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Eman57

What do you put on your pancakes?

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Realized the other day while at breakfast that all pancake toppings are not created equal. Now i pose the question what do you put on your pancakes? Personaly i load up with butter and either fruit flavored syrup or jam.

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Normally I put a pat of butter and maple syrup on my pancakes. I had some the other day, though, and I put on some home-made blueberry conserve that someone had given me and it was delicious. I grew up eating pancakes sprinkled with granulated sugar, and I still occasionally eat them this way. Mostly, though, it's maple syrup and butter.

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I alternate between honey (tried it after reading about it in a novel. It's very good), maple, or jam/jelly. I tried molassis once, that was interesting. I don't like a lot of the sweet stuff on it though. Always use butter. Only use fruit or other flavored syrups if I ended up at IHOP.

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Never use butter - I honestly can't taste the difference without it and don't need the extra calories (I also don't butter toast if I'm going to use jam). Real maple syrup. Toast dope, if I have some.

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My wife's family used to top them with plain white sugar, then roll it up like a burrito - it's actually not bad. They would also sometimes wrap pancakes around chuncks of cheddar cheese - also not as bad as you would assume.

Personally, I often eat them plain. Or with just a small amount of syrup (real or fake). I LIKE butter, but try to be healthier and not add it.

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Depends: if homemade, nothing at all (not out of any sense of purity or something, I just like the way they taste plain). If out, either butter, or if available, maple syrup (NOT "maple"-flavored corn syrup!).

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I make homemade for the kids about every other weekend or so. If I eat them I just eat them plain, my anti-sweet tooth thing.

Oldest daughter loves them with peanut butter. Youngest daughter with a half a ton of syrup. Preferably the HCFS kind.

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It really varies for me. My go to is real maple syrup. Lately I have been using some recently homemade dulce de leche which has the consistency of maple syrup. Occasionally, if we have good jam or preserves we will use those as well.

Of course, the first pancake I eat warm untopped. I have to test the quality :wink:.


Edited by avaserfi (log)

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My husband makes pancakes the way I like them -- really thin, almost like crepes (Basically he doubles the amount of milk in a standard batch of batter). I'm like TheNoodleIncident's wife -- I sprinkle them with granulated sugar and cinnamon, and roll them up like a cigar. That said, I've got homemade black raspberry syrup that is also damn good on pancakes...

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In summer I take whatever soft fruit looks best, chop or purée, add sugar and heat. Right now in Philadelphia my choice would be either blue or raspberries. Or I'd pit some pie cherries which have no more than one or two weeks more before the season is over.

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In summer I take whatever soft fruit looks best, chop or purée, add sugar and heat. Right now in Philadelphia my choice would be either blue or raspberries. Or I'd pit some pie cherries which have no more than one or two weeks more before the season is over.

I love making fruit compote to top my pancakes. And I'll use whatever is on hand. If I don't have a suitable fruit, face it watermelon won't work well, I use honey or jam.

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I roll either mu shu or roast duck IN my pancakes, thank you. Hoisin is my topping of choice.

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No butter, real maple syrup. Or sliced fruit AND maple syrup. My mom, depression-era housewife that she was, used to make brown sugar syrup with butter and vanilla that was real good, as I recall, but I haven't had it in a thousand years. Would try it but low-carb diets and pancakes and syrup don't go together very often.

My dad was a big proponent of sugaring pancakes, but my favorite way of his was to spread with butter then top with a thick blanket of brown sugar. Very crunchy and sweet. Yum.

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I find maple syrup alone to be much too sweet, albeit delicious, but if I have no other options I'll use it sparingly.

I've always preferred some sort of high-quality fruit preserves, compote, or jam on my pancakes. After our one and only trip to the highly anticipated, poorly executed, and short-lived Permanent Brunch, where I had pancakes with creme fraiche and plum compote, I've since enjoyed adding creme fraiche or sour cream along with the fruit preserves or compote.

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A little butter and real maple syrup. B grade, not Fancy A. I prefer the dark, almost toasted, taste. In a pinch, strawberry preserves. I've found myself ordering or making pancakes just because I wanted maple syrup, not to mention bacon (belly or Canadian) in the syrup. Unfortunately I find restaurant pancakes too fluffy. I like them a little dense with crisp edges. Next time I might just get an order of bacon and ask for some maple syrup. And I have been known to smuggle in a little bottle of syrup if I know we're going to a place that only serves the fake stuff.

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Maple D when I can get it but its rare. or a little dark B

butter.

and sometimes I put sliced bananas in the batter.

but maple s. is rediculously expensive now.

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Ok, I'll own up to it: I like Mrs. Butterworth's.

Maple is good when we're out, or when I'm eating with the in-laws, who might mock my true preferences. If I have some appropritely loosely-set preserves on hand, I might use them, too. But when I need really soul-satisfying comfort-food pancakes, it's Mrs. Butterworth. I blame my mother (maple syrup never crossed our threshold: too expensive).

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A little butter and real maple syrup. B grade, not Fancy A. I prefer the dark, almost toasted, taste. In a pinch, strawberry preserves. I've found myself ordering or making pancakes just because I wanted maple syrup, not to mention bacon (belly or Canadian) in the syrup. Unfortunately I find restaurant pancakes too fluffy. I like them a little dense with crisp edges. Next time I might just get an order of bacon and ask for some maple syrup. And I have been known to smuggle in a little bottle of syrup if I know we're going to a place that only serves the fake stuff.

Yes. Exactly. Yes yes yes.

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And also, I really don't like adding any sort of fruit preserve/jam on top, but LOVE blueberries or bananas cooked into the pancake. I'll use even less, if any, syrup in that situation. And banana choclate chip pancakes with peanut butter on top are awesome.

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Fresh-made blueberry syrup! My husband buys a dozen pints of blueberries every June and freezes them. Then I make fresh blueberry syrup every time we have pancakes -- alternate Saturday mornings -- from about 2 cups of frozen blueberries. If there's some left over, it gets frozen for the next time. And we have a tiny freezer but he's good at cramming them in.

Second choice is real maple syrup.

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Maple syrup for regular griddle cakes. Often over crumbled crisp bacon, no butter.

Sorghum molasses mashed into soft butter for buckwheat or corn griddle cakes.

For the thinner "Swedish" pancakes or similar (not quite crepes), currant jelly, strawberry jam, etc.

For oven pancakes - Dutch Baby - puffy types, apple compote with cinnamon and sometimes mixed berry compote.

For "flannel cakes" it has to be apple butter or pumpkin butter topped with toasted pecans.

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regular 'murcan style pancakes: grated cheddar cheese or maple syrup or homemade strawberry/Gran Marnier sauce, or lots of butter w powdered sugar

dutchbabies - lemon and powdered sugar

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i grew up with molasses drizzled on both pancakes and waffles. husband grew up with "pancake syrup" on his. we have now come to the middle with one of several options:

true maple syrup grade b

use above and poach some blueberries in it

some margarine(husband can't eat butter) and toast dope

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