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Snacking while eGulleting... (Part 3)


Toliver
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Went to the British and Irish store and picked up a few things, amongst them a jar of Branston pickles.  Looking forward to trying them.  I figure I'll put some of the Double Gloucester cheese on a cracker and put a blob of the pickle on top.  Not much different from putting Brie on a cracker and topping it with a pepper jelly.

20220730_163458.jpg

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11 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Went to the British and Irish store and picked up a few things, amongst them a jar of Branston pickles.  Looking forward to trying them.  I figure I'll put some of the Double Gloucester cheese on a cracker and put a blob of the pickle on top.  Not much different from putting Brie on a cracker and topping it with a pepper jelly.

20220730_163458.jpg

Always have Bird's custard powder on hand for Nanaimo Bars (at Christmas) or a quick and easy trifle with any kind of cake and any kind of fruit. Good stuff!

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Wow! I didn't expect my Branston Pickle to attract so much attention.

 

Growing up in Britain, Branston pickle was a daily condiment. Particularly with cheese or ham. Essential in a 'ploughman's lunch'. That was the original recipe, then the only recipe.

A few days ago I came across it here in China and as I haven't had it in about 30 years, decided to buy some. I could only get the small chunks version. Would have preferred the original.

It tastes just as I remembered it. I don't think it is sweeter than the original and from their website and the ingredients list on the jar, it seems to be exactly the same apart from the cut of the vegetable component.


I don't know what American 'sweet pickle' is so I'll leave that aside.

 

One thing: it appears that the version sold in the USA uses high-fructose corn syrup in place of the sugar used elsewhere. Don't know why.

 

Scrubbed that. It appears to be false.

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

Wow! I didn't expect my Branston Pickle to attract so much attention.

 

Growing up in Britain, Branston pickle was a daily condiment. Particularly with cheese or ham. Essential in a 'ploughman's lunch'. That was the original recipe, then the only recipe.

A few days ago I came across it here in China and as I haven't had it in about 30 years, decided to buy some. I could only get the small chunks version. Would have preferred the original.

It tastes just as I remembered it. I don't think it is sweeter than the original and from their website and the ingredients list on the jar, it seems to be exactly the same apart from the cut of the vegetable component.
I don't know what American 'sweet pickle' is so I'll leave that aside.

 

One thing: it appears that the version sold in the USA uses high-fructose corn syrup inplace of the sugar used elsewhere. Don't know why.

You really don't need to acquaint yourself with American sweet pickle.   No, you don't.  

Perhaps you can understand if I say that Branston has structure and balance.

eGullet member #80.

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2 hours ago, liuzhou said:

It appears that the version sold in the USA uses high-fructose corn syrup inplace of the the sugar used elsewhere.

I checked what I bought and it uses sugar.  No mention of high-fructose corn syrup.  Mine was maufactured in England.

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45 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

I checked what I bought and it uses sugar.  No mention of high-fructose corn syrup.  Mine was maufactured in England.

 

It's all manufactured in England.

 

The corn syrup story seems to be incorrect. One website claimed it and wikipedia picked up on it.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Trauma alert for gardeners in the Northern hemisphere

I bought some zucchini this week. 
 

5137C583-C6F7-4DB5-BA12-B415FEC55132.thumb.jpeg.654b80f7ac7bb5f2140adefd2d024d7e.jpeg

Salted them for about an hour and then sautéed in some nice olive oil. Might have benefitted from a dipping sauce of some sort but that was not going to happen. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

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@Anna N 

 

Excellent !

 

you made those Zuuk's  proud !

 

should you have interest in

 

Eggplant , 

 

just take a break , 

 

until you let that pass.

 

 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, rotuts said:

just take a break , 

Just swallowed a double dose of Gravol. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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6 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

You PAID for zucchini?  

 

So did I yesterday. Can't garden now and no friends with vegetable gardens. 

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49 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

You PAID for zucchini?  

Mea culpa. Knew I would raise somebody’s ire!  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Late dinner is Branston Pickle, English Cheddar, and suitably stale bread.  I took pause when I perused the Branston ingredients, but at least no corn syrup in mine.  I am used to sharper, more assertive Vermont Cheddar and I think Vermont Cheddar would have served better as accompaniment to the Branston than the English.

 

Branston certainly is addicting.

 

 

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker
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While passing the refrigerator, I heard the German (souse) head cheese calling,    I relieved a slice.   (Retrieved?) 

I love this stuff.    Straight, in a sandwich, cut up in a brisk vinaigrette. 

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4 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

While passing the refrigerator, I heard the German (souse) head cheese calling,    I relieved a slice.   (Retrieved?) 

I love this stuff.    Straight, in a sandwich, cut up in a brisk vinaigrette. 

 

Me too.  But, I prefer the pickled headcheese which I can't find anywhere anymore.  My mother used to make it.  I was maybe 10 or so when the first pig's head arrived at our home.  For a 10-year old, seeing this, it was slightly traumatic.

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

 

Me too.  But, I prefer the pickled headcheese which I can't find anywhere anymore.  My mother used to make it.  I was maybe 10 or so when the first pig's head arrived at our home.  For a 10-year old, seeing this, it was slightly traumatic.

When I was a toddler, my father thought it was amusing to share his jar of Wilson's pickled pigs feet with me.    I thought they were on a par with chocolate ice cream.   Today, in France, I order "museau", sliced pig's snout in vinaigrette and herbs.    Can't find it here.  But most deli counters have (maybe Boarshead) sour (German style) headcheese.    Any port in a storm.

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5 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

When I was a toddler, my father thought it was amusing to share his jar of Wilson's pickled pigs feet with me.    I thought they were on a par with chocolate ice cream.   Today, in France, I order "museau", sliced pig's snout in vinaigrette and herbs.    Can't find it here.  But most deli counters have (maybe Boarshead) sour (German style) headcheese.    Any port in a storm.

 

Funny because more than once I used to see the pickled feet in huge glass jars not so long ago. Maybe when Smart & Final catered more to the restaurant trade - maybe Mexican restos? Also at some gas stations. Here - Los Angeles. 

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I find them (pickled pigs feet) in the deli case at local Italian delis.    Decent, but none as piquant as those of my childhood nor musseau in France.    To sing, these need a pucker to balance the fat.

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59 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I find them (pickled pigs feet) in the deli case at local Italian delis.    Decent, but none as piquant as those of my childhood nor musseau in France.    To sing, these need a pucker to balance the fat.

Not having eaten them or wanted to I can't comment on flavor. Stepmother made Sultze sometimes - kinda loose not compressed. but I was not tempted. Give me some cow's foot soup Latin style and comfort sets in.

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4 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

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Plain Greek yogurt, raw honey, and Cornflakes because we’re out of granola.  Balancing with a neutral is brilliant.

A genius move!   Honey is sweet!    Granola is sweet!   Balancing with a neutral  carb is brilliant.

Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)
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A couple of weeks ago I bought this Scottish oatmeal.  I know people don't think of eating oatmeal as "snacking" but I eat it mid-morning while catching up on eGullet.  As an oatmeal fan, this is the best I have ever had.  It is flavourful and, other oatmeal can't compare to its creaminess.  If you like oatmeal and can find it, I highly recommend it.

 

20220730_163407.jpg

Edited by ElsieD (log)
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