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DianaM

The Bread Topic (2016-)

315 posts in this topic

@kayb

 

 I do not have a CSO. I have a Breville XL.   The CSO  you have seen me mention is in the townhouse in  Manitoulin. 


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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One of the few times I fire up the big oven (the little one is not high enough for the job). I usually bake 2 loaves and freeze 1, but this time I decided to make a few sesame and onion rolls instead of the second loaf of sandwich bread.

HC

IMG_1996.JPG

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Challah for the jewish new year's dinner. I used my usual challah recipe, but added raisins, subbed the honey for sugar (at a slightly increased amount). I've also shaped the loaf to a round shape, which is the custom for the new year's.

 

20161001_185004.jpg20161001_200532.jpg20161001_204846.jpg

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~ Shai N.

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DSC01702.jpgDSC01703.jpgDSC01704.jpg

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More bread. Bread flour, WW flour, pumpernickel, and semolina. It's a yeast bread, with a few tablespoons of starter for good measure. 

Rustic Bread sliced.JPG

Rustic bread2.JPG

Rustic bread cut open.JPG

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On 9/29/2016 at 0:29 PM, Anna N said:

@kayb

 

 I do not have a CSO. I have a Breville XL.   The CSO  you have seen me mention is in the townhouse in  Manitoulin. 

Ah. My apologies.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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28 minutes ago, kayb said:

Ah. My apologies.

 Apology totally unnecessary. It's confusing trying to figure out where I am and what I have.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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57% whole meal rye loaf with a little yogurt, caraway, and malt syrup at 82% hydration. 2 days of rest in the fridge. Twice baked on a baking steel with steam: Preheated to 240dC, lowered to 220dC and baked for a total of 45 minutes. Chilled for almost un hour and baked a second time for 15 minutes at 180dC with convection fan on.

My shaping was a little loss, as I'm not used to working with sticky rye dough and wanted to hasten before it will stick to everything in sight. This only costed me with a few tunnels in the loaf - I can live with that.

Crust is thin and crisp, darker then seems in the pictures, perhaps a tad to dark, as it is a tad bitter at the edges. Crumb is a little dense and very moist, very tender and creamy, very little chew. Tastes woody, earthy, a little sweet, only a hint of the caraway.

20161022_192745.jpg20161022_192832.jpg20161022_201012_1.jpg

 


Edited by shain (log)
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~ Shai N.

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I never heard of twice-baking bread. What does this do?

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image.jpeg

 

I am very proud of this not because it's great bread since I haven't even tried it yet but because it's great math!   This is the pain de mie from Della Fattoria.  That recipe is designed for the much larger pan and I had to do the math to reduce all the ingredients so they would fit my 9 x 4 Pullman pan. Did I ever tell you that I suck at math?

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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21 minutes ago, Anna N said:

image.jpeg

 

I am very proud of this not because it's great bread since I haven't even tried it yet but because it's great math!   This is the pain de mie from Della Fattoria.  That recipe is designed for the much larger pan and I had to do the math to reduce all the ingredients so they would fit my 9 x 4 Pullman pan. Did I ever tell you that I suck at math?

Please let us know how it tastes, and if it's great we'd like to try the recipe!

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2 hours ago, cakewalk said:

I never heard of twice-baking bread. What does this do?

 

It helps the crust stay crisp. With any bread, the crust gets softer as steam is leaving the cooling bread. So after it is cool, the second bake dehydrates the crust back to crispness, but the interior doesn't have enough time to get too hot, and so very little steam escapes. The convection fan helps to dehydrate it even faster.


Edited by shain (log)
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~ Shai N.

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20 hours ago, lindag said:

Please let us know how it tastes, and if it's great we'd like to try the recipe!

image.jpeg

 

Nice tight crumb.  Next time I will up the salt.  For anyone who has the book and wants to make a smaller loaf in the 9 x 4 x 4 pullman pan:

 

390g flour

8g (or more) salt

6g sugar

25g extra virgin olive oil

5g instant yeast

290g water

I added a little more flour than the above when I felt it was a little too loose, perhaps a tablespoon or so.

 

 

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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11 minutes ago, Anna N said:

image.jpeg

 

Nice tight crumb.  Next time I will up the salt.  For anyone who has the book and wants to make a smaller loaf in the 9 x 4 x 4 pullman pan:

 

390g flour

8g (or more) salt

6g sugar

25g extra virgin olive oil

5g instant yeast

290g water

I added a little more flour than the above when I felt it was a little too loose, perhaps a tablespoon or so.

 

 

 

Anna, how much flour did the original recipe call for? I have the larger pullman pan (I think it's 13 inches long).


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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@MelissaH

630g

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Anna,

Did you like the bread well enough to make the recipe again?

I'm thinking I might try this one using my new Platinum Yeast because I really want to try it out and see if it's worth using.

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1 minute ago, lindag said:

Anna,

Did you like the bread well enough to make the recipe again?

I'm thinking I might try this one using my new Platinum Yeast because I really want to try it out and see if it's worth using.

I did. I just felt it needed more salt for my taste and I would like to make it with some other flours replacing some of the A/P.  


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Some great looking breads.

 

I hadn't baked in a couple of weeks and had depleted the bread in the freezer. 

 

And Moe was starting to whine about eating store bought bread.

 

So I made a 1500g batch of dough at 80% hydration on Monday and left it in the fridge

until late Wednesday afternoon.  

 

Baked 6 baguettes and one large pizza.

Baguettes_dough_October_24th,_baked_October_26th,_2016_1.jpg

 

Baguettes dough October 24th, baked October 26th, 2016 2.jpg

 

Pizza October 26th, 2016.jpg

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image.jpeg

 This is the wheat and barley pullman loaf from Della Fattoria.  It calls for something I did not have which is instant barley but gave me the option of using oats instead. 

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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image.jpeg

 

I am not sure if I have posted about this bread before but I am becoming very fond of it.   It is very straightforward and uses whole wheat and rye flour and no white flour at all yet the crumb remains quite soft. It calls for 100g of seeds leaving the assortment up to the baker. This time I used sesame, flax, pumpkin and sunflower. The recipe is from Felicity Cloake's The A-Z of Eating.  I baked it in a Pullman pan but did not put the lid on. 

 

Next I am going to attempt the unspeakable and convert a recipe that uses a sourdough starter to one that uses just yeast. And to add insult to injury it is one of the recipes from Keller's Bouchon Bakery book.  ( I wonder if there is a bakers protection program similar to the witness protection program.)

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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On 11/2/2016 at 2:57 PM, Anna N said:

Next I am going to attempt the unspeakable and convert a recipe that uses a sourdough starter to one that uses just yeast. And to add insult to injury it is one of the recipes from Keller's Bouchon Bakery book.  ( I wonder if there is a bakers protection program similar to the witness protection program.)

 

At the risk of starting an unhappy discussion, why do you want to make the conversion?  Flavor, convenience, or something else altogether?

 

Edited to add: I am NOT trying to start an argument; I have no dog in this fight and I hope that no argument ensues.  I'm just curious.


Edited by Smithy Clarity (log)
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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

 

At the risk of starting an unhappy discussion, why do you want to make the conversion?  Flavor, convenience, or something else altogether?

 

Edited to add: I am NOT trying to start an argument; I have no dog in this fight and I hope that no argument ensues.  I'm just curious.

 

Simple answer -- sourdough starters defeat me!  No good telling me how easy it is, no good pointing me to this method or that method. I am sourdough challenged and have no further interest in flogging a dead starter. I have limited physical resources, limited energy reserves but a strong desire to make good bread.  I am quite prepared to leave perfect bread to others. xDxD

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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18 hours ago, Anna N said:

Simple answer -- sourdough starters defeat me!  No good telling me how easy it is, no good pointing me to this method or that method. I am sourdough challenged and have no further interest in flogging a dead starter. I have limited physical resources, limited energy reserves but a strong desire to make good bread.  I am quite prepared to leave perfect bread to others. xDxD

I've started several with no luck. I keep trying though.

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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3 minutes ago, chileheadmike said:

I've started several with no luck. I keep trying though.

 

That makes three of us.  I had success once, and that was that.  It refuses to co-operate.  I stick to yeast.

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