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DianaM

The Bread Topic (2016-)

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I found my manual:  "How to Enjoy Your Home Bakery Traditional".  Oh for the lost days of full size, full color operating instructions that one can read.

 

And I must apologize, I misspoke, there is a dough setting.  Inexplicably the dough setting includes a 20 minute preheat.  Which is probably why I never used it.  But on the Home Made setting the preheat may be turned off.  Even though -- like it or not -- the heat is on during kneading, as the Zojiushi thumbs its nose at you.

 

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If it's not one thing it's another.

 

Bread11142019.png

 

 

Tonight's loaf is baked from frozen dough, from a double batch before.  A few moments into baking the CSO started beeping and shut down.  Thankfully I have a spare.

 

Meanwhile the Zojirushi has been reconsigned to utter darkness in the bedroom.  I began to remember why I stopped using it.

 

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I'm more concerned with the CSO. Did you determine it was dead?

 


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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1 hour ago, kayb said:

I'm more concerned with the CSO. Did you determine it was dead?

 

 

Decalcifying now.  May need to preform the @Shelby maneuver.

 

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21 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Decalcifying now.  May need to preform the @Shelby maneuver.

 

I hope it works!  I'd say if it makes it through the decalcify process then you're good to go.  It's when it won't get finish that process that it might need the de-gunking.

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6 hours ago, Shelby said:

I hope it works!  I'd say if it makes it through the decalcify process then you're good to go.  It's when it won't get finish that process that it might need the de-gunking.

 

We made it through decalcification.  I think the problem is flora or fauna living in the tank this time of year.

 

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Another bread today and we are then good for a week or more 😙. This was done with the same method of last week bread. Made with a 100% biga for 18 hours (50% KA bread flour, 35% KA all-purpose and 15% KA whole wheat sprouted) 70% hydration. Very happy with how the crust turned out and the taste. 

188BE507-EE3F-4B74-BC61-0726B2834F79.jpeg

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4600EF17-F325-4989-B211-7CAEA9738A75.jpeg

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On 11/15/2019 at 5:45 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

We made it through decalcification.  I think the problem is flora or fauna living in the tank this time of year.

 

 

If that's the case, I'd recommend filling the reservoir with a solution of hydrogen peroxide and water, and cycling it through the steam cycle until you've pretty much cleared everything out. Can you take the (internal) tank out to wash/scrub it out? I've never tried.

 


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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11 minutes ago, kayb said:

 

If that's the case, I'd recommend filling the reservoir with a solution of hydrogen peroxide and water, and cycling it through the steam cycle until you've pretty much cleared everything out. Can you take the (internal) tank out to wash/scrub it out? I've never tried.

 

 

I'd be more inclined to break out the spare CSO and return the problem unit under warrantee.  I think it is a design mistake to make the water reservoir out of clear plastic.  But as I said, the decalcification went fine, so maybe we will be OK for a while.

 

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Pain de Mie for my eldest grandson's lunch sandwiches at school - he doesn't like to eat the school dinners. Daft boy!

 

My wife and I walked up with it to his home, and there were two first for us;

 

(1) eldest grandson (5 years old) read us a book for the first time, and

 

(2) youngest grandson (1year old) walked for 14 steps for the first time.

 

Two very proud grandparents...

 

 

Pain de Mie 2, 17-11-19....jpg

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Can anyone give me, or point me to, a recipe for cheese bread?  I would like to make some where the cheese is visible in the bread perhaps by cutting it into something like 1/4" pieces rather than using grated cheese.  I would like to use aged cheddar for this.

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23 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

Can anyone give me, or point me to, a recipe for cheese bread?  I would like to make some where the cheese is visible in the bread perhaps by cutting it into something like 1/4" pieces rather than using grated cheese.  I would like to use aged cheddar for this.

When I was making cheese bread the only way I found to have visible cheese was to cut it into about quarter inch cubes but then knead  it into the dough by hand. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

When I was making cheese bread the only way I found to have visible cheese was to cut it into about quarter inch cubes but then knead  it into the dough by hand. 

 

I wonder if I could just use a regular white bread recipe, and if I do, would I have to make any adjustments?  I would cube the cheese as you suggest, possibly cutting back on the salt is the cheese is salty?

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Pepperoni al taglio from Mastering Pizza. I made a half recipe in a quarter sheet pan.  Dough was 50% bread flour and 50% whole grain, stone ground Glenn wheat.

IMG_1578.thumb.jpeg.2751afabeb3461ad284c8bed62ee07d3.jpeg

 

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And a pile-o-pita.  The dough was 50% bread flour and 50% a whole grain, stone ground blend of Sonora and Red Fife.  Recipe from Shaya

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Edited to add that it's now 86°F outside and the oven has been turned OFF!


Edited by blue_dolphin weather (log)
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53 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

I wonder if I could just use a regular white bread recipe, and if I do, would I have to make any adjustments?  I would cube the cheese as you suggest, possibly cutting back on the salt is the cheese is salty?

I am sure this  is the recipe I used. I did the cheese in cubes rather than shredded although I think I added some shredded also. Anyway it should give you a starting point. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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When I was watching them make the cheese bread at the local Sobey's - they make the dough (standard pan de mei style or I used  potato bread) - then after the first rise when they are rolling the loaf, they add the grated cheese into the roll and on the top.

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Here is a loaf of cheese bread I made today using @Anna N's recipe she linked to above.  I made the dough in the bread machine and added the cheese when the "add add-ins" buzzer sounded.  When I did that, I knew I was going against Anna's instruction to knead the cheese cubes in by hand but I decided that I wanted to know what effect it would have.  As you can see, the warmth of the machine softened the cheese to the point where it pretty much blended it in.  The bread is delicious, very, very cheesy.  We have both had several slices and John declared it was one of the best loaves of bread he has ever had.  I can't wait to try it toasted.  Next time, though, I'm going to make the dough in the bread machine and then knead the cheese in by hand.  It will be interesting to see how they compare.  Oh, I used an aged supermarket cheddar, Kraft I think.

20191118_140923.jpg


Edited by ElsieD (log)
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All is not bread and roses...

 

Bread11192019.png

 

 

My first loaves mixed in the Ankarsrum.  Oops.  For the same weight of dough the loaves were significantly larger.  The boule baked itself into the roof of the CSO and was difficult to extract.

 

 

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Tonight's baguette crumb was tighter than I would have liked yet more creamy yellow -- but neither gummy nor cottony.  Very good flavor.  Perfect for my work sandwich later on this morning.  Nonetheless so far the best loves I've made recently were the boules whose dough I've vacuum sealed and frozen.  I do not understand this.  I'm sure Zorro would.

 

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5 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

All is not bread and roses...

 

Bread11192019.png

 

 

My first loaves mixed in the Ankarsrum.  Oops.  For the same weight of dough the loaves were significantly larger.  The boule baked itself into the roof of the CSO and was difficult to extract.

 

 

 

Like undesrable mold on cheese - just cut the burned bits off :)i

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Baked in the 3-pound bread machine.  2 cups bread flour, 2 cups white whole wheat flour, 4 tablespoons whole milk powder, 1 1/2 teaspoons SAF Instant Premium Yeast, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 1/2 teaspoons salt.  1/4 cup vegetable oil, 1 1/2 cups warm water.

The loaf rose till it just touched the lid and then shrunk slightly so that it did bake completely  on the #1, White bread setting.

 

The only thing I did was after the last "knock-down" brief knead,  I removed the dough from the pan, extracted the beaters,  replaced the dough and allowed the cycle to complete.

 

 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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5 minutes ago, andiesenji said:

The only thing I did was after the last "knock-down" brief knead,  I removed the dough from the pan, extracted the beaters,  replaced the dough and allowed the cycle to complete.

 

I know you've posted this trick before, but it bears reiteration anyway. I think it's a great idea.

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