Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

JoNorvelleWalker

Ankarsrum Mixer of Many Names

Recommended Posts

Ankarsrum, the Swedish mixer of many names: Electrolux Assistent, DLX, Verona, Magic Mill...

 

Ankarsrum11172019.png

 

 

I understand a few eGullet folks have these, or have had.  Mine came this afternoon.  From what I've read, mixing procedure with the Ankarsrum is different from mixing with planetary stand mixers.  At the moment I need advice specifically with whether I should use the dough hook (with or without the scraper arm) or the roller attachment for my bread.

 

The Ankarsrum manual says to use the dough hook for dough with between 1 and 1.5 liters of liquid ingredients.  OK.  My usual dough recipe uses 410 g of water.  Rose Levy Beranbaum in The Bread Bible says to use the dough hook when mixing less than 4 pounds of dough.  Which if my math is correct is about 750 g of water (math is not my thing).  Beranbaum adds "For larger amounts, use the roller and scraper."

 

Yet most bread recipes in the Ankarsrum recipe booklet that call for the dough hook use about a liter of liquid.  The recipes that call for the roller use less liquid, 400-600 ml.  Beranbaum is usually right but I'm wondering if she's wrong?

 

Thoughts or suggestions?

 

 

P.S.  Sparkling Gold was not my first color choice.  Sparkling Gold was perhaps not my thirteenth color choice.  But Sparkling Gold was 10 percent off.  Besides, the gold color matches the gold lettering on the bowl and dials.  Now I feel better.

 

 


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker damn autocorrect (log)
  • Like 6
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No help, but dayum it’s pretty!! Still we don’t have a green with envy emoji :sad:


Edited by DesertTinker Correct wrong word. (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations on the new mixer!  
 

I recommend using the roller. Have yet to use the dough hook with my DLX and have been very happy with my results. Going to search for some of the tutorial videos that I found helpful... this mixer is not at all like most others.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had one for about 20 years - I originally got it after killing two Kitchenaids trying to make Peter Reinhart's  "Struan" bread from Crust & Crumb.

It is a very dense dough and the gears of the KAs  during those years were just not up to the task.  I had purchased the first one at Costco and since they have a  "no-fault" return policy  I took it back in and got a replacement.  When I returned with the second one two weeks later, they suggested I might get a "heavy-duty" mixer.  

So I ordered the AEG 2000 - which was that year's  name - from Pleasant Hill Grain as they included some extras for free that other vendors added on.

I used it quite a bit for large batches of dough as it could handle much more than the KAs.  I rarely used the dough hook but did find it useful for blending batches of ground fruits and nuts for pastry fillings and for "sugarplums"  and for fruitcakes  with stiffer doughs.

Probably 85% of the time I used the roller/scraper for bread doughs, cake batters, etc.  

The twin beaters in the aux bowl produced great volumes of egg whites and faster than the KA so you have to watch that they don't get too stiff.

 

The timer  was a  great feature because I usually had two or three tasks going at the same time..  I think all mixers should have timers.

  • Like 8

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have one of the older models, marketed as a Magic Mill ,  and I used the hook once, and then put it in the attic.   I use the roller for everything from whipping cream to kneading bread.  The roller can handle any volume of bread that will fit in the bowl, though you will need to turn the adjustment knob for larger loafs.   One tip is to manually push the roller into the center a few times at the outset of the kneading to make sure everything gets incorporated.  After that ,  it will knead dough all on its own, and I am sure you will love it. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, @curls, the videos were very helpful.  Particularly the one from Bread Beckers.  I had to laugh when a demonstrator in another video was using the Ankarsrum flocker to make steel cut oats!

 

Whether true or not, something interesting in another Ankarsrum video I found:  the presenter alleged attachments for KitchenAid, Ankarsrum, and Bosch were interchangeable.  He was demonstrating the Ankarsrum grain mill.  Of the Ankarsrum attachments, I'd be most interested in the nut grater and the flocker.  But they certainly don't come cheap.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Barrytm said:

I have one of the older models, marketed as a Magic Mill ,  and I used the hook once, and then put it in the attic.   I use the roller for everything from whipping cream to kneading bread.  The roller can handle any volume of bread that will fit in the bowl, though you will need to turn the adjustment knob for larger loafs.   One tip is to manually push the roller into the center a few times at the outset of the kneading to make sure everything gets incorporated.  After that ,  it will knead dough all on its own, and I am sure you will love it. 

 

Sadly I don't have an attic.  The dough hook will probably end up somewhere in the living room.  The living room is the overflow pantry storage from the bedroom.

 

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@JoNorvelleWalker so glad the videos helped. I saw your first loaves with the new mixer, they look different from your previous loaves. I hope you get the  Ankrasrum to produce the results you are looking for. Yeah, their attachments are pricey but when my Kitchen Aid meat grinder attachment goes, I think I'll buy the Ankrasrum attachment.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the hook for all doughs and the roller for everything else.  It seems to require less attention that way.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Cyberider said:

I use the hook for all doughs and the roller for everything else.  It seems to require less attention that way.

 

What weight of flour and water do you use?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I've learned about the Ankarsrum is it doesn't like liquid added after flour.  I had been using the Modernist Bread technique of adding a salt slurry after partial mixing.  Tonight I added powdered Diamond Kosher salt right after autolysis.  I mixed on low speed 8 minutes and 15 more minutes slightly faster.  Entertaining to watch the mixing action.

 

A minor problem is I can't seem to lock the arm.  Not sure if I don't have enough strength or if the unit is defective.  And while we're at it, the heavy bowl is a pain for me to clean.

 


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker spelling (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On November 22, 2019 at 1:21 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

What weight of flour and water do you use?

 

I don't weigh anything. I just use approximate quantities and adjust for the consistency I want.  Anyway, I find the hook less fussy for dough than the roller, no matter whether it's a stiff or a loose dough.  

 

The knob that locks the arm needs to be turned tightly to be effective.  The Ankarsrum is different from most anything else and takes awhile for the love to start.  One thing that is immediately apparent, though, is that it will easily handle twice the ingredients of a Kitchenaid without straining.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am so happy that when mixing wheat* dough in the Ankarsrum I can build dough strength that I just can't get from the KitchenAid.

 

But now I have another question:  I have not baked cookies in years and years.  Cookies are calling to me.  Would it be better to mix cookie dough in the Ankarsrum or in the KitchenAid?  Or does it depend on the specific recipe?  I have read one should not assay cold butter in the Ankarsrum, but cold butter is not at issue here.

 

 

*rye is a separate issue.  I don't like rye anyway.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Either mixer should have no problems mixing cookie dough. Go with whichever mixer you want to use when the cookie mood strikes. Now, if you triple your normal recipe, go with the Ankarsrum.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mixed my first cookie dough in the Ankarsrum.  The Ankarsrum did not mix as well as I would have liked.  The cookie recipe was KAF Crystal Diamonds.  The dough for Crystal Diamonds is flour, milk, lemon oil, yeast, and salt; then with butter beaten in in increments.

 

The dough merrily climbed the center column and crawled into the gears.  I suspect the end result will be OK, though with more mess and pain than I anticipated.  Another observation:  Stretch-tite plastic wrap sticks to the Ankarsrum plastic bowl.  Sticks as in "can't get it off".

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoops, guess I should have mentioned, I use the metal bowl and dough roller when I mix cookie dough. Haven't tried the plastic bowl & dual whisks for cookie dough (based on your results I'm even less inclined to try that combo). I hope the cookies are tasty!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, curls said:

Whoops, guess I should have mentioned, I use the metal bowl and dough roller when I mix cookie dough. Haven't tried the plastic bowl & dual whisks for cookie dough (based on your results I'm even less inclined to try that combo). I hope the cookies are tasty!

 

The dough recipe calls for only 177 g of flour and I was afraid that was too little for the big bowl.  Right now I'm trying to summon the energy to get up and roll out the cookies.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The dough recipe calls for only 177 g of flour and I was afraid that was too little for the big bowl.  Right now I'm trying to summon the energy to get up and roll out the cookies.

 

You can do it!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The dough recipe calls for only 177 g of flour and I was afraid that was too little for the big bowl.  Right now I'm trying to summon the energy to get up and roll out the cookies.

 

Agreed, that sounds like a super small batch for the big bowl. Ditto what @chefmd said, you can roll that cookie dough!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, chefmd said:

You can do it!

 

Thank you for the encouragement, Natasha.  I had one and only one project for today.  That was to get out of bed just after 3:00 and bake the cookies.  I had the Silpats and the stamina to roll out and bake half the dough.

 

CrystalDiamonds12102019

 

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Delicious 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By jedovaty
      (Note: This topic was split from the Monkey Bread topic, to keep both discussions focused and relevant to the question at hand.)
      I made inverse puff pastry last week for "chasson aux pommes" (apple turnovers).  Never made puff pastry before.  Beginner's luck, turned out beyond expectations, super layers, butter, crisp exterior, tender honeycomb inerior (even without yeast!!), lightly sweet, slightly tart, it took every bit of will power not to eat them before taking them to work. 
      Based on all the suggestions, I saved the scraps, and additionally separated them by size and shape.  Seems like I can make something called "monkey bread", but I have no clue what that actually is.  I've researched it, and it seems I should just bunch it up with sugar and bake... but these aren't yeasted, sooooo wouldn't bunching these up screw up the layers and make more of a pie dough squishy thing?
      Reading the forums, with puff pastry I can make little cookies or crackers or other things.  But I'm not quite sure how to do this?  They are kind of small to twist into sticks or roll into arlettes?  Help please and thank you??? 🤝
      For now, I've put scraps in the freezer.

    • By Pastrypastmidnight
      So I tried my hand at croissants for the first time in about 5 years. I used the recipe from the Bouchon Bakery cookbook. Despite the fact that I really struggled rolling them out (the dough was very stiff and resisted rolling), tore the dough layer in small patches quite a bit on the last turn, and probably took too long letting the butter get too warm, I got nice layers on the outside and on the interior and they did shatter nicely on the outside. I did not get that beautiful open honeycomb interior, however. 
       
      I’d love any tips or feedback or advice anyone could offer to do better next time—thanks!
       

    • By curls
      So, what is everyone doing for the pastry & baking side of Easter?
       
      I'm working on the following chocolates: fruit & nut eggs, hollow bunnies, Jelly Belly filled bunnies, coconut bunnies, dragons (filled with rice krispies & chocolate), peanut butter hedgehogs, and malted milk hens. Hoping to finish my dark chocolate production today and get started on all my milk chocolate items.
       
      My father-in-law will be baking the traditional family Easter bread a day or two before Easter. Its an enriched bread and he makes two versions -- one with raisins and one without (I prefer the one with raisins).
       

       
      And I was lucky enough to spot this couple in the sale moulds stock at last year's eGullet chocolate & confections workshop in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. These love bunnies help so very much with Easter chocolate production!  ;-)

    • By Rene_lorraine
      I'm a pastry cook working in NYC. We have a seasonal bread that we do with chickpeas, garlic (fresh and confit) and pecorino. We drain and rinse the chickpeas and it was working for a while but it hasn't been consistent. Bread turns out flat. What is it in chickpeas that kills the yeast and how can we counteract the effect? I'm taking a long shot by posting but wanted to further educate myself and fellow team members. Thanks so much. 
    • By Tara Middleton
      Alright so as of a few months ago, I decided to take an impromptu trip to Europe--mostly unplanned but with several priorities set in mind: find the best food and locate the most game-changing ice cream spots on the grounds of each city I sought out for. One of the greatest, most architecturally unique and divine cities I have visited thus far has gotta be Vienna, Austria. But what in the heck is there to eat over there?! (you might ask). 'Cause I sure as hell didn't know. So, I desperately reached out to a local Viennese friend of mine, who knows and understands my avid passion for all things edible, and she immediately shot back some must-have food dishes. Doing a bit of research beforehand, I knew I had to try the classic "Kasekreiner". Please forgive my German if I spelled that wrong. But no matter how you say it- say it with passion, because passion is just about all I felt when I ate it. Translated: it basically means cheese sausage. Honestly, what is there not to love about those two words. Even if that's not necessarily your go-to, do me a favor and give it a shot. Trust me, you won't regret it. A classic Austrian pork sausage with pockets of melty cheese, stuffed into a crisp French Baguette. No ketchup necessary (...and as an American, that's saying a lot). YUM. Best spot to try out this one-of-a-kind treat?! Bitzinger bei der Albertina – Würstelstand. Now here's a shot of me with my one true love in front of this classic Viennese green-domed building-- Karlskirche. Now, go check it.
       
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...