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Darienne

Curried soups - So delicious

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In my long years of life, never before have I had or made a curried soup. 

 

I found a recipe which appealed to me in a free vegetarian magazine distributed by our local bulk and health food store:  Alive  .  I bring it home to read every time I go in there, although mostly to see what recipes might appeal to me...and most don't I have to admit.  It's not that I don't like vegetarian food, which I do, but this is just a tad 'too' healthy for me usually.

 

But this recipe was for a "Spicy Thai Yam and Lentil Soup" and I made it for lunch today.  I have to admit that I did add shredded pork leftover from the last Puerco Pibil.  If the recipe is traditionally Thai I have no idea, but adding pork from the Yucatan region certainly did not add to its authenticity.

 

It was a huge success and now I am definitely in the market for curried soup recipes. 

 

All regional cuisines are welcome.  :rolleyes:

 

Just found the recipe online:  http://www.alive.com/recipes/view/1563/spicy_thai_yam_and_lentil_soup


Edited by Darienne (log)
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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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The term "curried" or "curry" is an Anglo-Saxon construct, by the way.

 

Nevertheless, I think it might be worthwhile for you to look into the use of spices that would go into a dish from one of the "Asian cuisines" such as in the Indian subcontinent or SE Asia or Central or Western Asia to transform a braise or soup or whatnot.  Mexican/Central American spicing would also fall under this rubric.  But surely you have done some of these before?  A "curried" soup really amounts to something not dissimilar from a diluted "curry" - using the Anglo-Saxon terminology, in my view - although there are various nuances that may be applied, of course.  Many of them are quite delicious, of course.

 

The term "curry" is an Anglicized bastardization of the Tamil "kari" which refers to a saucy dish of a certain type.  If one dined out in India or Pakistan one would seldom see the word "curry" except in Western-oriented places.  Each dish would have its own name which in itself incorporated a linkage to what was in the dish - but the word "curry" would not usually appear.

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Thai red curry paste + coconut milk + pumpkin/butternut squash/sweet potato/carrot is one of my favourite soup combinations. With extra fish sauce.

 

Or try laksa!  There's lots of different kinds, but the ones I've had were Malaysian (more yellow curry-ish) and Singaporean (more coconut milky).  Both are delicious.  Sorry, I don't have a recipe, but googling brings up lots. I'm lazy, so I will use a package of laksa paste.  Or go out for it.

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I make my toor dal pretty soupy, does that count? It's always a smash hit around my house

 

mustard seed, cumin, fenugreek seed

 

onion garlic ginger peeled roasted green chilis tomato paste cayenne and turmeric, fenugreek leaves

 

water

 

red lentils

 

vinegar, salt

 

Surely you can figure out the rest?

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My papa, now 94 and living in the retirement home (which he calls "Mortuary Manor") has been a big fan of what we traditionally think as "curry" ever since his many years of living in SE Asia.  He is never without his little can of  S&B curry powder.  He sprinkles it on many things, certainly including soup.  I actually remember my first taste of somebody else's oyster stew.  Seemed so bland.  Took me quite a while to realize that I was accustomed to my father's oyster stew dusted with the ubiquitous curry powder.  Ditto potato soup. Cream of Asparagus or cauliflower or cream of anything. Crab chowder. And every single egg dish he ever made.  

 

Even today, in Mortuary Manor, when Dad goes into the dining room and sits down to eat whatever institutional food the cooks decide to sling his way, he's got his trusty can of curry powder in his pocket.

 

So that's my advice. 

 

Obviously it's always good to look for "recipes."  But you can also keep some curry powder (homemade or storebought) or garam masala right by your kitchen stove.

 

And sprinkle some into anything that seems likely.


Edited by Jaymes (log)
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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Thanks Jaymes.  Actually, that's exactly what DH does.  If he doesn't like something served...he douses it with curry powder.  Especially if it's Brussels Sprouts which I love.

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I like the addition of curry powder to a butternut and green apple soup. It's pretty 2005-ish in food trends though.

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Julia Child's cream of onion soup has a bit of curry powder to it. Really nice touch- everyone likes that simple recipe.

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I have a Weight Watchers recipe called Slow Cooker South Indian Lentil Stew that might fit your bill.  It's a dead-easy crockpot or stovetop simmer: throw the stuff in and let it go; garnish with lemon and (optional) cilantro just before serving.  Would this be of interest?  

 

South Indian stew elements.jpg

 

South Indian stew - simmering.jpg

 

Southeast Indian Lentil Stew and fresh bread.jpg

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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This sounds good, Nancy.  Googled it and found the recipe toute suite.  Any changes that you make to the recipe?  Thanks.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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This sounds good, Nancy.  Googled it and found the recipe toute suite.  Any changes that you make to the recipe?  Thanks.

I adjust the seasonings slightly:

1 Tbsp cumin instead of their 1/2 tsp cumin (we really like cumin);

1 tsp coriander powder instead of 1/2 tsp;

hot paprika instead of cayenne, but no quantity adjustment;

1 - 2 tsp salt instead of 1 Tbsp for others' salt sensitivity (but I add more to my own at the table).

Spicy heat note: I think it's pretty spicy, probably due to the mustard seed and/or curry powder, and usually cut the heat in my bowl with a bit of dairy: lebneh, yogurt or maybe sour cream. My DH doesn't think the heat needs cutting.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I just posted my version of a Molly Wizenberg recipe for curried lentil soup here.

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 ... Shel


 

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I really love curried anything, including soups. My only issue is that all 'curry powders' and 'curry pastes' are not the same.

 

There are many brands and none of them taste very fresh to me any more. I got spoiled when I started to make my own - which also vary, but intentionally (unless I cannot find some ingredient locally and have to make do or just leave it out) just as they would in each home in Thailand or India I suspect, much less in each region of those countries. Because of that I find I cannot actually use recipes for curry soups or anything any more if they specify storebought versions - particularly if they do not list a brand to buy. I have to wing it - if it tastes good, it works.

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Thanks Shel.  I've printed out your recipe.

 

Nancy, we really like Cumin too.  Really.  And I'll probably go for the cayenne.  I thought the Thai curried soup was pretty hot while I was making it (and tasting it) and then I added the coconut milk and that changed it greatly.  DH thought it was really as hot as he thought it would be and asked for more heat.  We're eating it tomorrow and besides putting an amount of chickpeas in it (to make me happy), I shall also add to the curry paste to make him happy. 

 

ps.  Just googled Lentilles de Puy.  Don't know where I could get them in my area.  I'll just have to use plain old green lentils.


Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Thanks Shel.  I've printed out your recipe.

 

Nancy, we really like Cumin too.  Really.  And I'll probably go for the cayenne. 

 

ps.  Just googled Lentilles de Puy.  Don't know where I could get them in my area.  I'll just have to use plain old green lentils.

 

Have you ever tried Aleppo pepper?  Ever since friends brought me a big bag from Turkey last year, I've not looked back, and can't recall when I last used cayenne.  The peppers can be ordered from Penzeys and The Spice House, amongst other places on line.

 

Green lentils are often Lentilles du Puy.  For example

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 ... Shel


 

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Shel_B, thanks for the reminder: I too am a fan of Aleppo Pepper, and sometimes use that in place of cayenne.

 

Darienne, the recipe is very forgiving.  I don't usually have green lentils, but instead use a blend of orange lentils, brown lentils, yellow lentils, brown or white tepary beans....  It doesn't seem to matter whether they come from a Native American source or the Indian portion of our grocery store, as long as they're roughly the same size and will cook at about the same rate.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Shel.  According to David Lebovitz, only lentils marked Lentilles de Puy are the real thing and that they cost much more than the plain ole green lentils which I am accustomed to buying.

 

http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2006/11/cheap-caviar-1/

 

I see I misread the package note I linked to.  It said French Style ... oh, well, duped again by the copywriters <LOL>


 ... Shel


 

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I can't imagine that I could buy Lentilles de Puy in our small city and I also can't imagine that they would fit into our snack bracket.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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A few months ago I bought some lentils labeled as "black caviar" for $3/lb at Central Market in the bulk aisle. From France but these are tiny tiny lentils and fairly sure they are not Lentilles de Puy... The smallest I've ever seen and indeed about the size of small black roe. Tasty but you gotta be extra careful cooking as they are even more delicate than your regular lentil.

 

Supposedly make a fine addition to soup.

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Have you ever tried Aleppo pepper?  Ever since friends brought me a big bag from Turkey last year, I've not looked back, and can't recall when I last used cayenne.  The peppers can be ordered from Penzeys and The Spice House, amongst other places on line.

 

Green lentils are often Lentilles du Puy.  For example

I agree about the Aleppo pepper. I buy mine at a Mediterranean market in Dallas. It it very reasonably priced and seems nice and fresh. I always adorn my pizza with a generous quantity.

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Really nice recipe.  I am equally like Thai food but likes to venture something spicier.  I tried this recipe called Pat Thai (Thai fried noodles) and you may want to take a look at it.  Delicious.

 

http://goo.gl/mwuvtn

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My name is KP Kwan. I am a pharmacist turned restaurateur who lives in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I have worked in my restaurant more than ten years and since year 2012.

 

I am also a food blogger.  You can read my blog at http://tasteasianfood.com/

I am looking forward to learning and contributing topics about culinary skills in this forum.

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