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Dave W

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About Dave W

  • Birthday 01/13/1981

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  • Location
    Colorado

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  1. Scratch Guacamole - Labor Intensive

    Tableside guacamole is less tasty than guacamole that has been marrying in the fridge for hours.
  2. Scratch Guacamole - Labor Intensive

    Charge more, hire more employees.
  3. I have a stovetop griddle that's made of carbon steel and is 24" x 13" and it's not big enough for some big griddle projects (eg pancakes for company). It's heavy and plenty stable due to weight and my stoves continuous grate design. A nominal 12" integrated griddle does not add any appreciable functionality to a stovetop and it costs two burners of space. Two large skillets on two burners will get you almost as much cooking space as it would. Griddles are easy to clean with scraping and heat but cleaning isn't the issue, the issue is real estate.
  4. I realize my post was more a review of my ARPS than an answer to the question in OP. I think the best way to shop for stoves is feature set and size above all. Feature set will impact your enjoyment of using it. Size can be driven by design or by volume requirements but a 30" is big enough for most families. I only use 5 or 6 burners on my 36" a couple times a year. Dont get a 12" integrated griddle.
  5. 36" probably overkill but I got an American Range performer that size with 3 25K , 2 18k and one 12k open burners, a convection oven big enough for a full sheet pan with 6" to spare that takes 45 minutes to heat up, and a "1800 degree" ceramic broiler. It's pure joy to cook on. I've never been disappointed. Cooking on it is like driving my 4Runner in the snow.
  6. Dinner 2017 (Part 6)

    Boneless skinless. A little marinade I use with balsamic, lawrys seasoned salt, and garlic powder.
  7. Dinner 2017 (Part 6)

    Grilled b/s chicken thigh, melts yellow American cheese, pickled jalapeños, white hamburger buns. Sublime
  8. Just get in the habit of washing some things as you go. Hot pans rinse and wipe out very quickly and self-dry or can be put back into circulation rather than getting crusty in the sink. Similarly, blenders and food processors get clean very quickly right away with a quick rinse but take a scrub or dishwasher session if left to dry before washing. Work on mise en place so you only have to wash cutting boards and knives once. These should go go a long way towards lightening the load.
  9. Chorizo Burger Temp

    Pasteurization times for 150F is quick. 165f chicken is not necessary. Nothing wrong with well done when dealing with chuck and fatty chorizo. Or, make the chorizo into a sauce.
  10. Sous Vide Garlic

    Yeah this
  11. Too-thin porkchops

    I understand there is almost zero incidence of trichinae in the US commercial pork supply. To OP, with such thin chops I would slice, velvet then cook in a stir fry.
  12. Can we talk a little more about the egg bites? I just bought 12 half pint jars to make these for next week. I'm reading that 68F is a desirable temperature. Once pasteurized what's the shelf life for these in sealed mason jars at 35F?
  13. Bangers and mash

    Cumberland sausage, onion gravy, mash. Hard to beat. Who knows if Costco bangers are authentic. Called bangers because of large rusk content causing them to split easily during cooking.
  14. Costco's mechanically tenderized meat

    But what about the problem with conventionally cooked steaks not pasteurizing the interior either? The issue isn't sous vide.
  15. Costco's mechanically tenderized meat

    Yes I understand what blade tenderizing means. That's what I meant when I said it doesn't matter if the meat is minced when you pasteurize it, because you can pasteurize to the core as paulraphael also notes.
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