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HKDave

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  1. B.cereus won't grow in the fridge. It grows between about 4c and 50c (per US CDC), although most health departments say 4c-60c. It reproduces fastest around 28-37c, hence the need for reasonably rapid cooling after cooking. The main somewhat-common food pathogens that can grow in the fridge are listeria and yersinia, but both of those are killed by cooking or pasteurization. The problem with b. cereus is that it can survive cooking (and re-heating).
  2. There is no special safety issue with leaving rice in the fridge for a few days. The main safety issue with rice is that it may contain pathogic spores that can survive cooking, and which could then multiply if the cooked rice were to be held for several hours under 60c/140f, but still warm, like on a buffet. If you have a rice cooker with a "keep warm" function, it's holding the rice above this temperature for safety. The solution is to cool cooked rice reasonably quickly. Health Dept. guidelines here, where we eat a lot of rice, say that cooked rice should be cooled from 60c to 20c "as quickly as possible (within 2 hours)", and then to 4c (fridge temp.) in under 4 hours. Personally, I aim for 2 hours from cooked to fridge temperature throughout. Spreading it out on a tray greatly speeds cooling. Note that I'm talking about safety here, not esthetics.
  3. Cathy Erway's "The Food of Taiwan" is pretty good, and widely available. I'd also recommend Tsung-Yun Wan's "Home-style Taiwanese Cooking". Both have recipes for niu rou mian (beef noodle soup).
  4. This is pretty much correct. The variety is always piper negrum. "Tellicherry" are the 3 largest grades of Indian black pepper. They are: Tellicherry Garbled Special Extra Bold (TGSEB), 97-98% larger than 4.75mm diameter, no more than 0.5% "extraneous matter", no more than 11% moisture, Tellicherry Garbled Extra Bold, same other than 4.25mm+ Tellicherry Garbled , ditto, 4mm+ Malabar pepper comes from the same plants, but is made up of smaller and/or unsorted peppercorns. "Malabar Garbled Grade 1 (MG-1)" is roughly the same spec as Tellicherry for corns larger than 3.25mm. Lower Malabar grades have no minimum size specs and allow increasingly higher amounts of "extraneous matter". With (reasonably fresh; old corns are always garbage) black pepper, size matters. The reason Tellicherry commands a premium is that larger corns have a citrus/floral aroma and milder heat; smaller corns are hotter, but one-dimensional. The aromas in the larger corns are largely lost with cooking, and larger corns are a lot more expensive, so I use them for finishing, and cheaper/smaller corns for cooking. As an aside, the largest sizes don't work in all pepper grinders. I have seen (and, sadly, bought) pepper being sold as TGSEB that obviously wasn't, so if you're paying for Tellicherry, knowing which grade and having a trustworthy supplier is essential. I haven't found one here, so these days I'm using Tellicherry-sized, but ungraded, peppercorns from a small domestic supplier in Vietnam. They're at least as good.
  5. UK retail sausage meat is spiced. It's 70-90% fairly fatty pork, plus flour or starch as a binder, sometimes some onion, usually mildly seasoned with pepper, nutmeg and maybe a bit of sage. If you're subbing shoulder, I would add fat. Generic US pork shoulder is under 20% fat. UK sausage meat is probably 30-40% fat.
  6. We had a discussion about the various Larousse editions... was it almost a decade ago already?... here: Larousse Gastronomique 1938 (the first edition) As for the original question about the 'best' English edition, as I said back then: "There have been 3 'American' (=English language) editions: 1961, 1988 and 2001 [plus, since that post, a 4th English edition in 2009]. They're quite different; I don't know about 'better'. The book grew from 1000 to 1200 to 1350 pages over the 3 editions and certainly became more up to date. For one thing there's now more than a passing mention of 'foreign' (non-French) foods. But if you use it as a French culinary history reference book - which is what I think it's best at - the 1961 edition is the closest to a translation of the 1938 French original."
  7. Furi's advertising says "Engineered in Australia", but the knives are made in China. I've also used them and not loved them. ChrisZ, re your original question - G2 or GF33? - you answered it yourself in the first line of your post: "I have been intending to replace my 25+ year old Wusthof chefs knife with something newer and lighter." If you want lighter (and cheaper), choosing between those two, it's the G2. The GF33 is 50% thicker and a lot heavier.
  8. Assuming he's the Chris Wright I think he is, he's in Philly. Try United Refrigeration; they stock vacuum pump oil and have 2 locations near you: 606 Spring Garden and 4111 Whitaker http://www.refrigerants.com/locations2.aspx?cy=US If that doesn't work, here's a Thomasnet listing of vacuum pump oil suppliers in Eastern PA: http://www.thomasnet.com/eastern-pennsylvania/oils-vacuum-pump-54942404-1.html
  9. HKDave

    Fresh Spanish Chorizo

    +1. I think the OP has 2 unrelated issues; the mealiness and the lack of juiciness. The former is is most often caused by not keeping the mix cold, as TheTinCook and others suggest. There's some discussion of how this happens here: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/79813-sausages-cook-off-17/page-6 The latter is most likely just not enough fat. Whole commercial pork shoulder is (these days) often about 15% fat. You need at least double that to make a decent juicy sausage. And I agree with EnriqueB's recommendation to use a coarse grind for chorizo, or at least grind the fat coarse.The fat should be visible here. I sometimes add small cubes of fat (sharp knife, almost frozen fat) to my chorizo. For more colour, you can add some unsmoked mild paprika.
  10. HKDave

    White Pepper

    1- Thai and many Chinese dishes. White pepper is the default kind in Thailand and some other parts of Asia (and even Europe). And also in light-coloured western dishes where I don't want black flecks. 2 - Yes, frequently. 3 - Yes, I have a dedicated ginder for white. 4 - Yes, for western dishes I usually grind it very fine to avoid flecks (it's not really 100% white, so finer is better for hiding flecks) 5 - Both. Coarse grind and/or whole for Thai cooking, fine grind for western. 6 - Thai for white pepper. Black pepper from Vietnam or India. Some white pepper can be a bit funky as a result of the frementation used to get the skins off. I avoid those. It's good to find a source where you can smell before you buy... in my case, I'm often buying in markets in Asia, so that's not a problem.
  11. Don't worry about it if you're braising them. Just thaw and cook until tender.
  12. HKDave

    Capelin

    Capelin must be in season; my usual dim sum place has had them as a special the last couple of weeks. They give them a light coating of what I'd guess is cornstarch and deep fry them whole, bones, eggs and all, and plate with a sprinkle of minced quick-fried garlic and chili pepper. Very yummy.
  13. At the risk of sounding a bit geeky, the Victorinox knife you're talking about has kullens, not grantons. The former are indentations in the side of the blade that do not extend to the cutting edge, the latter are indentations that do extend to the cutting edge. Most knives billed as having a "granton edge" actually have kullens. Kullens don't affect sharpening. As far as cutting goes, I've used a lot of Victorinox both with and without kullens as my work knives, and I can't tell much difference. I wouldn't pay one cent extra for a knife with kullens vs one without, let's put it that way.
  14. HKDave

    Combi Ovens

    I've used the countertop Electrolux combi http://tools.professional.electrolux.com/Mirror/Doc/BR/BR_BR-9JDBO_1_34_1_1_9JDBOU.pdf for several years (about 10?) and am less than impressed. It's not very well built for something marketed and priced as a "professional" product, it doesn't steam well at lower temperatures, the oven has worse hot spot problems than some non-convection ovens (and that convection fan can't be turned off, annoying if you're doing things like souffles), the water tray holds enough for barely an hour's worth of steam, and the timer only allows the oven to run for 2 hours before it shuts it off, so it can't do prolonged low-and-slow cooking unattended. And it's not very big; usable interior space is about 22x30cm. On the plus side, it works well as a convection oven and holds temperature better than any other countertop oven I've used, even in the 50c-100c range, where most ovens just don't work. And it is quite portable, which combined with its ability to hold low temperatures, makes it useful for catering. And it takes standard 1/2 pans. For a while there was a very cheap identical-looking China-made knock-off of this available from a Hong Kong supplier, but it's gone. So if you want a cheap combi, especially one that doesn't require plumbing and wiring, your options are still limited - which is why I ended up with this in the first place. The pretty Miele and Gagganeau home units aren't bigger and are a lot more expensive (at least the last I looked) and proper commercial combis like Rationals are another order of magnitude more expensive.
  15. HKDave

    The Terrine Topic

    Indeed. That's a nice-looking terrine. In fact, pates and terrines are as traditional a use of sous vide as there is. The technique was originally developed for cooking foie pate by Chef Georges Pralus at Troisgros in the mid-1960s. Cooking terrines and the like remains one of its most useful applications. Baron Shapiro, your minimum temperatures are correct if one only takes the terrine to that temperature mometarily. But the temperatures Nick used are safe when the length of time the product is held at that internal temperature is factored in.
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