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Duvel

Tales from the Fragrant Harbour

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Thank you for this blog.  I really enjoyed reading about life and food so different from what I am used to.

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6 hours ago, KennethT said:

I loved the wonton noodle soup in HK... we had it every day for breakfast!

 

Ditto that!  I highly recommend it as the first Hong Kong meal for any visitors - a long walk and a bowl of wonton noodle soup are the perfect antidote to jet lag.....well, maybe a nap, too :D!

 

Thank you so much for this week's tour, @Duvel -  your photos and descriptions really made everything come alive! 

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Enjoyed your foodblog so much - thank you!  I'll be coming back to your blog again when I start planning my own trip to HK.  Cheers!

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It's over already? Bummer.

 

Thank you for sharing. 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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I deeply appreciate the time and effort you put into this blog.

 

take a rest.

 

hopefully a short one

 

well ....

 

Ive got time next week of your FH II

 

batteries in the Wheel-Mouse are Good To Go!


Edited by rotuts (log)
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I'd like to add my word of thanks also.   Very entertaining and enlightening at the same time.

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Thank you so much for this blog!  I have a work friend who was born and raised in Hong Kong (and is there right now), so it was timely as well as fascinating!  She is so not into food, so your take on everything added so much to the things I've learned from her.  Again, thank you!

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To complete our week in Honk Kong I believe I still owe you one last dinner. Since we started in Japan I found it only fitting to also finish with a Japanese meal (after all, it is my favorite cuisine and hugely popular in HK as well). In order to get to the restaurant I need to cross the Victoria Harbor to Kowloon via the "original" mode of transportation - the Star Ferry.

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Most of these ferries are old - this one has almost 60 years of service.

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The restaurant I was heading for is called "Gyu Kaku", a Japanese chain specializing in Yakiniku ;)

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Before the battle ... from left to right: Garlic with salt, Tare and spicy Miso.

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Starter: Tofu with Onsen egg and chili oil ...

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Chicken thigh ...

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Harami, Kalbi and Hongalbi ...

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Pork cheek with Miso ...

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Oysters with butter ...

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Chicken livers ...

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Getting ready ...

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Different Kalbi ...

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Wagyu tongue ...

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And Wagyu fillet - this was incredible. You just put is for a couple of seconds just to melt the fat. Dipped into egg with soy sauce :D

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Making progress ...

 

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Of course there was also some drinks ... Dassai 39 - fantastic sake !

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Whisky highball ...

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Anyone up for seconds ? Miso-marinated Kalbi ...

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And steak with garlic butter ...

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The restaurant is located next to the harbor front, so ...

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... on the way back from the restaurant the full skyline of Central unfolded!

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Edited by Duvel (log)
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Somewhere in the background you can hear Jim Morrison singing "This is the end ..."

 

Thank you all so much for following my week of food in Hong Kong and for your kind words. I hope I could give you an idea how the culinary life is on this side of the planet - from the very basic to the more exotic. I very much appreciated your interest and all your questions and hope that - with a lot of help from other members (especially @liuzhou) - I could answer them to your expectations. Always feel free to drop more questions, either in this blog or via PM  ;)

 

I am looking forward to the next eGullet foodblog :D

 


Edited by Duvel Too much "very much" (log)
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And that's what I call gilding the lily and I loved it.  What an amazing meal to end an amazing blog. And I shall now slink off and eat my humble BLT.

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17 minutes ago, IowaDee said:

And that's what I call gilding the lily and I loved it.  What an amazing meal to end an amazing blog. And I shall now slink off and eat my humble BLT.

 

I'd go for a humble BLT anytime. I am afraid that after this week of indulgence my future will rather feature this than any sandwich O.o

 

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1 hour ago, Duvel said:

Of course there was also some drinks ... Dassai 39 - fantastic sake !

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As much as I enjoyed the harbor view, I really need a tokkuri.

 

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Nowadays glass is very popular in Japan, especially those one where you can add ice cubes into a indentation - for keeping the sake cold. I find them very pretty. I think in the last 5 meals or so that I had in Japan, all tokkuris were made from glass, and 4 out of 5 were with indentation.

 

That being said, stoneware or china are probably more traditional. I have both and like them for the warm sake in winter ...

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As if I didn't have enough destinations on my "list", I now need to add another.

Thanks for an enticing taste of Hong Kong !

 

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I also will add one more big thanks !

 

was the sake cold ?

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

I also will add one more big thanks !

 

was the sake cold ?

Yup ... very :P

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I m nota Sake Connoisseur  by any means.

 

but I like it cold too.  Very Cold ? Beets me.

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2 hours ago, rotuts said:

I m nota Sake Connoisseur  by any means.

 

but I like it cold too.  Very Cold ? Beets me.

 

Hmm...may try carbonating.  Fizzy sake could be the next big thing.

 

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