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Dinner 2021


liuzhou
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7 hours ago, heidih said:

@TicTac One of my favorites alongside fried oregano blossoms. Are yours done neckid or a light coating. And my usual questions - do leave the innards in? I do- like the contrast and the flavor. 

OoOoh - fried oregano blossoms you say!?  I must try those, as I have many in full flower mode.  Thanks!

 

The stuffed ones I coat in a slurry of cornstarch/rice flour.  The ones sauteed with the queso fresco are nekkid.

 

All flowers remain unadulterated - as you said, nice contrast in texture and very sweet in flavor!

 

 

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22 hours ago, gfweb said:

Thigh cooked in CSO, diced, generous shake of sweet pimenton, splash jalapeño vinegar, salt, mayo and diced piquillo peppers. I let it sit for 30 min or so.

 

Thanks! I'll likely try that this weekend. I've done one with pimenton, chicken, avocado and fresh corn, all dressed with a little mayo, that ain't bad, too.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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Tonight was supposed to be grilled chicken breast and leftover vegetable stir fry.

 

Then the rains came so the chicken was done in the convection oven but the stir fry happened as planned.

 

We are going to Cape Cod for the weekend and there were too many veggie leftovers in the fridge.

 

The prepped stir fry:

 

PXL_20210729_215250891.thumb.jpg.2de00ceb58698f2c1f3465edb629d26a.jpg

 

The cooked stir fry seasoned with fine herbs.

 

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Plated with the roasted chicken breast:

 

PXL_20210729_223329299.thumb.jpg.405f25e967ea299cf7256b7b7e6ef6b1.jpg

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28 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Over orzo pasta.

You drive me crazy with this orzo. Can you actually buy that in China? My favorite pasta and I can't get it here. Maybe you ought to do a feature just on the noodles and pasta of China.

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Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

You drive me crazy with this orzo. Can you actually buy that in China? My favorite pasta and I can't get it here. Maybe you ought to do a feature just on the noodles and pasta of China.

 

Doing a feature on the noodle dishes of China would take me the rest of this life and most of the next! Every town has its own specialty. Or three.

The orzo pasta is not well-known here. I'm just lucky I have access to a food import store; unluckily it is expensive. I can also find it online. Anytime I show it on Chinese equivalents of Facebook etc., local friends say there is something wrong with my rice and then I have to explain.

The only Italian type of pasta everyone knows is spaghetti. In fact they call it 意大利面粉, which just means 'Italian pasta' like it's the only one!

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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18 minutes ago, mgaretz said:

Salmon, grilled on the PAG, served with avocado and potato wedges.  The wedges were done in the MW then the air fryer.  The salmon was glazed with a experimental concoction of miso, lime juice and a touch of sugar.  Not half bad.

 

salmon-potato.jpg.82ecb7679eb0b12329b14b194955ef7e.jpg

 

Miso and salmon always seem like a happy couple to me. Like your potato 2 step prep. Will have to let stepmom know. So no drizzle of balsamic on you avocado?

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15 minutes ago, heidih said:

Miso and salmon always seem like a happy couple to me. Like your potato 2 step prep. Will have to let stepmom know. So no drizzle of balsamic on you avocado?

 

5 minutes in the MW, whole potato.  Then slice into quarters, baste with olive oil, salt, then 20 minutes at 400F in the air fryer.  Nothing on the avocado but some salt.

Edited by mgaretz (log)
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On 7/20/2021 at 11:04 AM, Katie Meadow said:

Aww, life is short. Don't diss kohlrabi! Salted, paper thin slices of raw kohlrabi make a great cocktail go-with. I can see it as a wrapper for sushi, although I never would have thought of it. Pickled kohlrabi is excellent. It does need to be fresh and tender and juicy, and it isn't always like that. 

Growing up in Western Pa and the heavy Eastern European influence in food, I have eaten kohlrabi since I was a kid.  Now with my own veggie garden, I always grow a row.  

 

You can probably do more with them than I do....but slicing thin on a mandolin then salting and pepper is the way to go.    Letting it sit with the salt for maybe 20 minutes is best.   It is unbelievably good...crisp, but like a flavor of a cabbage heart only sweeter. 

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3 minutes ago, Owtahear said:

Growing up in Western Pa and the heavy Eastern European influence in food, I have eaten kohlrabi since I was a kid.  Now with my own veggie garden, I always grow a row.  

 

You can probably do more with them than I do....but slicing thin on a mandolin then salting and pepper is the way to go.    Letting it sit with the salt for maybe 20 minutes is best.   It is unbelievably good...crisp, but like a flavor of a cabbage heart only sweeter. 

No arguments here. Raw paper thin slices, salted, is my favorite way to eat it. Good as a desperation salad or with salted peanuts and a martini. I've always noticed a lot of kohlrabi in the veg markets in Chinatown. No idea how they like to cook it but I'm sure no mixed vegetable stir-fry would be any the worse for some julienned kohlrabi. My experience buying it in various Chinatowns however is that often it is pretty woody. I grew up eating it too. Until I realized they have lots of it in Germany as well as China I thought it was a Jewish thing and was once informed that the name meant "voice of the prophet" or the "Rabbi's song," but really it just means cabbage turnip! Loses a bit of romance that way, no?

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So we have lots of veggies, lets do a veggie stirfry!

 

Green Beans, Red Pepper, Radishes, Ginger + Sweet Asian Chile sauce and Soy Sauce.

 

Quick and easy over rice.  Sweet + Heat and savory too.

 

20210730_185255.thumb.jpg.461f9bb829379622d106128d176b3c90.jpg

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Yesterday I made some of @Duvel's Leberkaese.

20210730_124836.thumb.jpg.87c593c167d569eb9254c5485615869b.jpg

It is wonderful. For dinner, I cut it in thick slices and fried it. I served it with potato pancakes, a rich pork gravy, Jessica's pineapple casserole, and a simple green salad. My Nicaraguan housemates loved it and they can't get enough of Jessica's casserole.

 I almost forgot. We had @shain's Basque cheesecake for dessert.

Edited by Tropicalsenior
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It's been 38℃ most of the day.  20:35 now and still 35℃. Not much cooking going on.

Rustled up this quickish.

Stir fried hand-pulled noodles, shrimp, garlic, ginger, scallions and what we call 'baby bok choy', but may well not be what you call 'baby bok choy'.

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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4 minutes ago, Duvel said:


Did you cry, too ..?! 😉

funny...a little bit. The sake was very good. For those reading along from the web  "The name of this sake translates to “Makes women cry” and for good reason as the complexity and drinkability of this sake is second to none."

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3 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

It looks beautiful and so juicy. What cut of meat did you use?

I used 2-  2" thick slices of boneless pork butt. Roughly each 1lb. We were 4 people eating. I only  sous vided this for 4 hours at 140F not 8 hours since my pieces were smaller than the recipe link

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