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rotuts

Know Your Cuts of Meat : this is ....

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What cut of meat is this :

 

Meat Cut.jpg

 

this is not a trick question.  this 'cut' was on sale, and i plan to make Swiss Steak out of it later today.

 

My mother preferred gardening to cooking, yet we had a home-made dinner and breakfast most days.

 

sometimes we went out to Kirks, a fantastic single hamburger place in Palo Alto.

 

as you can see , although on Sale, its going to be a bit dry.  Im trying to mimic my mothers SS.

 

gravy and mashed potatoes and something green will fix this up nicely.

 

not so much the Green part, but the rests.

 

so where on the Cow does this come from, and what should it properly be called.

 

BTW  David Letterman had a seg. from time to time called Know Your Cuts of Meat.

 

I won so many times Im having a bit of Angina right now !

 

unfortunately I was never picked, nor ever on the show

 

:sad:   therefore  no angina    :biggrin:


Edited by rotuts (log)

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Well it's not a blade steak which is what Amer. Test. Kitchen recommended, but then they're always recommending cuts of meat which have never turned up in So. Jersey.  The last time I made Swiss Steak I ended up with a cut of meat the butcher at the Williamstown Amish Market said should work.  It didn't but I ate it any way. 

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"A fool", he said, "would have swallowed it". Samuel Johnson

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the SS part was an addendum.  the part my mother would have appreciated was the "Sale" part

 

I think she generally used Round, probably the top as its larger.  on sale of course.   its hard=wired in my genome, I guess.

 

these were the days in the '50's that supermarkets first appeared.  in my area it was called  " All American "

 

back then the meat market w real butchers distinguished them selves w their Hamburger, freshly ground.

 

you pick your Cut of Meat  ( a hunk of Chuck w your fatty preferences right there in from of you ) rang the buzzer and the butcher

 

came right out and ground that Hunk right in front of you.

 

times change.

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Gotta agree with Norm, looks like round to me. 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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fair enough   

 

so what what;s the difference between Round  ( which im very familiar with including in the OId Days when you got a huge slab w the bone right there :  i.e. the leg )

 

and the rump   is the rump the gluteal muscle of the cow ?

 

this was billed in the circular as a " petite sirloin '  the pic looked tasty  ( canned pic )

 

the in the display pic it was called rump sirloin.

 

any way, its what I wanted to try to duplicate my mothers SS.

 

one time go its going to be

 

thanks

 

still    I never see " rump' in the meat case.

 

no big deal

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I think it is sirloin, possibly top sirloin, select grade, lots of flavor but inclined to be slightly tough.

 

My mom would make a fast Swiss steak with sirloin or round, not well marbled at all.

 

The meat would be seasoned with a thick layer of AP flour, while the pan heated up.  That was a thick bottom Wear Ever aluminum, with a few 

warps from excessive heat over the years.

 

The steak, whole or in chunks, was pan fried quickly in a bit of beef tallow, and the sauce thickened when the meat was medium. There was enough flour on the meat to thicken a nice pan gravy. 

 

Any leftovers could be reheated in a braise, but mom's fans (dad and two boys), liked the quick minute steak best. 

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thank you

 

nice

 

jayt90

 

in my house there were never any left overs

 

My mother did indeed make a lot of Mashed Potatoes

 

In the MixMaster   they were delicous

 

if there were any left  

 

a bit unlikely

 

they were saved and made into the next nights Potato Pancakes :

 

add milkm butter  then shape and  sauté.

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nope

 

Kirks was only in palo Alto  on El Calmino

 

hover there id this :

 

http://www.kirks-steakburgers.com/

 

that being said

 

If the Burgers are Good

 

well then they are Good

 

the Kirks sold the place  and then there was  Kirks in the Shopping Center called then Arastrodero

 

it OK  better than other  buggers by a long shot

 

but lets review 

 

that sort of burger  from the ' late '50's 

 

you need to make at home

 

no ambiance  like that of the '50's

 

but you  might make your own,

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Identifying retail cuts, especially from photographs is very tricky.  I would go with the round or rump suggestion from Norm. :)

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yep

 

that's it

 

3 " minimum  cuts from Lobels

 

never having won   nor selected  nor visited

 

Im still here

 

can you imagine what That Box Costs   Now and Then ?

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For what it is worth, "round" in beef butcher's speak is the whole hind leg, which is comprised of the top round, outside round/silverside, eye of round, knuckle/bottom round and then the shank & gooseneck. The tri-tip wraps around the knuckle and the culotte or top sirloin cap covers the the top sirloin (which is part of the loin).  

 

It would appear to be a cross cut from the end of the top sirloin (after the "Y" shaped silverskin that make it less desirable than the striploin and a bit more difficult to butcher), with the heart of top sirloin (very tender) at the bottom which the French call "langue de chat" (cat's tongue).

 

http://bovine.unl.edu/main/index.php?lang=English&what=crossections&primal_id=966278019&crossec_id=966285542&crossec=F

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BTW, Rotuts, I love the tip of  the hat to that old Letterman bit in the title

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