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liuzhou

Dinner 2019

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Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, gfweb said:

I am not one to talk anybody out of their Food dislikes.

 

i despise cilantro and no amount of reasoned argument will make it not taste like soap. 

 

But perhaps you never had fresh corn? Canned and frozen corn is vile. 

 

I've most definitely had fresh corn. I live in the middle of one of the largest corn producing areas in the world. If I look out my kitchen window in my second home in the countryside, all I can see is miles of corn. I should really move.

 

What I never see is frozen or canned corn (or anything else).

 

BTW, I love cilantro, but I call it coriander.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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Rancho Gordo Silvia (Flor de Junio) beans.  Dinner was supposed to have been beans and tacos but things happened and the tacos didn't.

 

Silvia are very good.

 

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Briefly home before the road trip continues South. Found a forgotten Pumpkin in the Larder. So a simple Spicy Soup for dinner. 

 

20190825_192431.thumb.jpg.3940df5b80e4fac621ecaca075e93b1c.jpg

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@Raamo

 

how long did you cook the halibut @ 113 F ?

 

i have yet to try low low temp fish.

 

looking foreword tho it.

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

I've most definitely had fresh corn. I live in the middle of one of the largest corn producing areas in the world. If I look out my kitchen window in my second home in the countryside, all I can see is miles of corn. I should really move.

 

What I never see is frozen or canned corn (or anything else).

 

BTW, I love cilantro, but I call it coriander.

 

 

But Which one do you love?  Cilantro are the leaves, Coriander are the seeds....you are allowed to love both (but we want to avoid a lovers quarrel!), but differentiators are significant!

 

 

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38 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Raamo

 

how long did you cook the halibut @ 113 F ?

 

i have yet to try low low temp fish.

 

looking foreword tho it.

 

 

 

I routinely (once a week) cook salmon in a similar way - I use a bath temp of 115F and cook to a core temp of 102 using sous vide dash to determine timing based on thickness.  It comes out just the way we like it every single time.

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Just now, TicTac said:

 

But Which one do you love?  Cilantro are the leaves, Coriander are the seeds....you are allowed to love both (but we want to avoid a lovers quarrel!), but differentiators are significant!

 

 

 

Only in that America. In the rest of the  English speaking world, they are both coriander. Leaf or seeds. I love both.

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43 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

I do love a spicy soup.

I love your honesty, sarcasm & linguistic skills so much I just spent 10 minutes consulting the Oxford and Cambridge Dictionaries trying to work out if I spelled spicy wrong 😂

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1 minute ago, TicTac said:

 

But Which one do you love?  Cilantro are the leaves, Coriander are the seeds....you are allowed to love both (but we want to avoid a lovers quarrel!), but differentiators are significant!

 

 

some cultures call both the leaves and the seeds "coriander"... sometimes it will be differentiated by saying coriander leaves/stems/roots, etc.

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1 minute ago, CantCookStillTry said:

I love your honesty, sarcasm & linguistic skills so much I just spent 10 minutes consulting the Oxford and Cambridge Dictionaries trying to work out if I spelled spicy wrong 😂

 

No!

Plain English.  I do love spicy soups

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Just now, liuzhou said:

 

Only in that America. In the rest of the  English speaking world, they are both coriander. Leaf or seeds. I love both.

 

Perhaps, as @KennethT eluded to, some cultures around the world do, but in the grand scheme of things, I believe you are mistaken.

 

At least, you can extend your statement to North America (much of the English speaking world), as technically there are 2 separate entities.  Perhaps in England they and other English EU speaking parts they bunch them together.

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2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

some cultures call both the leaves and the seeds "coriander"... sometimes it will be differentiated by saying coriander leaves/stems/roots, etc.

 

 

Most.

Is there any herb that you give different names to the seeds and leaves? Genuine question. My sarcasm mode has been temporarily disabled after sending @CantCookStillTryon a wild goose chase.

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1 minute ago, TicTac said:

 

Perhaps, as @KennethT eluded to, some cultures around the world do, but in the grand scheme of things, I believe you are mistaken.

 

At least, you can extend your statement to North America (much of the English speaking world), as technically there are 2 separate entities.  Perhaps in England they and other English EU speaking parts they bunch them together.

 

 

Ah! You are assuming most English speakers around the world speak American English. Sorry, but that ain't  so. Not even nearly! There are  more English speakers in China than in the USA and the majority speak British English. It's what the national curriculum teaches . Take in India .... Russia.... I could go on, but we are off-topic.

 

I deliberately said America rather than the USA.

 

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7 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

 

Most.

Is there any herb that you give different names to the seeds and leaves? Genuine question. My sarcasm mode has been temporarily disabled after sending @CantCookStillTryon a wild goose chase.

I'm having trouble thinking of that many plants in general where the plant itself is used as well as its seeds... Fennel is the only one that comes to mind at the moment (but I'm still a bit foggy after waking up not too long ago)

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

@Raamo

 

how long did you cook the halibut @ 113 F ?

 

i have yet to try low low temp fish.

 

looking foreword tho it.

 

 

 

 

For me, halibut is undercooked at 113. Salmon is fine there, but halibut needs help with texture. I like 120 for halibut.

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DIY dinner

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Cheese goes with everything.

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1 hour ago, KennethT said:

I'm having trouble thinking of that many plants in general where the plant itself is used as well as its seeds... Fennel is the only one that comes to mind at the moment (but I'm still a bit foggy after waking up not too long ago)

 

Well just from my pantry onion seeds, celery seeds, lovage seeds. I'm sure there are more, but I'm at the other end of the day and sleepy.

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Wild salmon and eggplant/tomato stew.  Salmon was mostly cooked on the skin side to keep it from drying out.

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18 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

This phrase still surprises me after 2 or 3 readings. The sweet corn up here in northern Minnesota is just coming into its own, and much of it is being schlepped up from the middle and southern parts of the state. I keep thinking that those of you farther south in the USA would have sweet corn later in the season than this! Does it have to do with the particular variety you plant?

 

Down here, you'll see sweet corn with a short spring/summer season (a little late this year, but usually peaking around July 4). Then you'll see "late corn" planted in late July or early August, harvested in September. 

 

I don't remember if we planted different varieties for different seasons. Not a lot of people plant late corn any more.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

This phrase still surprises me after 2 or 3 readings. The sweet corn up here in northern Minnesota is just coming into its own, and much of it is being schlepped up from the middle and southern parts of the state. I keep thinking that those of you farther south in the USA would have sweet corn later in the season than this! Does it have to do with the particular variety you plant?

Well, I'm not totally sure.

 

 I've planted Silver Queen and Nirvana--Nirvana being my current favorite--and both are ready by the end of July.  July 27th of this year was when we picked our first huge load that I put up.  I suppose one could stagger planting so you would have some that are ready later, but when I'm planting, I'm planting.  I don't want to plant again lol.  Like @kayb said, you can plant a second crop.  I actually did that for the first time this year.  I have no idea if it will make in time before freeze.  I found some left over Silver Queen seeds and did about 5 rows.  Maybe the commercial sweet corn growers don't want to stagger either?  Don't want to pay again for herbicide/insecticide etc.?  Maybe they don't want to gamble on an early freeze?

 

edited to add:   Some summers here are so very hot that corn burns up.  Could be another reason?  August can be brutal.


Edited by Shelby (log)
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DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME!     Arrive in the country.    DH asks for something simple for dinner.    "Hamburger".    Some "different hamburger"   Channeling the old SF Hippo teriyaki burger, I found the "Becker burger" in Joy of Cooking.    Essentially, cook burger until slightly under desired doneness.    Anoint with soy and port with dash of hot sauce.    Off heat, cover for 5 minutes and serve over a slice of whole wheat toast.

 

Okay.   I can do that.     Side of dressed bean sprouts.

912462436_Screenshot2019-08-25at3_21_32PM.png.1e11db2aa99e316737358fd0e1b5ec33.png

 

I won't say that it was disgusting, but it came mighty close.     If this is the Becker family favorite burger, I'm happy to claim no relationship.

This concept might have legs with a Marchand de vin sauce poured over after cooking, or green peppercorn sauce or.... but not reduced soy/port.

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eGullet member #80.

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34 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME!     Arrive in the country.    DH asks for something simple for dinner.    "Hamburger".    Some "different hamburger"   Channeling the old SF Hippo teriyaki burger, I found the "Becker burger" in Joy of Cooking.    Essentially, cook burger until slightly under desired doneness.    Anoint with soy and port with dash of hot sauce.    Off heat, cover for 5 minutes and serve over a slice of whole wheat toast.

 

Okay.   I can do that.     Side of dressed bean sprouts.

912462436_Screenshot2019-08-25at3_21_32PM.png.1e11db2aa99e316737358fd0e1b5ec33.png

 

I won't say that it was disgusting, but it came mighty close.     If this is the Becker family favorite burger, I'm happy to claim no relationship.

This concept might have legs with a Marchand de vin sauce poured over after cooking, or green peppercorn sauce or.... but not reduced soy/port.

 

 

I know its heresy, but J of C has let me down many times. Even with their 'cockaigne" recipes.

 

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8 minutes ago, gfweb said:

 

 

I know its heresy, but J of C has let me down many times. Even with their 'cockaigne" recipes.

 

I'm so glad YOU said it.    I have very little faith in their recipes.    I thought it was just me.

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