made with lots of mint and parsley, juicy bulgur, olive oil and lemon. I prefer it chopped finer, but the herbs and oil are of good quality and it's delicious nonetheless.

Fatayer flat bread. Laminated with olive oil and plenty of chopped fresh zaatar leaves and some other seasonal greens. It's quite rich with oil, but being griddle-baked on a saj (as opposed to fried) it is nicely charred and not greasy. Here being recrsipped in my largest (but not large enough pan).

 

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~ Shai N.

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4 hours ago, shain said:

@rotuts Skhug [סחוג] is of Yemeni origin and very popular in Israel (I'll guess that it's the most common hot condiment, followed by harissa). It has many variations, all of them are quite potent and contain chili and oil. There are two main categories. The first is green skhug - made mostly of fresh green chilies, cilantro and garlic, often also khillbe (fenugreek paste). The other is red skhug - made with dried red chilies, garlic, dried spices (cumin, cardamom) and often some herbs such as cilantro and parsley and lemon.

Both are an important ingredient in the cuisine of Israelis of Yemeni descent, and traditionally served with almost any meal. Along with many items of this cuisine, they are very popular in Israel. I'll be happy to share recpies.

 

Serious Eats (Kenji) just promoted it. I do trust their work:   https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/03/schug-zhug-srug-yemenite-israeli-hot-sauce-recipe.html

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6 hours ago, heidih said:

 

Serious Eats (Kenji) just promoted it. I do trust their work:   https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/03/schug-zhug-srug-yemenite-israeli-hot-sauce-recipe.html

 

That's a good recipe IMO. If going for the green version from fresh chilis, cardamom is not usually used. I'd also suggest to include at least some part jalapeño or a similar grassy chili. 

The red version can be made with dried red chilis as instructed, cardamom included.

 

I'll also give a mention for "filfel chuma", a less common but delicious spicy condiment. 

Edited by shain (log)

~ Shai N.

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On 3/7/2019 at 2:32 PM, Okanagancook said:

 

I tried my hand at rice rolls the other day for lunch.  It's quite easy.  Mix rice and tapioca flour.  Cook in a cake pan in a big steamer. I filled these with dried shrimp and topped with sweet soy sauce.

 

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Looks pretty good !

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Thank you @Duvel.  My stove is not totally level so the batter was thicker on one side.  Probably a coin or two under one side of the pan could fix this problem.  I really like them and will be a good addition to my Dim Sum repertoire.

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On ‎3‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 6:22 PM, Captain said:

We call them Bugs. Also known as Slipper Lobsters and yes a different taste, more delicate and often prefered than Lobster/Crays.

Ah yes.........I have had them as Balmain or Moreton Bay Bugs.  I am assuming they are the same?   Nothing still better than the enormous Mud Crab!!!  Miss Australia!

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1 hour ago, Owtahear said:

Ah yes.........I have had them as Balmain or Moreton Bay Bugs.  I am assuming they are the same?   Nothing still better than the enormous Mud Crab!!!  Miss Australia!

 

Oh what a memory. I had the bugs in Port Macquarie years ago and still can remember the taste. I'd never had that kind of seafood before. 

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Saw an individual duck leg at the store this morning.  Into the CSO at 375f for 25 min after a rub with soy sauce and sesame oil.

In my earnest attempt to empty a freezer, I retrieved some mandarin pancakes.  Assembly was with hoisin sauce and green onion shreds.  This was accompanied by a salad and a cup of gazpacho which was also from the freezer.  The soup is pretty good considering it is a raw soup.

 

Two more pancakes for tomorrow.😀

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On ‎3‎/‎20‎/‎2019 at 2:44 PM, suzilightning said:

WAIT.....where is the pear to go with that blue cheese?

I could not agree more, but the last pears I bought skipped right over being ripe!

HC

Edited by HungryChris (log)
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A small(3-4oz) piece of pollack fillet, soaked in a bit of milk, dried off then coated with panko bread crumbs that had been mixed  with herbs.  Baked in a 350F oven and eaten on a small toasted whole wheat bun with some tartar sauce and Mr. Ron's coleslaw.

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Pies from the bakery in Canungra on our way home from NSW....eaten on the tailgate.

One chicken and vegetables.

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One seafood mornay, we shared.

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I have berated my hand model for holding it upside down.

 

 

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Last night I did a hen stew (local name, tingul od kokoši)- I bought a 7lb hen on impulse, and had to portion it and wing up a recipe for a dish I never ate or have cooked. Even more foolishly, I left the house during the cooking for a few beers with friends, and a miscommunication resulted in the stew simmering for 7 instead of 3 hours. :$ I winged it even on wine selection, which was a touch too sweet- not surprisingly, tingul turned a bit too sweet too, so I touched it up with a glug of port, pinch of pepperoncino and a teaspoon or two of mustard and few grinds of pepper. 

The result was nevertheless finger-lickingly delicious. :D And 

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A cigarette is the perfect type of a perfect pleasure. It is exquisite, and it leaves one unsatisfied. What more can one want?  - Oscar Wilde

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Returned to Taketomi island for a festival in which almost all residents took part. Most lodgings were closed for 2 or 3 days. When I was here previously the streets were almost empty of residents (but absolutely full of day-trippers), today they were all outside watching traditional performances throughout the day. If you want to see a high concentration of healthy elderly Japanese just come to Okinawa.

 

Typical Okinawan food stands because restaurants were closed during the festival. Besides, there are about 3 restaurants on the island serving lunch only.

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I got a few things from the stand above. Sticky rice needed a chainsaw to cut through.

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Where I sat to eat my lunch on my last day in Okinawa and started planning my next holidays.

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Lunches at home:

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Tamari marinated trout roe on soft tofu (soba not shown).

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Edited by BonVivant (log)
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31 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

 

Sometimes you just have to have a wiener in a bun.

 

Well now you've done it excpt the onions seem to have done a runnner. Still hunting (in garage and light is burned out). No relish?

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Avocado, grapefruit, cukes, purple daikon, and pink peppercorn in balsamic and lemon oil.  Basically calling for seafood but I'm working on my base layers today.

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"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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