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Elissa

Coleslaw

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I've never added mustard seeds to cole slaw but it sounds brilliant. 

 

Okay, a question, peripheral to cole slaw. My mother's favorite sandwich was this: rye bread, very thin sliced ham and turkey and a generous layer of cole slaw with Russian dressing. What is the origin of that sandwich?

 

If it helps, she grew up in Cincinnati in a household that, if not strictly kosher, didn't eat pork or shellfish. Then she moved to New York and became a devotee of that sandwich. (Not to mention Italian sausages and raw clams.)

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59 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

 

 

Okay, a question, peripheral to cole slaw. My mother's favorite sandwich was this: rye bread, very thin sliced ham and turkey and a generous layer of cole slaw with Russian dressing. What is the origin of that sandwich?

 

 

I don't know what it's called but I want one.

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1 hour ago, Katie Meadow said:

I've never added mustard seeds to cole slaw but it sounds brilliant. 

 

Okay, a question, peripheral to cole slaw. My mother's favorite sandwich was this: rye bread, very thin sliced ham and turkey and a generous layer of cole slaw with Russian dressing. What is the origin of that sandwich?

 

If it helps, she grew up in Cincinnati in a household that, if not strictly kosher, didn't eat pork or shellfish. Then she moved to New York and became a devotee of that sandwich. (Not to mention Italian sausages and raw clams.)

Well, if that sandwich were made with Corned Beef (common deli sandwich in this area), they would call it a Corned Beef Special (Turkey Special exists also, one of my fav's). So it was likely your family adapting the NY area deli concept to their preferred/available deli meat.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

 

You've obviously never tried cockroach fried rice in rural Thailand!

 

Although, I will admit to preferring raisins.

 

BTW, I know it was a typo, but I like "cockaroach". I might borrow it!

 

No typo. Some New Yorkers say cockaroach.  Perhaps derived from cucaracha.

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Or as the late Mrs. Hansen asked my late mother-in-law ...

"Why would they arrest Andres for having a cockaroach?"

 

use your imagination of what the cockaroach was really.....

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One dressing I've stumbled on for slaw is a za'atar ranch -- a classic buttermilk Ranch base, with a few tablespoons of good za'atar mixed in. It works particularly well on a slaw with a lot of scallions and some jalapeño for a bit of kick.

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18 hours ago, dtremit said:

One dressing I've stumbled on for slaw is a za'atar ranch -- a classic buttermilk Ranch base, with a few tablespoons of good za'atar mixed in. It works particularly well on a slaw with a lot of scallions and some jalapeño for a bit of kick.

 

That sounds *extremely* good.  

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For everyday meals I don't use a recipe and only make 2 servings at a time. I like a little crumbled blue cheese or Gorgonzola, a little buttermilk, a little mayo, shredded carrot and finely sliced cabbage. I've been meaning to try @kayb's jail slaw but haven't yet.

 

If I'm entertaining (which I rarely do anymore)  and have time for a lot of prep work I like this: 

Apple Cowboy Slaw adapted from http://www.cdkitchen.com Serves 8

105g mayonnaise

3 TB fruity vinegar

2 TB sugar

3 TB coarse-grain brown mustard

¾ tsp fine sea salt

½ tsp black pepper

6 cups coarsely shredded cabbage

2 small-to-medium tart red and/or green apples, cored and cut into matchsticks

140 g dill pickles, cut into matchsticks

130g green or red seedless grapes, quartered lengthwise

2TB minced red onion

In a large bowl, stir together the mayo, vinegar, sugar, mustard, salt, and pepper. Add the cabbage, apples, pickles, grapes, and onion. Stir to coat.

Cover and chill in the refrigerator for 2 to 6 hours before serving. Stir before serving.

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When I use raw onion in slaw I do a brunoise.  No big pieces.  My wife is not a raw onion fan yet onion is essential in some things.  I don’t always add onions in slaw but I like them and when younger I hated raw onions 

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My favorite dressing: Hellman's mayo, good sour cream, Maille Dijon mustard, apple cider vinegar, fresh lemon juice, a bit of sugar, a bit less of salt, and -- here's my novel contribution -- some jarred white horseradish.

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My mom's secret for her coleslaw (and for her potato salad) was to add celery seed. She would put a small amount (a teaspoon, maybe?) in the palm of her hand and rub her hands together over the mixing bowl of coleslaw or potato salad. She said this would "awaken" the flavor in the seeds. Then she would blend it in.

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– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

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14 hours ago, Toliver said:

My mom's secret for her coleslaw (and for her potato salad) was to add celery seed. She would put a small amount (a teaspoon, maybe?) in the palm of her hand and rub her hands together over the mixing bowl of coleslaw or potato salad. She said this would "awaken" the flavor in the seeds. Then she would blend it in.

 

Not that secret! Your mom's a genius!

 

Quote

 

All this talk meant I had to make some slaw last night.  Cabbage, one carrot, salted for 2 hours and squeezed. 

Apple cider vinegar, olive oil, a smidgen of mayo, celery seed, mustard seed, black pepper. Not bad.

 

 

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