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What Wine Are You Drinking Today?


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  • 3 weeks later...

We just had some delicious Pinot Noir from Grivot (2014). It's only a Bourgogne appellation, but it delivers a good deal of complexity. It feels more like a Vosne-Romanée (village level).

 

What have you been having during this holidays? We opened a couple of grower Champagnes with low dosage. We are starting to grow more and more fond of them.

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  • 4 weeks later...
19 hours ago, Orbit said:

I'm having a Domaine William Fevre Chablis (2018), and it's fabulous.

 

I've had several of their Chablis bottlings. Good stuff, indeed.

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Tonight, with shrimp and andouille gumbo, is Michigan's own Green Bird Dry Riesling.

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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  • 3 weeks later...

Last night I enjoyed a bottle of Mandili Mtsvane 2016.  I purchased a case a couple years ago.  I noticed on the rear label that total production was 1000 bottles.  It struck me that I was consuming a non-negligible amount of dedicated Georgian women's work.

 

Mtsvane is a highly oxidized orange wine, aged in clay qvevri.

 

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16 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Last night I enjoyed a bottle of Mandili Mtsvane 2016.  I purchased a case a couple years ago.  I noticed on the rear label that total production was 1000 bottles.  It struck me that I was consuming a non-negligible amount of dedicated Georgian women's work.

 

Mtsvane is a highly oxidized orange wine, aged in clay qvevri.

 

 

Does that mean it's made from oranges? If so, I'm floored!

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On 2/20/2021 at 6:26 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

It means it's made from oxidized grapes.

 

 

Fascinating.  Is oxidation induced late fermentation, or in the bottle?  Any sherry or Madeira qualities?

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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22 minutes ago, paul o' vendange said:

 

Fascinating.  Is oxidation induced late fermentation, or in the bottle?  Any sherry or Madeira qualities?

 

It is a typical Georgian qvevri wine.  Qvevri are large underground clay vats.  Think of a huge amphora.  I'd say the taste is reminiscent of a light Madeira.  Georgian wine is not fortified.  The color is pretty.  Orange, not Madeira brown.

 

Georgian red wines are made in Qvevri too.

 

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Orange wines are not put through a long ageing process, but they do become more complex with time. Try Radikon or Gravner, probably the best out there. With 10 years they become unbelievably good.

 

On 2/20/2021 at 9:29 PM, Orbit said:

 

Does that mean it's made from oranges? If so, I'm floored!

The name orange comes from the amber colour it develops during the fermentation. White grapes are left to macerate with their skins, which leach their colour (and tannins!) to the juice.

All red wines are produced like this too. If skin contact is reduced in reds, it can yield lighter wines or rosés.

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There's a wine bar in the East Village (Ruffian) that focuses on wines from lesser known places...I've sipped some rather interesting wines here.

 

Here's a wine which we just had (at home) the other night...

 

IMG_3618.thumb.JPG.839a6a92f0e17e26254c110c15fa7629.JPG

 

Not orange,  but aged in vats, and quite tasty if you like minerals, apricots, and a bit of funk.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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7 hours ago, weinoo said:

There's a wine bar in the East Village (Ruffian) that focuses on wines from lesser known places...I've sipped some rather interesting wines here.

 

Here's a wine which we just had (at home) the other night...

 

IMG_3618.thumb.JPG.839a6a92f0e17e26254c110c15fa7629.JPG

 

Not orange,  but aged in vats, and quite tasty if you like minerals, apricots, and a bit of funk.

Sounds interesting.    We love condrieu with cheese, and are on the prowl for other viogniers "less cher".    How do you think this would work?    How did you drink it, with food or sipping?

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eGullet member #80.

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1 hour ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Sounds interesting.    We love condrieu with cheese, and are on the prowl for other viogniers "less cher".    How do you think this would work?    How did you drink it, with food or sipping?

Very interested as well, sounds delicious.  Viognier can be such an imp, but the right marriage is wonderful.  Funk note is interesting.  Love it in farmhouse ciders (Normandy), saison and touches in certain British ales done traditionally and on cask.  Can’t say I’ve picked it up in a wine, and it’s presence especially in a viognier would be great interesting.  Thanks, @weinoo.

 

@JoNorvelleWalker, very cool.  Brewer very interested in traditional methods (British ales).  My wife is Estonian and she loves their version of sahtis, runoff in spruce boughs and very open to “good” infections during fermentation.

 

Before Covid, for an anthropology course my son was taking, I helped him put together a best guess on late kingdom Egyptian beer.  Mash “brick” is fermented on mash in a clay pot, as well.  Would  be interesting to follow the thread on the process you describe.  

 

So - mad for French (Pinot) burgundies, always on the hunt for the rare price break at better appellations, or solid wines at village or regional cru.  Always up for new or undiscovered Willamette Valley as well.  Back in 2005 my wife won the national fellowship to attend IPNC - nice.  Ample time with Martine Saulnier, Riedel, tons of extraordinary makers, tons of great wine. I ran our restaurant.  I’ve never gotten over the jealousy.😂

 

So if anyone has ideas....🥳

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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  • 1 month later...

It's a sad day in the wine world.  Pio Boffa, owner of Pio Cesare passed away today due to complications from COVID at only 66 yo.  My wife interviewed him last year, and at the time he was very excited to pass the baton to his daughter who had just graduated from college...  he had a fascinating story...

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/fear-death-quickly-propelled-great-barolo-wine-producer-cathrine-todd/?fbclid=IwAR1yu9ItOs85LdnKzhJKBNjgxnKP9soh057GrAk-qCc0_haMB9mHnO0auhE

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  • 4 weeks later...
47 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

That's not wine, you know?

But perhaps if you have consumed enough of it you don’t notice?

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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57 minutes ago, Anna N said:

But perhaps if you have consumed enough of it you don’t notice?


If I get my hands on a bottle of Taketsuru 21, I‘ll be posting it everywhere I can as well 😜

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These two were drank with dessert last night...

 

image.thumb.png.0a9d63811fe6ff73ed8ea88539875865.png

 

image.png.b463b0e8c0ae159700c2442914910567.png

 

The Madeira, in particular, was quite delicious. The Coteaux wasn't bad either. Lovely to see some wines with age on them in an NYC restaurant.  Not that easy to find at this price point.  (Man, we missed going out!)

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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31 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

The Madeira, in particular, was quite delicious. The Coteaux wasn't bad either. Lovely to see some wines with age on them in an NYC restaurant.  Not that easy to find at this price point.  (Man, we missed going out!)

Where did you go?

That wasn't chicken

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