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Cabbage


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For me excess / leftover / on purpose purchased cabbage goes pretty much exclusively into Okonomiyaki. Like that my family can go through a small cabbage in one sitting (plus a few pieces for next days snack) ...

 

C5352408-3186-40FA-8246-D4597E825C45.jpeg.d3863a7012ce5a48c09c2d63a67322d6.jpeg

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I've been chucking it into French-Canadian-ish style baked beans, with a light drizzle of maple syrup. Cabbage gets soft & sweet. 

 

Also loads of okonomiyaki. Yesterday's dinner was tonkatsu with a side of finely shredded cabbage.

 

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9 minutes ago, Beebs said:

I've been chucking it into French-Canadian-ish style baked beans, with a light drizzle of maple syrup. Cabbage gets soft & sweet. 

 

Also loads of okonomiyaki. Yesterday's dinner was tonkatsu with a side of finely shredded cabbage.

 

 

What are French Canadian style baked beans? Sounds interesting with the cabbage and maple

I too like the finely shredded in places where iceberg might be used. Enough crisp without being chewy.

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44 minutes ago, Beebs said:

I've been chucking it into French-Canadian-ish style baked beans, with a light drizzle of maple syrup. Cabbage gets soft & sweet. 

 

Also loads of okonomiyaki. Yesterday's dinner was tonkatsu with a side of finely shredded cabbage.

 

Ed's Mother was French-Canadian...Metis actually.  Now she made French-Canadian style beans.  She was an amazing cook. 

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2 hours ago, heidih said:

 

What are French Canadian style baked beans? Sounds interesting with the cabbage and maple

I too like the finely shredded in places where iceberg might be used. Enough crisp without being chewy.

 

Basically white beans baked with fat pork/bacon and a load of maple syrup. 

 

Mine is just barely kissing French-Canadian - I'm being very, very liberal with the term! I don't like my beans too sweet, so it's a light drizzle of maple syrup, plus a spoonful of tomato paste for umami. Cabbage adds a lot of sweetness. It's even better with Taiwanese cabbage, if you can get your hands on it.

 

At home I just call it pandemic cabbage beans - inspired by avoiding grocery shopping. 

 

 

 

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Various slaws and stir fries are my most frequent uses for regular cabbage. I've never liked steamed cabbage much. I do like cabbage rolls, simmered in a tomato broth and filled with rice and dill, but I'm far too lazy these days. Lately I've been making a relatively mild quick Asian pickle that uses one med-large head of cabbage for a quart of product. Super easy, refreshing, takes only one night in the fridge and works equally well with Asian dishes or Mexican. I find one little de Arbol red chile is enough, and if it's a hot one it can be removed from the jar at any time.  Ingredients are:

 

2 pounds cabbage (900g, hand-pulled into large pieces)
2 carrots (about 6 ounces/170g, cut into bite-sized pieces)
¼ cup salt (plus ½ teaspoon salt, divided)
2 cups water
1 cup sugar
1 cup white vinegar (5% acidity)
3 cloves garlic (smashed)
2-3 fresh chili peppers (optional, to taste)

 


 

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5 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

. Lately I've been making a relatively mild quick Asian pickle that uses one med-large head of cabbage for a quart of product. Super easy, refreshing, takes only one night in the fridge and works equally well with Asian dishes or Mexican. I find one little de Arbol red chile is enough, and if it's a hot one it can be removed from the jar at any time.  Ingredients are:

 

2 pounds cabbage (900g, hand-pulled into large pieces)
 

That is quite interesting. I am having trouble with "hand pulled into large pieces". Can you elaborate. Large enough that you knife and fork it to eat? 

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On 3/12/2021 at 1:38 AM, Duvel said:

For me excess / leftover / on purpose purchased cabbage goes pretty much exclusively into Okonomiyaki. Like that my family can go through a small cabbage in one sitting (plus a few pieces for next days snack) ...

 

C5352408-3186-40FA-8246-D4597E825C45.jpeg.d3863a7012ce5a48c09c2d63a67322d6.jpeg

 

Duvel, can you provide a recipe for this scrumptious looking dish?

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42 minutes ago, heidih said:

That is quite interesting. I am having trouble with "hand pulled into large pieces". Can you elaborate. Large enough that you knife and fork it to eat? 

Smaller than you might think, maybe? Big enough to pick up one piece with chopsticks and put it in your mouth? Happy to provide the instructions if you like, but no help with that judgment.

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22 minutes ago, TdeV said:

 

Duvel, can you provide a recipe for this scrumptious looking dish?


Sure !

 

Prepare a batter of

 

90 g AP flour

10 g starch

1 egg

120 mL of strong dashi

 

mix with

 

350 g finely chopped cabbage 

(if this is your first one, start with a bit less cabbage, it’ll hold better together that way)

 

and let sit of some 20 min or so. You can add finely chopped onions or some chopped chives as well.

 

Preheat a pan, but some oil and drop a generous amount of the cabbage-batter mix in. I usually prepare a disc of about 20 cm, with 2.5 cm thickness. Add “whatever” (hence the name Okonomiyaki) you like on top and press a bit. Bacon, sweet corn kernels, shrimp  or nothing ...

 

Cover and cook for some minutes at medium heat. Flip carefully, but fast, and cook the other side as well. Disc should be browned on both sides and cabbage cooked but still “al dente”.

 

Dress with Okonomiyaki tare (a thick and sweet soy & Worcestershire-based sauce), drizzle with Kewpie (criss-cross is traditional) and top with Katsuobushi and nori flakes ...

 

Enjoy !

 

 

Edited by Duvel (log)
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5 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

Smaller than you might think, maybe? Big enough to pick up one piece with chopsticks and put it in your mouth? Happy to provide the instructions if you like, but no help with that judgment.

I was not judging just not visualizing well. I get it now. Thanks.

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Just now, heidih said:

I was not judging just not visualizing well. I get it now. Thanks.

In no way did I mean you were judging. I just meant that when faced with ambiguous instruction like those everyone has to make their own judgment based on common sense, or what works for them. "Pinch of salt?" "knob of butter?" "Handful of parsley?"My husband's idea of a handful of herbs can vary wildly any given day!

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Just now, Katie Meadow said:

In no way did I mean you were judging. I just meant that when faced with ambiguous instruction like those everyone has to make their own judgment based on common sense, or what works for them. "Pinch of salt?" "knob of butter?" "Handful of parsley?"My husband's idea of a handful of herbs can vary wildly any given day!

Oh that is my style - really - I understand now. I like Salvadoran curtido which omits sugar and is finely sliced. Versatile and simple. love the look of the giant crock at the pupusa stand at Farmers market.  https://www.food.com/recipe/curtido-de-repollo-el-salvadorean-cabbage-salad-207798

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Green cabbage cooked in the Instant Pot is a revelation to me.  Sliced in wedges and layered on top of each other, (I put a couple of whole medium carrots at the bottom as a trivet).  Salt, pepper, 1/2 cup water or broth, 4-6 minutes, Natural release.  The sweetest, tender cabbage side.  I usually put me IP outside when cooking cabbage, because, you know, cabbage fragrance.

Edited by lemniscate
spel (log)
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Just now, TdeV said:

@Duvel, is the "starch" cornstarch?


Whatever I have on hand. Sometimes cornstarch, sometimes potato starch. It “softens” the dough a bit (for a lack of a better description). The effect mimics a bit the addition of yam, which is not readily available here ...

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3 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

Various slaws and stir fries are my most frequent uses for regular cabbage. I've never liked steamed cabbage much. I do like cabbage rolls, simmered in a tomato broth and filled with rice and dill, but I'm far too lazy these days. Lately I've been making a relatively mild quick Asian pickle that uses one med-large head of cabbage for a quart of product. Super easy, refreshing, takes only one night in the fridge and works equally well with Asian dishes or Mexican. I find one little de Arbol red chile is enough, and if it's a hot one it can be removed from the jar at any time.  Ingredients are:

 

2 pounds cabbage (900g, hand-pulled into large pieces)
2 carrots (about 6 ounces/170g, cut into bite-sized pieces)
¼ cup salt (plus ½ teaspoon salt, divided)
2 cups water
1 cup sugar
1 cup white vinegar (5% acidity)
3 cloves garlic (smashed)
2-3 fresh chili peppers (optional, to taste)

 


 

 

I think that's close to the recipe I recently used for (while cutting the sugar back 1/2 to 2/3, and using good vinegar):

 

image.png.e7694dde45bf121d40c7645a56c2a9b6.png

 

Still a big fan of Marcella's smothered cabbage, as well as her next-day smothered cabbage and rice soup.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Oh, now I remember what I forgot...

 

IMG_3738.thumb.jpeg.ebff3def61f4443bd433b87de9d949de.jpeg

 

This thread got me thinking about the head of cabbage in the fridge. So, cole slaw was made. Hand shredded (with a knife). And lunch, too.

 

In the post above the cabbage is hand and knife torn.

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Husband has actually been requesting what we call cabbage noodles.   Apparently an Eastern European dish.   But I amp it up by braising slaw-sliced cabbage in butter/water, then adding cooked narrow egg noodles.   More butter if necessary (😀).      He will have seconds at dinner, then stand over the pan with his fork...

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I make that, sometimes. Usually with a scattering of caraway seeds added in while the cabbage braises.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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