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Marlene

Camping, Princess Style

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Those potatoes look good.  I'll have to try that, maybe with a few sprigs of fresh thyme thrown in.

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I have to think cooking potatoes that way would make a mess of the poor pot?  Wouldn't the CSO on super steam give a similar result?

 

 

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55 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I have to think cooking potatoes that way would make a mess of the poor pot?  Wouldn't the CSO on super steam give a similar result?

 

 

I've never had a problem with sticking or pan cleanup using this technique. This post shows the same dish (complete with carrots) done in enameled cast iron. Remember you just cook until the water has evaporated; if you go until the butter is browning you've probably gone too far.

 

Since I don't have a CSO I can't compare the results. I would expect the fat on the outside of the potatoes to make a difference, but perhaps if you oiled the potatoes and used the super steam function it would be similar. If you try it, let us know, eh?

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Seen in Kansas City: an advert for some restaurant. In two electronic billboard flashes, it said

"WE DON'T HAVE COOKS. THEY'RE FOODOLOGISTS."

and

"WE DON'T HAVE BARTENDERS. THEY'RE MIXOLOGISTS."

 

I'm not sure I see the point. Maybe someone can explain it to me?

 

'Crost the Wide Missouri:

 

20190429_115001.jpg

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Further to the potatoes: this post tells in more detail the technique and proportions. I'd forgotten that it's considered a braised potato dish, or was when I wrote about it back then.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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7 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Further to the potatoes: this post tells in more detail the technique and proportions. I'd forgotten that it's considered a braised potato dish, or was when I wrote about it back then.

 

Does this recipe have a name?

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14 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

Does this recipe have a name?

 

It does, but until I get home to look at the book the best I can do is the obvious "Baby Potatoes Braised in Butter with Carrots and Dill". My copy of the New York Times Cookbook actually predates the Internet 😲 and I don't see the same recipe online. I'll update this topic if I find out more information.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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22 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

It does, but until I get home to look at the book the best I can do is the obvious "Baby Potatoes Braised in Butter with Carrots and Dill". My copy of the New York Times Cookbook actually predates the Internet 😲 and I don't see the same recipe online. I'll update this topic if I find out more information.

In my 1990 edition, it's "Braised New Potatoes and Carrots with Dill."

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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18 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

It does, but until I get home to look at the book the best I can do is the obvious "Baby Potatoes Braised in Butter with Carrots and Dill". My copy of the New York Times Cookbook actually predates the Internet 😲 and I don't see the same recipe online. I'll update this topic if I find out more information.

 

I predate the internet, and my copy of The New York Times Cook Book (1961) is in my hand*.  The closest recipe I can find is New Potatoes with Dill Seed-Sour Cream Dressing (p395).  No butter nor carrots to be found in Claiborne's version.  And peering closely at said Smithy potatoes I see no sour cream.

 

 

*singular.  I am typing with the other.

 

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28 minutes ago, chromedome said:

In my 1990 edition, it's "Braised New Potatoes and Carrots with Dill."

 

20 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I predate the internet, and my copy of The New York Times Cook Book (1961) is in my hand*.  The closest recipe I can find is New Potatoes with Dill Seed-Sour Cream Dressing (p395).  No butter nor carrots to be found in Claiborne's version.  And peering closely at said Smithy potatoes I see no sour cream.

 

 

*singular.  I am typing with the other.

 

 

chromedome's title and edition sound right. Definitely no sour cream. Hmm, 1990 edition? That may be the same edition as mine...and not as old as I'd thought. Predates my access to the Internet, but perhaps not the Internet itself, after all.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Posted (edited)
On 4/25/2019 at 3:02 PM, Shelby said:

My step-daughter had a billy goat for a couple of years.  He was a pill....and he didn't smell too good, but she sure loved him!

 

Oh the smell. We had on a trail - Oreo (black with a big white band in his mid section). Had to hold breath riding past. Heaven forbid if the dog rubbed on the fence - Pungent does not quite capture it. The one up the street used to pin my sister against the stable wall when she was pet-sitting. She almost strangled him once to escape. Los Angeles has a strong bunch of goat speciialized restos and yes a spicy flavoring is most common. I like it.


Edited by heidih (log)
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Those 'taters look great. On the fish - orange roughy is so lean. I do not buy it. The flavors sound nice but more for a quick marinade and a very short time in the pan or under broiler. More than that - yes  too much. 

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Smithy said:

Seen in Kansas City: an advert for some restaurant. In two electronic billboard flashes, it said

"WE DON'T HAVE COOKS. THEY'RE FOODOLOGISTS."

and

"WE DON'T HAVE BARTENDERS. THEY'RE MIXOLOGISTS."

 

I'm not sure I see the point. Maybe someone can explain it to me?

 

'Crost the Wide Missouri:

 

I think MIXOLOGIST is the accepted term now for bars that craft cocktails rather than simply pour a beverage, The food term seems bit odd. 


Edited by heidih (log)
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36 minutes ago, heidih said:

I think MIXOLOGIST is the accepted term now for bars that craft cocktails rather than simply pour a beverage, The food term seems bit odd. 

 

 

Mixologist is not a new term.  @Splificator traces mixologist back to bars of the 1850's.

 

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Quote

mixologist U.S. slang.

(mɪkˈsɒlədʒɪst)

[f. mix n.2 or v. + -ologist.]

One who is skilled in the mixing of drinks; = mixer 1 b. Hence miˈxology.

 

1856 Knickerbocker XLVII. 615 Who ever heard of a man's‥calling the barkeeper a mixologist of tipicular fixins? 

                                                                                                       - Oxford English Dictionary

 

to be precise.

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17 hours ago, Smithy said:

Seen in Kansas City: an advert for some restaurant. In two electronic billboard flashes, it said

"WE DON'T HAVE COOKS. THEY'RE FOODOLOGISTS."

and

"WE DON'T HAVE BARTENDERS. THEY'RE MIXOLOGISTS."

 

I'm not sure I see the point. Maybe someone can explain it to me?

 

I would guess the point is an extra few $$ at the bottom of your cheque, when it comes.

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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We spent last night at the Lakeside Casino, formerly known as Terrible's (and still known that way in our GPS database) in Osceola, Iowa. This RV park keeps getting more expensive. When we first started coming, the fee was $20 but you got a $10 rebate to use at their restaurant or casino. When the place changed hands, the fee simply became $20 with no rebate. This time it was $25. Not bad for 50A electrical service, water and sewer, but rather pricey for straight electric service, which was all we needed. Still, it's an easy setup. Food and fuel are close by. The park pond wildlife is fun to watch.

 

20190430_110315.jpg

 

We missed a chance at a different kind of wildlife watching.  Look closely at this photo. See the yellow bus and trailer?

 

20190430_105752.jpg

 

The TV game show "Wheel of Fortune" had brought its mobile operation to Osceola. They had two days of auditions going, using a mini-version of the game. I considered going to see some of the fun - OK, I confess I considered going to audition - until I found out that the mini-shows were two hours long, the line was atrocious, and any applicants who were called back for follow-up auditions would have to come back to Osceola. Nah. The fantasy wasn't that strong. I enjoyed eavedropping at the restaurant that night, from some people who had gone. Sounded like it was more stress than fun, but that might have been sour grapes from folks who weren't picked.

 

I looked at the buffet offerings, but aside from an awesome dessert table and salad bar it didn't look as tempting as many buffets. I remember fried chicken, chicken fried steak, roast turkey with trimmings, Szechuan chicken, fried mushrooms, several kinds of potatoes, barbecued sausage, roast broccoli, good-looking green beans. In other words, there was plenty to eat at the buffet but nothing to justify the extra money compared to ordering from the menu.

 

20190429_194747.jpg

 

20190430_114338.jpg

 

I chose the Awesome Chicken Sandwich; he picked the BBQ Bacon Cheddar Burger. The waitress, a delightful and informative woman, was good enough to substitute the rosemary roasted potatoes from the buffet for one of the other sides, at my request. 

 

20190430_104855.jpg

 

He liked his burger, but thinks he's been spoiled by our homemade burgers in which we mix hot Italian sausage with ground beef; he finds most burgers on the bland side now. My chicken sandwich wasn't as good as I remembered from two years ago, and I think it was a bit dried out. Still, it was a handful - and plenty - and well-flavored - and more than I could eat. The leftovers are in the refrigerator.

 

20190430_105441-1.jpg

 

Two years ago at our last visit, we learned about a law that required a 20-minute space between drink orders: you couldn't order a beer or a glass of wine more frequently than every 20 minutes. They've done away with that rule now, but the bartender was so slammed that the delay worked out the same anyway!

 

This morning we picked up sandwiches at the local Subway and got more information about the Wheel of Fortune spectacle. Sunday had been a zoo. Subway had catered the event, and in addition many of the would-be contestants came directly to them. Their business tripled for the day. The gentleman describing the scene said he'd been called in on his day off to help. The lines were huge and the parking lots jammed. It was good for business, but he was glad it was over.

 

This morning's breakfast sandwich for me:

 

20190430_104428.jpg

 

Eggs, salami, turkey, bacon, cheese, tomatoes, spinach, a touch of onion and a few banana peppers. A touch of chipotle sauce. His was tamer: eggs, sausage and cheese...but he walked away without specifying that he wanted nothing more on it. I had them add tomatoes and lettuce, with a touch of mayo. He wasn't pleased. "I wanted something like an Egg McMuffin!" I'll know next time.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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8 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Eggs, salami, turkey, bacon, cheese, tomatoes, spinach, a touch of onion and a few banana peppers. 

 I have just finished a delicious lunch but yet I swear I could get my mouth around that sandwich.   Him doesn’t know what’s good for him.😂

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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We've outrun spring.

 

20190501_220411.jpg

 

We got home this morning at 10:30, and my darling whinged all the way. It's 32F outside as I type. Our road is a muddy, sloppy mess complete with frost heaves: the trailer actually broke through the road surface at one soft spot, but fortunately not to the axles. There's a touch of snow left in the yard, and a few downed trees will need to be cut and split.

 

Still. We're home! The fire is cozy. The emptying of the Princessmobile has begun. I am agog with all the room of our house refrigerator, and the kitchen counter space. We have a dishwasher! I am still reflexively thinking of which sink to use when I wash something, until I remember that it all goes to the same (septic) tank. The Princessmobile has multiple holding tanks, and washwater distribution can be important over the long haul.

 

We spent last night as we had the first night of the trip: in a Walmart parking lot. We bought a few things that we would need when we got home, but their deli offerings didn't appeal to us for dinner. We ate the leftover combination of Jezebel-sauce Chicken and Spinach Madeline.

 

20190428_082746.jpg

 

Tonight, after umpteen trips up and down the (3 flights of ) household stairs and starting to settle into the house, it was leftover split pea stew. Trust me, the original isn't photogenic and the leftovers look worse. But they're filling.

 

Since I have no interesting food with which to close this season's episode, I'll show you the cover of a book I spotted along the way. It wasn't for sale, but it was an entertaining read at the laundromat - and claims to be the origin of the term for what we do.

 

20190401_231638.jpg

 

Thanks for keeping us company.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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5 hours ago, Smithy said:

We've outrun spring.

 

20190501_220411.jpg

 

We got home this morning at 10:30, and my darling whinged all the way. It's 32F outside as I type. Our road is a muddy, sloppy mess complete with frost heaves: the trailer actually broke through the road surface at one soft spot, but fortunately not to the axles. There's a touch of snow left in the yard, and a few downed trees will need to be cut and split.

 

Still. We're home! The fire is cozy. The emptying of the Princessmobile has begun. I am agog with all the room of our house refrigerator, and the kitchen counter space. We have a dishwasher! I am still reflexively thinking of which sink to use when I wash something, until I remember that it all goes to the same (septic) tank. The Princessmobile has multiple holding tanks, and washwater distribution can be important over the long haul.

 

We spent last night as we had the first night of the trip: in a Walmart parking lot. We bought a few things that we would need when we got home, but their deli offerings didn't appeal to us for dinner. We ate the leftover combination of Jezebel-sauce Chicken and Spinach Madeline.

 

20190428_082746.jpg

 

Tonight, after umpteen trips up and down the (3 flights of ) household stairs and starting to settle into the house, it was leftover split pea stew. Trust me, the original isn't photogenic and the leftovers look worse. But they're filling.

 

Since I have no interesting food with which to close this season's episode, I'll show you the cover of a book I spotted along the way. It wasn't for sale, but it was an entertaining read at the laundromat - and claims to be the origin of the term for what we do.

 

20190401_231638.jpg

 

Thanks for keeping us company.

 

Thank you so much for sharing your journey. You travel to areas I've never experienced so it is a real treat for me. I always learn something new! Glad you are home safely, better weather ahead.

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much appreciated here

 

a little bit of everything !

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Same here.  I enjoyed your journey.

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*stretches legs and back*

 

Kinda feels good to get out of the camper for a bit ;) 

 

Really enjoyed the trip.  

 

I also am enjoying knowing you are HOME with your big counter space and your dishwasher and your dishes and your bed.

 

(((hugs)))

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Thank you for taking us along on your trip.  How many miles do you travel?

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