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kayb

Thanksgiving 2019

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We did ours yesterday, rather than today (which is, technically, the actual holiday). Pretty conventional, for the most part.

 

Final menu consisted of the bird and stuffing, 6 cups of gravy (plus stock left over for soup or whatever), mashed potatoes, rough-mashed carrot and turnip (actually rutabaga), a baked buttercup squash, sweet potatoes glazed with maple syrup, cabbage gratin, steamed broccoli and cauliflower, Brussels sprouts pan-seared with bacon and caramelized onions, and the green bean casserole (my GF's family spent a year or two in Long Island back in the late 80s/early 90s and acquired a taste for it there).

 

Desserts consisted of a board with a few cheeses, some dried fruit and candied pecans; an apple pie; and (by request) a pumpkin cheesecake. I did the cheesecake on a gingersnap crust (my GF hadn't had that before), then glazed it with a bit of Robertson's ginger marmalade and garnished it with more of the candied pecans.

 

The dried apples and apple pie both were made with apples we'd picked on our (third) annual trip to the U-Pick with the granddaughter, who is now 4, and I made a point of telling her so. She lit right up, as you'd imagine, and proceeded to demolish a considerable wedge of the pie and a large handful of the dried apples. I'm sure she ate more apples yesterday than she'd actually helped pick, but that's not the point. :)


Edited by chromedome (log)
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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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@kayb very cool about Food52 - Congratulations 😁

 

I can’t help but laugh at @Margaret Pilgrim 😂 Invited out! 

 

Our Thankgsgiving is very simple - these past few years I’m very extra thankful for that! We live in TX (all Native Texans!) and Mr Cat is a good ole country boy 😉 - so he likes a good ole country boy Thanksgiving - off times he’s not even here - he is down at the deer lease (which is okay with me - we don’t need a specific day to be thankful because the calendar says so - and we those times we always “celebrate” the weekend before) 

 

-Turkey or Ham (Mr Cat & Cat Son’s choice) 

-Sweet Potato Casserole (no marshmallow- pecan brown sugar crumble) 

- Honey Dinner Rolls

- Green Beans with Potatoes / Ham

- Mac n Cheese sometimes sometimes not

- Giblet Gravy if turkey

- Cranberry Sauce

- Corn Casserole

- Sage Stuffing (if turkey) 

- Pecan Pie for Cat Son (who swears he hates Pecan Pie, but he loves my Pecan Pie)

- Sweet Potato Pie - Pumpkin Pie - or Buttermilk Pound Cake- or Something - whipped cream 

 

And i always send something to the in-laws - some kind of bread - Cranberry Sauce and you know - something else ... some years it’s sweet potato casserole- some years it’s pecan pie - some years it’s Mac N Cheese n cheese - whatever ... they are also “good country people” - God love ‘em - and i do ... 

 

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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18 hours ago, CatIsHungry said:

Green Beans with Potatoes / Ham

 

 

My wife's favorite. 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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7 hours ago, chileheadmike said:

 

 

My wife's favorite. 

 

😁 Down here (good ‘ole country Texas boy territory) - I think it is mandatory table food every holiday and Sunday dinner 😁 ... Lots of things will be forgiven - but not leaving that off the table 😲

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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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In the opening post in this topic, I noted Food 52 had contacted me and planned to write about my family's cranberry salad in one of their pre-Thanksgiving stories. They have done so, here.

 

It really is good stuff. I encourage you to try it.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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1 hour ago, kayb said:

In the opening post in this topic, I noted Food 52 had contacted me and planned to write about my family's cranberry salad in one of their pre-Thanksgiving stories. They have done so, here.

 

It really is good stuff. I encourage you to try it.

 

 

That;s a great article! The salad is similar to one my husband's family does (the first time I ever thought cranberries could possibly be good) but they don't include the jello. I think yours sounds even better. I'll have to try it for the holidays, even though I don't have a sausage grinder handy.

 

Congratulations on being featured so!


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

That;s a great article! The salad is similar to one my husband's family does (the first time I ever thought cranberries could possibly be good) but they don't include the jello. I think yours sounds even better. I'll have to try it for the holidays, even though I don't have a sausage grinder handy.

 

Congratulations on being featured so!

 

I would note it doesn't really make a congealed salad; the Jello sort of makes a syrupy dressing.  While I still have the old sausage grinder, I have graduated to using the food processor.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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9 minutes ago, kayb said:

 

I would note it doesn't really make a congealed salad; the Jello sort of makes a syrupy dressing.  While I still have the old sausage grinder, I have graduated to using the food processor.

 

 

I have ready access to a food processor. Thank you.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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We're making Tg dinner the weekend before, to coordinate with Ms Alex's birthday. The timing for a fresh turkey from my favorite provider didn't work out, so it'll be a nice big chicken instead, roasted on a bundt pan. Here's the tentative menu: 

 

Smoked salmon on crackers

Hild Elbling Sekt NV (Germany)

 

Salad greens, crispy shiitakes, roasted chestnuts

Ginger vinaigrette

 

Cranberry-orange sorbet

 

 

Roast chicken, mushroom sauce (probably chanterelles)

Cornbread dressing

Roasted potatoes

Browned Brussels sprouts, dill

Chateau St Jean Belle Terre Vineyard Chardonnay 2012 (California)

Elk Cove Mount Richmond Pinot Noir 2012 (Oregon)

 

 

Pumpkin tart, tahini salted caramel base, macadamia-almond crust

Thickened and sweetened goat yogurt

 

 

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Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Great article @kayb - you gave  such a nice interview! Congratulations on having your recipe featured ! 👏🏻👏🏻😁


Edited by CatIsHungry misspelling (log)
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I have an EpiPen ... my friend gave it to me when he was dying ... it seemed very important to him that I have it ... 

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20 hours ago, kayb said:

In the opening post in this topic, I noted Food 52 had contacted me and planned to write about my family's cranberry salad in one of their pre-Thanksgiving stories. They have done so, here.

 

It really is good stuff. I encourage you to try it.

 

I loved the article.  It was too short, though.  That's just the kind of thing I love to read - family, food, memories.  Reminds me of things written by @racheld.  I miss her words here at eG.  Thank you for sharing yours!

 

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@kayb  Great storry. Espe.xicially the grinder. Ours was not as big but its postion as a holiday harbinger was the same.  Stepmother apparently pithed it - grrr

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On 10/12/2019 at 2:44 PM, kayb said:

I'm contemplating smoking my turkey this year; guess it will depend on how big the turkey is, as my little Masterbilt won't handle a big one. I might just buy an extra turkey breast and smoke that. Say, @rotuts, have you posted the procedure for smoking your turkey breasts in recipe gullet, or do I have to go hunt it down?

 

Not @rotuts, but here's Mr. Kim's method.  

 

I started The Gravy today.  Turkey necks, onion, celery, carrots, Bell's seasoning, salt, pepper, olive oil, and tomato paste ready to roast:

DSCN0356.JPG.64a7ecae78e3cbca91237a10a2331fd8.JPG

 

Roasted:

DSCN0358.JPG.a98530d192692e84880d7b9a50181f61.JPG

 

Lots of good fond brought up with some white wine:

DSCN0362.JPG.cc25148cb315ede670f4b6405495dff4.JPG

 

I made the stock in the IP instead of the slow cooker like I usually do.  It took 90 minutes of pressure cook and 15 minutes natural release, instead of all night.  Looks, smells, and tastes wonderful:

DSCN0363.JPG.5f3a66441e0907363430dde90c11ab81.JPG

 

DSCN0365.thumb.JPG.0ca16d89d3fd2eedca2a9c3f7619e281.JPG

It's all in the fridge now.  I'm hoping to make the actual gravy tomorrow.  

 

I'm not really sure when this will get used.  We often have our "holiday dinner" in January.  We will invite parents and various strays who aren't too tired of turkey.  My MIL has made it pretty clear that Jessica and I won't be contributing to Thanksgiving.  She told Jessica that "her family" likes very traditional food.  I admit this makes me feel weirdly left out.  And honestly pissed on my daughter's behalf.  Her cousins grew up being schooled in pie-making by this grandmother, so they will have their "traditional" sleep over at grandma's Thanksgiving Eve to make pies.  I know full well I should get over it after all this time.  I'll try again this year.  🤐😉

 

It actually might get used this Thanksgiving.  My MIL is probably going to have dinner at 5pm.  I will go to the nursing home at 2pm with a Thanksgiving dinner for my mom and me that will look for all the world like I made it.  😁  I have found a place that does a really nice Thanksgiving dinner plate with all of Momma's favorites.   A nice dollop of my gravy should help.😉

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It's amazing how much dissension there can be over holiday traditions. Food seems to be one of the most contentious, as in "These people put corn bread/oysters/sausage/kale/green chile in their stuffing!" We've all heard it before.  The point of sharing meals is sharing traditions that might not be what we're used to, in the hopes that someone else's favorite might taste pretty good to us if we give it a chance. Unfortunately it's the "give it a chance" part that turns out to be the problem. I think your compromise, taking Thanksgiving to your mom at the nursing home, will be very satisfying. Wish her a happy Thanksgiving from us.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

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Formerly "Nancy in CO"

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Cheers

Im having Computer issues

and i plan to update soon

re: smoked Turkey Breast

Ive done this w SV skinless and

bonelees

w the tendons removed

and after the SV bath

Ive chilled them

and smoked then cold on a Weber

as an enclosed space

with pellet frut wood. with a sleve

if you like

Im guessing

it you have a Weber

for heat , then add the the pelet

smoker for the compleat . skin on

on a Weber

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15 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

...I will go to the nursing home at 2pm with a Thanksgiving dinner for my mom....

 

I am really jealous of your cooling turkey stock.    I haven't begun yet.   

 

I hope you and your mom have a sweet meal celebrating a real "thanksgiving" for being together.     i actually prefer a communal dinner where disparate guests bring something meaningful from their past.    I will never forget the ravioli my Italian sister-in-law used to bring from her Genovese mother's kitchen to our Thanksgiving.   My father's New England side looked somewhat askance at them but I thought they were from heaven.

 

 


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eGullet member #80.

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I am still waiting to hear "the plan" as one friend usually is gifted a monster by a tenant and we potluck all the trimmings. I am collecting ideas. I kind if blew their precnceived notions last year with the olive oil orange cake - they thought it was cornbread from visual ;)

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@Margaret Pilgrim - thank you so much.  I hope Momma and I have a good time.  She has dementia, so you never know what you're going to get.  I was up there at 2am night before last because she was raising hell and threatening to leave and then yesterday she was so sociable and hilarious, we had a crowd around us visiting with her.  

 

The gravy is done:

DSCN0374.JPG.f52cb9522aacff8237e8aca8cee61763.JPG

It tastes great.  Every year when I start it, I get this fear that it somehow won't turn out that time.  It has never failed me yet!

 

It is always a little disheartening when you start with a gallon of liquid and you end up with less than half that amount of gravy.  😁

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@Kim Shook, I too am in awe of your gravy...and the timing of making it.  (I have a small idea of what a grab bag your visits can be. Here's hoping this is a good one. I'm sure the food will be delicious.) If I ever try making turkey gravy again -- I haven't cooked a turkey in years, and don't plan to this year -- I will look back at your tutorial and give it a try.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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5 hours ago, Smithy said:

@Kim Shook, I too am in awe of your gravy...and the timing of making it.  (I have a small idea of what a grab bag your visits can be. Here's hoping this is a good one. I'm sure the food will be delicious.) If I ever try making turkey gravy again -- I haven't cooked a turkey in years, and don't plan to this year -- I will look back at your tutorial and give it a try.

Honestly, we love this gravy so much that I'd still make it even if we didn't cook a whole turkey.  This gravy, some dressing, mashed potatoes and turkey cutlets and we have Thanksgiving any time.  

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The High Holy Day will be pot luck at my place again this year. 

 

I handle:

turkey (with extra legs and wings, dry-brined and then spatchcocked) - here's last year's alien baby:

IMG_1290.jpg.ab4311e482001a03d9e04d534bdc12c2.jpg

gravy (made stock from necks/backs last weekend, reduced so it will fit in the freezer for a few weeks)

IMG_2391.jpg.7bdc3fe60d5dabd5428ad65b7617b30a.jpg

dressing (bread, onion, celery, wild boar sausage, pecans, granny smith apple, herbs, butter and stock)

sour cherry pie

chocolate/caramel tart

a green veggie (since everyone else seems to always bring root veg)

pear cider

 

My friends are signed up to bring:

Cranberries Three Ways (one of which is Ocean Spray in a can -- woot!)

Dutch Potato Casserole (sort of a mashed/dressing combo - apparently very Western PA)

Brussels Sprouts with bacon

Barton's Kamikaze Casserole (a mix of 4 or 5 different roasted root veg, spicy and very very good)

Candied Sweet Potatoes - no marshmallows!

Rolls -- both the soft gooey white grocery store variety and also the fabulous bakery sourdough variety

Corn casserole

Mushrooms stuffed with crab/herbs/breadcrumbs

Mashed Potatoes

Frangiapane tart with fruit

a LOT of wine.

 

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44 minutes ago, PassionateAmateur said:

The High Holy Day will be pot luck at my place again this year. 

 

I handle:

turkey (with extra legs and wings, dry-brined and then spatchcocked) - here's last year's alien baby:

IMG_1290.jpg.ab4311e482001a03d9e04d534bdc12c2.jpg

gravy (made stock from necks/backs last weekend, reduced so it will fit in the freezer for a few weeks)

IMG_2391.jpg.7bdc3fe60d5dabd5428ad65b7617b30a.jpg

dressing (bread, onion, celery, wild boar sausage, pecans, granny smith apple, herbs, butter and stock)

sour cherry pie

chocolate/caramel tart

a green veggie (since everyone else seems to always bring root veg)

pear cider

 

My friends are signed up to bring:

Cranberries Three Ways (one of which is Ocean Spray in a can -- woot!)

Dutch Potato Casserole (sort of a mashed/dressing combo - apparently very Western PA)

Brussels Sprouts with bacon

Barton's Kamikaze Casserole (a mix of 4 or 5 different roasted root veg, spicy and very very good)

Candied Sweet Potatoes - no marshmallows!

Rolls -- both the soft gooey white grocery store variety and also the fabulous bakery sourdough variety

Corn casserole

Mushrooms stuffed with crab/herbs/breadcrumbs

Mashed Potatoes

Frangiapane tart with fruit

a LOT of wine.

 

That all sounds fantastic!  That turkey is hilarious - alien baby, indeed!  Your stock is gorgeous😍!  The Dutch Potato Casserole sounds very much like what I've heard called Potato Fillling.  I tasted it once at a fire house fundraising supper in PA and fell in love.  Carb on carb is my kind of erotica LOL.  It sounds like a wonderful mix of a feast - traditional and new, ordinary and exotic.  Just perfect for the day! 

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