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weinoo

The Out-of-Season Tomato - Not All That Bad Anymore

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More than occasionally, a local supermarket chain in the NY area, Fairway, offers Campari for $2.50 per container.  At other times it's $4.99

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Check this out...

 

5dmBPnq.jpg?1

 

Found at my local crappy grocery store (Fine Fare, for those who know/care), these tomatoes actually look, smell and taste very good, for having been purchased in mid-March.

 

Now, I don't know if I'll be able to find them again, and this was the first time I'd ever seen them, but quite a nice treat.

 

Together they weighed at least a pound, and they were $1.99.

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2 hours ago, weinoo said:

Check this out...

 

5dmBPnq.jpg?1

 

Found at my local crappy grocery store (Fine Fare, for those who know/care), these tomatoes actually look, smell and taste very good, for having been purchased in mid-March.

 

Now, I don't know if I'll be able to find them again, and this was the first time I'd ever seen them, but quite a nice treat.

 

Together they weighed at least a pound, and they were $1.99.

Are these branded?  I can't see from the photo...

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Posted (edited)

@weinoo  An actual scent!  Amazing. I generally get odd looks when I'm sniffing tomatoes and melons :) - do it anyway


Edited by heidih (log)

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@weinoo  Where are they grown?  Are they greenhouse tomatoes?

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14 minutes ago, FauxPas said:

I think they are Intergrow brand, grown in upstate NY in greenhouses, but maybe @weinoo can confirm. 

 

http://www.intergrowgreenhouses.com/how-we-grow/

 

 

Indeed, that looks like it.  The obvious question is, why don't they put the stores that sell their products on their website?

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10 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Indeed, that looks like it.  The obvious question is, why don't they put the stores that sell their products on their website?

 

I took a quick look at their Facebook page and saw mentions of Hannaford, Aldi and Whole Foods but had to read through a few posts to find that information. It is annoying when companies don't provide such basic info though, isn't it? I guess you could always call or email them, but they could be promoting their products better! 

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I just sent them an e-mail asking why they don't list stores that sell their products on their web site.

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It's possible that in some cases, they are selling to wholesalers rather than direct to stores so they may not have a complete list, though I'm sure more could be done. 

 

In another thread, @Smithy mentioned a Bimbo bakery product, Doraditas, and when I entered my zip code, the website was able to return a list of local stores that had received delivery of that particular product in the last 3 days.  I didn't really want one but I was impressed.

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one trick Ive learned over the years :

 

if the tomatoes have no blemishes ,

 

they can age and improve a bit in a brown paper grocery bag w a few apples in the bag.

 

you wont ever get an increase in aroma

 

but the flavor improves somewhat.

 

if they have blemishes , fungus can rake root in those area.

 

better than nothing ( sometimes ) in the winter in NE.

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On 3/16/2019 at 5:18 AM, weinoo said:

Check this out...

 

5dmBPnq.jpg?1

 

Found at my local crappy grocery store (Fine Fare, for those who know/care), these tomatoes actually look, smell and taste very good, for having been purchased in mid-March.

 

Now, I don't know if I'll be able to find them again, and this was the first time I'd ever seen them, but quite a nice treat.

 

Together they weighed at least a pound, and they were $1.99.

They look like heirloom tomatoes. My local grocery store will have a special case for their heirloom tomatoes (at a special high price, too! ;)).

They sell their usual generic every-tomato-looks-the-same kind, as well. But I prefer the heirloom or "ugly" tomatoes. Great find!

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17 minutes ago, Toliver said:

They look like heirloom tomatoes. My local grocery store will have a special case for their heirloom tomatoes (at a special high price, too! ;)).

They sell their usual generic every-tomato-looks-the-same kind, as well. But I prefer the heirloom or "ugly" tomatoes. Great find!

I would be very surprised if they were heirlooms.  The variety is beefsteak - but within that variety, there are many subtypes - some of which are heirloom, and some are hybrids...  It is very uncommon for heirlooms to be grown in  a greenhouse - the costs are too high, and most heirlooms have a lower yield, and are not as disease resistant.  Most greenhouse tomatoes are bred for the greenhouse - they are less susceptible to mold (due to the greenhouse's typically higher humidity), plus they are typically more tolerant of a high salt environment, which is needed for the hydroponics.

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51 minutes ago, KennethT said:

I would be very surprised if they were heirlooms.  The variety is beefsteak - but within that variety, there are many subtypes - some of which are heirloom, and some are hybrids...  It is very uncommon for heirlooms to be grown in  a greenhouse - the costs are too high, and most heirlooms have a lower yield, and are not as disease resistant.  Most greenhouse tomatoes are bred for the greenhouse - they are less susceptible to mold (due to the greenhouse's typically higher humidity), plus they are typically more tolerant of a high salt environment, which is needed for the hydroponics.

Well, I am judging a book by its proverbial cover. Those tomatoes do not look like any other tomato in my local grocery stores. All I see in my local grocery stores are smooth-skinned red round (tasteless) tomatoes. 

That picture shows tomatoes with "pleats" which are more akin to heirloom tomatoes or tomatoes I can buy at my local farmer's market. They certainly don't look like mass-produced tomatoes which is why I guessed what I did.

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I've never seen a Beefsteak tomato with that kind of shape, but who knows? I looked at tomatoes at the grocery today, and saw nothing that looked like this, sadly.

 

Y'all are killing me. The last time I wanted a ripe tomato this badly at this time of year, I was pregnant with my eldest (who will not eat tomatoes to this day, because I ate them three times a day after they finally came in season while I was pregnant with her). 

 

I tend toward Romas or cherry-grape tomatoes when I'm dying for out-of-season fresh tomato taste. Not as good as July, but it'll do in a pinch.

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1 hour ago, Toliver said:

Well, I am judging a book by its proverbial cover. Those tomatoes do not look like any other tomato in my local grocery stores. All I see in my local grocery stores are smooth-skinned red round (tasteless) tomatoes. 

That picture shows tomatoes with "pleats" which are more akin to heirloom tomatoes or tomatoes I can buy at my local farmer's market. They certainly don't look like mass-produced tomatoes which is why I guessed what I did.

I could certainly be wrong.... just because something may be uncommon, doesn't mean impossible!

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