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Elissa

Coleslaw

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Here's my recipe for an Asian-style cabbage and pepper salad.

Asian style coleslaw

This is similar to my coleslaw, except my dressing is a lot less complex - usually just rice vinegar and canola oil, with a little sesame oil for flavor. Yours looks much better; I'll try the next time I make slaw.

Well, that's the official version. If I don't have all the ingredients, I use what I have. The hoisin is essential, though, I think.

JAZ that looks great, Hoison sauce you say....

I have definitely got to give that a try! anything with hoison has got to be good, I like the idea of add chicken to it, sort of makes it a whole meal!


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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anyone have a recipe for coleslaw made with jicama? coleslaw is one of those foods that i don't even like to see other people eat. . . in fact i don't like pork bbq because of the association there... (in virginia this is much too big a deal btw...)

BUT.. i love jicama slaw. it does not qualify as colesalw for me, it is something more ethereal....

Like you, Timo, I adore jicama slaw. Not sure if I have a recipe, however; as slaws are pretty forgiving, I just wing it when putting one together.

Celery root "slaw" is another winner . . .

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Here's my recipe for an Asian-style cabbage and pepper salad.

Asian style coleslaw

thank you that's exactly what i sought!


Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons: That is all there is to distinguish us from the other Animals.

-Beaumarchais

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tried draining half and half white and red. the water was electric blue and tossing it has me a little wistful. now the cabbage is floppy a day later.

picked up plum and hoisin and sesame oil and learned that i haven't the first clue how to use them in concert. must be in the wrist... what is hoisin?

roughly chopped almonds and roasted with a drop of ses oil. that sizzle plus cilantro made it good.


Edited by lissome (log)

Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons: That is all there is to distinguish us from the other Animals.

-Beaumarchais

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I use a mayonaisse and lime dressing. I also use a ngoc mam, siraccha, and lime dressing.

pleasee elaborate:

i'd guess that ngoc mam is a sweet sauce? and siraccha chilis?

also, i notice that there's no mayo thread. when i attempt it i use david's provincial france. how do you do it?

and is that lime zest?


Edited by lissome (log)

Drinking when we are not thirsty and making love at all seasons: That is all there is to distinguish us from the other Animals.

-Beaumarchais

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Similar to Jinmyo's lime & mayo combination -- I use lemons, and that makes all the difference.

Shredded cabbage plus diced cucumber, green pepper, and onion

In the dressing, the ratio is juice of at least two lemons to a half-cup of mayonnaise. Add a tablespoon of olive oil if it's too acidic for your taste. Finish off with lots of fresh-ground pepper!

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I have two different coleslaws that I make, one creamy, one Asian Style.

creamy

Asian

The kids tend to like the creamy one, the adults the Asian one. They're both good. I make these quite often for summer bbq's


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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This is an old thread but at least it keeps the topic items together.

 

I usually make John Besh's coleslaw for our annual pig roast and people love it.  It has sweet pickle relish as an ingredient. 

Today I substituted @Shelby's Cowboy Candy for the relish which turned out great.

For those of you who have CC on hand, here's the recipe.  It makes quite a lot so you may want to 1/2....half a recipe yielded 1 litre (4 cups) of slaw.

 

1 small head of green cabbage, shredded

1 white onion, minced

1 carrot, shredded

1 cup mayo (I usually make mine from scratch....makes a big difference....I use the 3 minute mayo trick from the Food Lab)

1/4 cup cider vinegar

1/4 cup sweet pickle relish or COWBOY CANDY

1/4 cup white sugar

1 Tablespoon Creole Mustard (makes a difference if you can find it or have it)

1/2 teaspoon celery salt

salt and lots of black pepper to taste.

 

Mix up the dressing and then mix in the veggies.  

 

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Here's our go-to coleslaw.    

1 2# green cabbage, sliced very thin with coarse ribs removed

1 medium onion, halved and thinly sliced

2T chopped parsley

2 cups 4% cottage cheerse

1/2 cup mayo

1T  lemon juice

1 teasp.salt

1/2 teasp. freshly ground pepper.

 

I often add a tablespoon of sour cream.

Mix all together well and allow to mellow about an hour in fridge.   

 

This recipe was written up ?somewhere? as "Men's favorite salad".    Has always been a winner in our house.

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eGullet member #80.

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Mine is Mr. Ron's from Acme or Shoprite.  The best I have ever found including my family's.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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For a creamy slaw, I'm rather fond of Bobby Flay's recipe.  I like that the onion is grated so it adds flavor but you don't bite into big chunks of them.  I usually add a good dose of celery seeds, too.

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John Besh uses minced white onion also.  I agree...it provides a back ground flavour and not in your face onion.

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Posted (edited)

What I love about cole slaw is that if you have a good variety of condiments on hand all you really need is cabbage. I don't have a favorite cole slaw; Asian style, simple vinaigrette, slaws with mayo, all good and all useful. Two things I find wrong with many recipes for creamy slaws is the heavy handed use of mayo. Not only is the ratio of mayo to the rest of the ingredients often way too high, but most recipes make a quantity of dressing that would overwhelm one head of cabbage. And the instructions would make you believe you are supposed to use it all. Well, maybe we Americans just can't get enough mayo. The fact is that once you dress shredded cabbage the quantity tends to shrink, especially if you let it sit for any length of time before eating.The second thing that is so wrong is the addition of raisins. I am confident I don't need to elaborate on that. 

 

Salting the shredded cabbage at least an hour or two ahead really improves the final result. I layer cabbage and liberal shakes of salt in a colander, then put a bowl of water on top to weight it down a bit. Before assembly I press out excess moisture  in a towel. Enough of the salt dilutes or drains out but usually enough remains so I don't need to add more salt.

 

Remember that 70's recipe (at least I remember it that way) for Asian style slaw with broken ramen noodles? Still sort of fun, but only if you don't add the noodles more than ten minutes ahead of time, unless of course you prefer them soggy. Oh yeah, slivered almonds, etc. Potluck staple.

 

I meant to say something about cowboy candy. I often make either candied jalapeños or just regular pickled ones. I like either of them in some slaws and also in potato salad. Cowboy candy is especially fun in a mustardy slaw along with a spicy sausage or hot dog. 


Edited by Katie Meadow (log)
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In my homemade coleslaw, I confess l use the "Angel Hair" shredded cabbage from the grocery store. The cabbage is sliced quite thin and makes the slaw less "chewy". ;)

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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9 minutes ago, TdeV said:

@Shelby, what is Cowboy Candy?

It's addictive.  Basically it's candied jalapeños.  The recipe I use has cider vinegar, mustard seed, sugar, turmeric, cayenne, celery seed and garlic powder.

 

Good over cream cheese eaten with crackers.  Good on ribs.  Just plain good.

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1 hour ago, TdeV said:

@Shelby, what is Cowboy Candy?

So glad you asked.  I was thinking, everybody knows this.

 

On it.  

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I like all kinds of slaw.  When I eat finely shredded slaw I think it's my favorite.  Then I eat sliced slaw and decide that's the best!  I have tried the salting and decided I don't like that.  I find that it makes the cabbage less crisp.  

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For me coleslaw begins with ken-cut cabbage:

 

Coleslaw06122019.png

 

 

Ken-cut cabbage is not only aesthetically pleasing but is possible for me to masticate.  My favored dressing is Hellmann's, cider vinegar, and pressed garlic.  Personally I've never seen the attraction of pre-salting cabbage.

 

And now if you'll excuse me I am off to have coleslaw with baked potato and grilled bluefish.

 

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On 6/11/2019 at 11:43 AM, Katie Meadow said:

Salting the shredded cabbage at least an hour or two ahead really improves the final result. I layer cabbage and liberal shakes of salt in a colander, then put a bowl of water on top to weight it down a bit. Before assembly I press out excess moisture  in a towel. Enough of the salt dilutes or drains out but usually enough remains so I don't need to add more salt.

Yes.

On 6/11/2019 at 5:53 PM, Kim Shook said:

I have tried the salting and decided I don't like that.  I find that it makes the cabbage less crisp.  

 

Huh - it help the cabbage reabosrb the dressing and crisp up, no?

On 6/12/2019 at 1:17 AM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

  Personally I've never seen the attraction of pre-salting cabbage.

That's because you use a fancy schmancy knife!

 

And, no jewish cole slaw or NY deli cole slaw ever had onions I'm aware of!

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I don't think salting makes the cabbage less crisp, exactly--it still retains a pleasing bite --but it makes it less raw and absorbs some flavor as well. And with respect to onion, I totally agree: none is just right. When other people tell me I'm too opinionated I don't really agree, but in fact I am.

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Ain't we all?

IMG_6764.thumb.JPG.f26f679d4e39231d1e4e1ffc27db35f3.JPG

 

All this talk meant I had to make some slaw last night.  Cabbage, one carrot, salted for 2 hours and squeezed. 

Apple cider vinegar, olive oil, a smidgen of mayo, celery seed, mustard seed, black pepper. Not bad.

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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On 6/11/2019 at 11:43 AM, Katie Meadow said:

.The second thing that is so wrong is the addition of raisins. I am confident I don't need to elaborate on that. 

 

 

 

Finding a raisin in any food is like finding a cockaroach, but without the crunch.

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1 hour ago, gfweb said:

 

Finding a raisin in any food is like finding a cockaroach, but without the crunch.

 

 

You've obviously never tried cockroach fried rice in rural Thailand!

 

Although, I will admit to preferring raisins.

 

BTW, I know it was a typo, but I like "cockaroach". I might borrow it!

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