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Ankarsrum Mixer of Many Names


JoNorvelleWalker
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3 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

A thingy for making rolled oats, etc.

I am laughing at “thingy”. It is nice to know that someone who is usually so articulate can occasionally find themselves at a loss for an (appropriately descriptive) word. Happens to me far too often.  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

A thingy for making rolled oats, etc.

 

 

I have learned something new today. It is a successful day. Thanks.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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I have a "vintage" "Wheat KRINKLER"  that is hand-cranked.  I got it sometime in the '80s so I could make "flaked" or "krinkled"  barley, soft red wheat, buckwheat, and etc.  An ad for it appeared in Popular Mechanics in December 1932.

This was made in the 1930s but it was in very good condition when I found it at a farm auction in Bakersfield, CA.

873663259_grainflaker.JPG.fb8e5861491fe4137186f4f32e7039e0.JPG

 

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967100468_Grainflaker2.JPG.157003ef71ca50d1fcdb0d977b8b6db7.JPG

 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Some of the grains or seeds that were hard, had to be steamed and dried first.  I can't find the instructions, but that was how they said to prepare hard winter wheat, "shoe peg" corn, buckwheat  and sorghum.  

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I searched but I could not find a thread for flockers/flakers/krinklers.  Perhaps one should be started?  How about flocklng/flaking/krinkling other grains besides oats?

 

In looking around the web, oat groats are expensive.  My local Shoprite carries Bob's Red Mill products but I could not find their oat groats on the shelf.  Bob's online store has oat groats at a reasonable price but there is a $59 minimum for free shipping.

 

Life is never easy.

 

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I searched but I could not find a thread for flockers/flakers/krinklers.  Perhaps one should be started?  How about flocklng/flaking/krinkling other grains besides oats?

 

In looking around the web, oat groats are expensive.  My local Shoprite carries Bob's Red Mill products but I could not find their oat groats on the shelf.  Bob's online store has oat groats at a reasonable price but there is a $59 minimum for free shipping.

 

Life is never easy.

 

 

We have Winco markets that carry MANY BULK GRAINS AND ETC.,  Before they opened, I used to go to a Co-Op in Mojave  after I moved up here.

Before that I shopped at a Co-Op store  in Sun Valley, CA in the Valley.

 

WinCo Foods, Inc. is a privately held, majority employee-owned American supermarket chain based in Boise, Idaho with retail stores in Arizona, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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6 hours ago, ElsieD said:

@andiesenji  I'm starting to think you  must have a museum or a display centre of some sort.  Just when I think you can't possible surprise me anymore, you do.  Thank you for sharing them.

I collected  odd kitchen stuff, vintage appliances & cookbooks for 40 years.  I have a large storage unit 15' x 40' stuffed full.  and two of my 4 bedrooms filled with boxes of books and metal shelving holding many of these things which I am selling, little by little on ebay. 

I can't do a lot of this work at once so the last couple of years just a little at a time.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
5 hours ago, catdaddy said:

Do the oats have to be cooked at all before flocking?

 

Nothing I've seen in the Ankarsrum literature or demonstration videos mentions cooking the groats before flocking.  In any event I did not cook my groats and I was quite pleased with the result.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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IIRC oat groats are routinely steamed in processing, to inactivate an enzyme that would otherwise cause their oils to quickly become rancid.

I doubt it especially matters in the context, though.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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On ‎2‎/‎21‎/‎2020 at 12:50 PM, chromedome said:

IIRC oat groats are routinely steamed in processing, to inactivate an enzyme that would otherwise cause their oils to quickly become rancid.

I doubt it especially matters in the context, though.

 

Today I read in the NY Times that steel cut oats are more healthful than rolled oats because rolled oats are precooked.  Who knew?  I was planning to flock some oats for oatmeal but I found* an old, half full box of Quaker rolled oats and used the Quaker oats instead.  They tasted rancid.  True, they were probably well past their best by date.

 

Then I baked some oatmeal cookies, but not with the Quaker oats.

 

 

*not really "found", I knew where it was all along.  That doesn't always help.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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  • 11 months later...
23 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

As I mentioned in the cheese grater thread, Ankarsrum attachments are currently hard to find.  Anyone on the fence should probably order now.

 

Might want to check the Canadian sources - looks like they might have stock.

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My Ankarsrum shredder/slicer attachment arrived, so of course I had to test it.  Amazon brought forth organic radishes and an English cucumber.  Obviously I could easily have sliced these by hand but I wanted to test the machine.  The slices were uniform and beautiful, unlike vegetable slices from the Cuisinart.  For once slices from an appliance actually looked like slices from a marketing brochure.

 

No fuss, no muss. Ankarsrum assures it is safe to stick one's hand in the shredder while it is running but I did not test this.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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Pleasant Hill Grain has been having shipping delays but my Ankarsrum attachment set was delivered yesterday.  I believe I now have all the Ankarsrum attachments save two, the burr mill and the pasta roller.

 

To test the grinder I made cranberry blood orange relish using the 6 mm disc.  I never had too much complaint with the KitchenAid grinder (except for disassembly) but the Ankarsrum grinder is a class apart.  The Ankarsrum is heavy cast aluminum, while the KitchenAid is plastic.  The Ankarsrum knife and discs are heavier by far.  The nut did not require a tool to remove.

 

The problem now is where to store the pieces.  A few might fit inside the chamber vacuum sealer.  At the moment the box is in the middle of my living room.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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