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Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 4)


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Three more arrived today: a remaindered (at $6.99) copy of the Reader's Digest Cookies that was originally $35, The San Francisco Ferry Plaza Farmers' Market Cookbook, and The Gourmet Potluck by Beth Hensperger whose bread books I've liked.

Judy Amster

Cookbook Specialist and Consultant

amsterjudy@gmail.com

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It appears that someone has "run off" with my copy of The Whole Beast: Nose to Tail Eating by Fergus Henderson. Please deduct one from the list until I replace it or find the bastage who took it!! :angry:

:biggrin:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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It appears that someone has "run off" with my copy of The Whole Beast: Nose to Tail Eating by Fergus Henderson.  Please deduct one from the list until I replace it or find the bastage who took it!! :angry:

:biggrin:

=R=

Are you sure it's not lurking under your bed? I have quite a nice stash there!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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It appears that someone has "run off" with my copy of The Whole Beast: Nose to Tail Eating by Fergus Henderson.  Please deduct one from the list until I replace it or find the bastage who took it!! :angry:

:biggrin:

=R=

Are you sure it's not lurking under your bed? I have quite a nice stash there!

LOL! I looked there . . . and everywhere else for that matter. I do lend them out fairly often and I can't always remember to whom. Maybe that's the case here. If not, at least it's a relatively inexpensive paperback.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Can I count historic "cookbooks" in the form of pdf files, scans, cut-and-paste Word documents as well as "real" cookbooks?  it would be impossible as an individual to actually own many of the classic historic cookbooks (except where there are facsimiles available) of the eighteenth century and before, but I seem to have a goodly collection of electronic versions. At least they dont take up bookshelf space because there is none left in this house!

I guess I set a precedent allowed my own copy of "The Epicurean," so PDF copies of entire books are OK.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Tom Fitzmorris' New Orleans Food ordered directly from him and he was gracious enough to autograph it for me.

Culinary Mexico by Daniel Hoyer

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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For my birthday, the Les Halles cookbook - and another Jewish/kosher cookbook (simply called Jewish Cooking).  They seem to be repelling each other!

Wouldn't opposites attract? [Ducks] :laugh:

Add two for me: Jacques and Julia at Home and Food and Wine's Best of 2000. $7.00 SCORE! :raz:

"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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it would be impossible as an individual to actually own many of the classic historic cookbooks (except where there are facsimiles available) of the eighteenth century and before ...

Good point. I agree about 18th-century material though there may be some in the Dover catalog which is impressive anyway. Many 19th century classic books are available, cheap, in Dover or other facsimile editions and you can find the originals on the used market if you look for them. US classics like Eliza Leslie's books and The Virginia Housewife and UK's Mrs Beeton issued in many editions (58 for Leslie if I remember), in vast quantities, and were often printed on low-acid cloth-based paper and well bound as was the custom of the time, for working books meant to last, like tools. Some 60- to 150-year-old books I have, though well used, hold up better now than modern books 20 years old (printed on acid wood-pulp paper). Current Dover reprint cookbooks are routinely paperback but acid-free.

Link to related posting upthread.

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Two additions, one, Fonda San Miguel, a gift from an eGer and recent houseguest, which looks beautiful and is all the nicer because it is a favorite of the giver's.

Also Marcella Cucina, which I for some reason didn't get around to when it was published. I was reminded of the egregious omission when Chufi posted a pic of fava bean and lettuce soup from it, RIGHT when I have a lovely burgeoning huge crop of favas.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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Six lovely new books today: Great Grilled Cheese by Laura Werlin because I love her other cheese books, Chocolate Therapy by Kathy Farrell-Kingsley, Brownie Points by Lisa Slater because I want every brownie book, the updated From Tapas to Meze by Joanne Weir, How to Break an Egg by the editors of Fine Cooking and Tasty by Roy Finnamore which I think we'll really cook from.

Judy Amster

Cookbook Specialist and Consultant

amsterjudy@gmail.com

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I have 98.

Thinking of adding the new "The Cake Book" by Tish Boyle but I have not heard much about her work. Will probably succumb by the next visit to the bookstore. I am also looking forward to Dorie Greenspan's new book coming out later this year.

Is there a place where baking/dessert books are being discussed? I am trying to build a respectable collection of cookbooks focusing on baking/desserts.

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Around 1300. And carting them from one city to another, then one country to another makes me feel guilty for being so acquisitive. But hey, they are like my children and I couldn't part with them either! The oldest goes back to the 1700s, the newest I bought last week.

Website: http://cookingdownunder.com

Blog: http://cookingdownunder.com/blog

Twitter: @patinoz

The floggings will continue until morale improves

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Around 1300. And carting them from one city to another, then one country to another makes me feel guilty for being so acquisitive. But hey, they are like my children and I couldn't part with them either! The oldest goes back to the 1700s, the newest I bought last week.

Hi, Pat, and welcome to eGullet!

I love your blog (now bookmarked). "A bit ruff" is a hoot!

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Realizing now, thanks in part to Maggie's post, that I forgot to come here and list a few new additions:

The Reach of a Chef by Michael Ruhlman

The Nasty Bits by Anthony Bourdain

Heat by Bill Buford

My Life in France by Julia Child (with Alex Prud'homme)

Culinary Boot Camp by the CIA and Martha Rose Shulman

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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A book I found in the bargain racks of Barnes and Noble.

I recognized the author, as I have several of his books, (Siimple Fare, and Company Fare), but they are in storage now. The author is Ronald Johnson, and the new book I got is called The American Table. It seems to be a reprint.

Edited by artisan02 (log)
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Hello everyone!!!

Sorry so late to add this, I have not read the whole thread but I have 26, (very sad I know)..but I am looking to add more. (way more...!!!)

Nasty Bits will probably be on the list....and a real good chocolate cookbook...anyone have any good sugestions?

Edited by CKatCook (log)

"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"

-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

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Hello everyone!!! 

Sorry so late to add this, I have not read the whole thread but I have 26, (very sad I know)..but I am looking to add more. (way more...!!!)

Nasty Bits will probably be on the  list....and a real good chocolate cookbook...anyone have any good sugestions?

Welcome CKatCook. What sort of chocolate cookbook are you thinking? Desserts vs making actual chocolates? I quite like Chocolate Obsession for abit of both areas right now.

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:shock: This is an addiction!!!!!!!! Two more for me:

Apples for Jam, by Tessa Kiros and one that is definitely not for this season but oh, soooo beautiful: roast figs suar snow by Diana Henry

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