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What Are You Preserving, and How Are You Doing It? (2016–)


Anna N
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4 minutes ago, Jacksoup said:

This was half of today’s haul.

Gorgeous photograph!   Wondered if I was really on a food board or if somehow I’d stumbled into the Louvre!  

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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On 12/4/2021 at 7:05 AM, lemniscate said:

I did also get some super ripe prickly pears off a neighbors patch and steam juiced them for syrup.  Steam juicing is the easiest/safest way to handle these evil fruit.  Paid back the neighbor with prickly pear flavored bottle of vodka.  They liked it.  

 

 

I wish I was your neighbour!!!  😀

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On 12/8/2021 at 8:40 PM, Jacksoup said:

I used to have access to an enormous amount of Meyer lemons.  I zested them, juiced them and froze both.  Still had too many and freezer was well stocked.  I tried dehydrating them and use them in tea, water and things like chicken piccata.  My relationship with the source ended, but now my friends that I have gifted with the dried lemons are on the lookout for lemons for me.  This was half of today’s haul.  I have a small cheap 5 tray dehydrator so I expect to to be going full blast for a week.

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What an awesome idea with the dried lemons for tea! Is the taste pretty much the same as with a slice of fresh lemon? 

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That is a good idea. Dehydrating lemons or Meyer lemons. I don't have a big load but my tree produced 18 this year. Some still green. I've only picked a few so far. Froze two and one went in my cranberry sauce. Last year only three but I studied and found out I needed to hand pollinate. 

 

 

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24 minutes ago, lemniscate said:

 

I did a big jar last season, but then I turned it into paste, which I find is much more versatile to use.

 

 

 

I have two jars of preserved lemons that I bought one day on a whim.  I have never used preserved lemon in anything (not sure why I bought them) but the recipe for the pie via your link intrigues me.  When you pulverize the lemon, do you include the skin?  How salty are these things?

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I make preserved lemons and other citrus every year and consider them a pantry staple. 

 

46 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

I have two jars of preserved lemons that I bought one day on a whim.  I have never used preserved lemon in anything (not sure why I bought them) but the recipe for the pie via your link intrigues me.  When you pulverize the lemon, do you include the skin?  How salty are these things?

 

They are generally very salty as the preservation relies on the level of salt (and the acid) to deter the growth of any wee nasties. I only purchased them once and they were a bit less salty than the ones I make myself.  

I usually make up a small jar of a purée for seasoning but most often I use just the rind:  rinse the lemon, remove the pulp and cut into dice or julienne.  They look like little jewels!  

 

There's a recipe for preserved lemon aioli in Alon Shaya's book, Shaya, that is absolutely fantastic.  In the book, he uses it on crab cakes but it's delicious with all sorts of seafood and vegetables. Recipe online here.  That book also has a great preserved lemon vinaigrette.

Preserved lemon hummus is great.  I use a recipe from The Moosewood Restaurant Table

I've made a couple of compound butters with preserved lemon.  One with capers from Zuni Cafe Cookbook and another from Prune. The latter recipe is available online here. I freeze it in logs so it's easy to cut off a disk to put on vegetables, broiled fish or seafood. 

They are excellent in rice/grain pilafs or salads.  The Yellow Indian Woman Bean Salad with Bulgar and Preserved Lemon from Heirloom Beans and the New Leaf Pilaf from This Will Make It Taste Good are fine examples.  Also in the latter book is Collards Break Character that includes preserved lime (lemon would work fine), green curry paste and coconut milk.  Really delicious but watch the salt as both the citrus and the curry paste can add up. 

Fans of the dirty Martini may like to add a little preserved lemon brine instead of olive juice.  In This Will Make It Taste Good, Vivian makes a Margarita with Salt on the Inside by making a simple syrup with preserved lemon.  

I've got this recipe for preserved lemon ice cream on my Ninja Creami list but haven't made it yet. 

 

Edited by blue_dolphin
correction (log)
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45 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

I have two jars of preserved lemons that I bought one day on a whim.  I have never used preserved lemon in anything (not sure why I bought them) but the recipe for the pie via your link intrigues me.  When you pulverize the lemon, do you include the skin?  How salty are these things?

 

Yes, I pulverize all of it, but I did try to pick out the seeds.  It is very salty.  I would advise use the paste *in place of* salt in recipes, not along with.  It's salty, tangy, and deeply lemon, which does include the slightly bitter component.   Salad dressings would be a good entry point to test with, or homemade mayo, or a dip.  

 

I have used it in bbq sauces, marinades, stews, dressings, pasta sauces, tartar sauce....etc.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, lemniscate said:

 

Yes, I pulverize all of it, but I did try to pick out the seeds.  It is very salty.  I would advise use the paste *in place of* salt in recipes, not along with.  It's salty, tangy, and deeply lemon, which does include the slightly bitter component.   Salad dressings would be a good entry point to test with, or homemade mayo, or a dip.  

 

I have used it in bbq sauces, marinades, stews, dressings, pasta sauces, tartar sauce....etc.

 

 

 

Thank you for your suggestions.   I wonder what it would be like without the peel?  I "think" that should reduce the bitter component?  How long does it keep for in the fridge?

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5 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

Thank you for your suggestions.   I wonder what it would be like without the peel?  I "think" that should reduce the bitter component?  How long does it keep for in the fridge?

 

The rind is the part that preserved lemons are made for.  The pulp is secondary and sometimes discarded.  I didn't see the point of that and just blended it all up to use.  I would suggest trying what you have with the rind as it is and see if you think its bitter (or not) for you tastes.   It's very soft and a tiny piece will show you the flavor.

 

Mine keeps for years in the fridge in a mason jar.   

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  • 3 weeks later...

I've had a huge bowl full of Granny Smith apples sitting around for a while.   I thought I didn't like that variety in apple butter, but I made it anyway.  I was wrong.  Really good.  I upped the brown sugar amount a bit.  Has a hint of tart.  Made the house smell wonderful--I did it overnight in the slow cooker.

 

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I'll also post this here...I suppose it can be considered preserving because of the Morton's Tender Quick.....

 

Wanted to play around with making venison bologna.

 

2 lbs venison burger

2 TB Morton's Quick and Tender

2 1\2 t. ground black pepper

1\2 t. garlic powder

1\2 t. liquid smoke

1\4 cup of water

 

I hand mixed that all together and let it rest in the fridge over night.  After contemplating while not being able to sleep, I decided to give the meat a whiz in the food processor.  I like the texture that happens when you do that.  

 

Formed into logs and baked for about 45 mins at 300F in the CSO--aiming for internal temp of 155 or so.  

 

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I'm pleased.  

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12 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I've had a huge bowl full of Granny Smith apples sitting around for a while.   I thought I didn't like that variety in apple butter, but I made it anyway.  I was wrong.  Really good.  I upped the brown sugar amount a bit.  Has a hint of tart.  Made the house smell wonderful--I did it overnight in the slow cooker.

 

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Thanks for the idea as I have some past crisp Granny Smiths. I was gonna pitch them into the field for the critters but this sounds like a better plan + it will smell good.

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On 1/10/2022 at 10:16 AM, Shelby said:

I've had a huge bowl full of Granny Smith apples sitting around for a while.   I thought I didn't like that variety in apple butter, but I made it anyway.  I was wrong.  Really good.  I upped the brown sugar amount a bit.  Has a hint of tart.  Made the house smell wonderful--I did it overnight in the slow cooker.

 

thumbnail_IMG_1751.jpg.7e2327585c0a1fbb36881f1993555d0e.jpg

 

I'll also post this here...I suppose it can be considered preserving because of the Morton's Tender Quick.....

 

Wanted to play around with making venison bologna.

 

2 lbs venison burger

2 TB Morton's Quick and Tender

2 1\2 t. ground black pepper

1\2 t. garlic powder

1\2 t. liquid smoke

1\4 cup of water

 

I hand mixed that all together and let it rest in the fridge over night.  After contemplating while not being able to sleep, I decided to give the meat a whiz in the food processor.  I like the texture that happens when you do that.  

 

Formed into logs and baked for about 45 mins at 300F in the CSO--aiming for internal temp of 155 or so.  

 

thumbnail_IMG_1749.jpg.d1bc6528b598a81ddd998b992ee5964f.jpg

 

thumbnail_IMG_1750.jpg.13fd6081aecd9455a6fa2f40403ff875.jpg

 

I'm pleased.  

Further adventures with venison bologna.

 

Ronnie made me a press :) .  Helps with those holes you can see in the slices.

 

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Same recipe as above except I added a bit more black pepper.  Next time I'm definitely adding some whole mustard seed.

 

 

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58 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Further adventures with venison bologna.

 

Ronnie made me a press :) .  Helps with those holes you can see in the slices.

 

thumbnail_IMG_1778.jpg.14b035e0639527ef0477afca832d3eca.jpg

 

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I recognize that long brown handle with the pusher. Gotta love a guy who'll sacrifice part of his rifle cleaning kit to make a meat press!

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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40 minutes ago, heidih said:

Ronnie +PVC rule :)

He says thanks :) 

18 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

I recognize that long brown handle with the pusher. Gotta love a guy who'll sacrifice part of his rifle cleaning kit to make a meat press!

🤣  I cannot tell you how much he is impressed that you know what that is!!!!!

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/30/2017 at 1:27 PM, Okanagancook said:

I tasted my commercial onion powder after reading about using it more often to enhance flavours.  It tasted vaguely of onion. >:(  So I decided to dry some onions sliced to 1/4 inch for about 4 to 5 hours at 155F.  They were then processed to a powder in my spice grinder.  Unbelievable taste.  The jar is right next to my salt. :D


Thank you so much for mentioning this in another thread when I was complaining about harsh-tasting onion powder. Since I don’t have a dehydrator and was using the dehydrator setting on my oven, I just did one onion to test it out. I used the 1/8” julienne setting on my Oxo slicer, spread them out on parchment, put them into the oven at 140F for ~ 4 hrs and powdered them in my whirly blade spice grinder. 
Holy cow!  That stuff tastes sweet and oniony - nothing like the jar in my cupboard!  Now that stuff was likely past its prime but I’m sure it never tasted that good, even when it was fresh. 
 

I put 2 more onions in the oven for now. Once I see how long it lasts, I can easily scale up. 

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2 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:


Thank you so much for mentioning this in another thread when I was complaining about harsh-tasting onion powder. Since I don’t have a dehydrator and was using the dehydrator setting on my oven, I just did one onion to test it out. I used the 1/8” julienne setting on my Oxo slicer, spread them out on parchment, put them into the oven at 140F for ~ 4 hrs and powdered them in my whirly blade spice grinder. 
Holy cow!  That stuff tastes sweet and oniony - nothing like the jar in my cupboard!  Now that stuff was likely past its prime but I’m sure it never tasted that good, even when it was fresh. 
 

I put 2 more onions in the oven for now. Once I see how long it lasts, I can easily scale up. 

 

I wonder if this would work with garlic.

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