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Cooking Goose


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11 hours ago, rotuts said:

@Duvel 

 

some sausage might have been a fine addition

 

something ground very fine

 

w subtle favors 

 

I know !

 

the King and Queen   [ sic ]

 

of all  sausages :

 

Weisswurst :

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weisswurst

 

just saying

 

Point taken. Therefore we had Weisseurst the following day - my area produces a “Christmas sausage”, essentially a Weisswurst, heavy on the ginger and the lemon peel. Sold only one special day before Christmas. It comes in hog casings, so you can (very carefully) grill it. 

 

As every year, it was well received (with potato purée and sauerkraut, of course - German Christmas seems to be all about the spuds and cabbage derivatives) ...

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Certainly no goose expert, but I did one a while ago (the dearly beloved must have been out of town). I sous vide - confited the legs then coated in dukka and browned - trying to replicate the ones from a local restaurant - Masons of Bendigo. The problem was that the legs fell apart so I'd do them for less time. I roasted the rest because I didn't want the skin to get soggy in the sous vide. Still wasn't crispy enough but I'm glad I just roasted it rather than sv. That is if you want the skin.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I have started the prep on my Christmas goose. I am using Serious Eats recipe for Crisp-Skinned Roast Goose.

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The goose has been pricked and blanched, sprinkled with a mixture of kosher salt and baking powder, and is now resting uncovered in the refrigerator.

 

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Ours is underway too. So far I’ve broken it down into legs, a crown and some carcass pieces. 
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The carcass has been roasted with some chicken wings, the neck and the gizzard: 

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The legs are now sitting atop the browned carcass, with some bay, thyme and salt. They are set to start cooking at 6am for about 2-2.5 hours at 120°C:

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The presents are all under the tree so I’m away to bed, hoping I’ve been good this year :) 

 

Edited by &roid (log)
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Christmas morning update:

 

To tie in with our turkey better I’ve split the cooking of the legs and the crown into two separate parts. The legs were cooked really nicely after 2.5 hours at 120°C convection. I’ve pulled them out, continued to simmer the stock a little longer then sieved and defatted it. The legs I’ve wrapped in foil and will come back to later. 
 

The crown went in at 10am (again on 120°C convection) and took 90 minutes to get up to temp. I was aiming for 54°C as per the Raymond blanc recipe but overshot slightly to 56.6°. The crown is resting now (while our turkey crown continues to cook) and will get a blast at 250°C just before we’re ready to eat. 
 

Merry Christmas everyone!
 

 

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Late update, as predicted the champagne and claret took over 😚

 

Turned out to be the best goose we’ve had. Cooking the dark meat and breast separately worked very well. 
 

It took another 20 minutes or so in a 250°C oven to crisp. Sauce was a Madeira and cassis reduction and got rave reviews. 
 

I’ll definitely be making this again next year. 
 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

For documentation purpose in this thread:

 

Goose legs, rubbed heavily with salt, pepper, garlic and thyme. Directly vacuumed and SV for 24h @71oC. Crisped under a hot broiler with fan assist.   A keeper ...

 

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  • 3 months later...

@Duvel or anyone

 

I'm so bored with this virus thing that thawing the goose in the freezer was interesting.

 

I was planning to SV the breasts as I do duck, 2-3 hours at 135F (57C)  followed by skin searing, but the goose cooking times on various sites vary widely; from 2 hours at 135 F (57C) to 24 hours at 150F (65C).

 

Is a farmed goose breast so tough that long cooks are needed?

 

Thoughts?

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I of course had an opinion , w no personally supported data :

 

the duck was farmed , and Im betting so was the goose.

 

Id stick to the same temp for the goose br.  but consider a sl longer SV time as its thicker .

 

I doubt these geese get to fly around much  , un like their Canadian Relatives .

 

they probably get to walk around as much as the farmed ducks .

Edited by rotuts (log)
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3 hours ago, gfweb said:

Is a farmed goose breast so tough that long cooks are needed?


Unlikely. It is slightly bigger than its duck counterpart, but should not require softening if it is a farmed goose. Wild goose, whose breasts actually get sone exercise, might differ ...

So, 3-4h at 57oC should give a perfect medium cooked appearance, a little less (say 54oC) medium rare. I‘d go with that. 
 

Good luck 🤗

 

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I have to say, after reading through this entire discussion, I am extremely disappointed that not one person came back with a picture of their finished bird and captioned it "my goose is cooked." :P

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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2 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

I have to say, after reading through this entire discussion, I am extremely disappointed that not one person came back with a picture of their finished bird and captioned it "my goose is cooked." :P


Eeehm ... please check 5 posts above:

 

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11 hours ago, Duvel said:

Eeehm ... please check 5 posts above:


With apologies for my apparent lack of reading skill, you'll have to lead me directly to the part where anybody said "my goose is cooked"... I'm still not seeing it. :D

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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  • 1 year later...

Anyone like and / or cook goose 'bits'?

 

My local vendors mostly do feet (webs), heart, wings, gizzards, intestines etc. All delicious. Of course liver (foie gras and non-gras). 

 

I often do liver and intestines; occasionally heart.

 

Braised goose liver fried rice is a favourite.

 

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Goose Feet

 

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Goose Hearts

 

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Goose Wings

 

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Goose Gizzard

 

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Goose Intestines

 

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Goose Foie Gras

 

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Goose Liver Fried Rice

 

 

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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  • 2 weeks later...
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