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Your Daily Sweets (2005-2012)


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Those look yummy! I had the same problem last time with my cinnamon rolls, I like them so cinnamony they're almost hot. I made cupcakes for my daughter's teacher's birthday. And of course I kept the extras for me...

cupcake.jpg

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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That cheesecake looks pretty tasty, Kim! I love anything key lime. I generally don't make cheesecake because I end up eating the whole thing! Safer to just order it out and only have one piece available.

Edited by Genkinaonna (log)

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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these are awesome! tarko- could your work get any more shiney?! do you polish with a microfiber or what's your secret? and richard-your desserts are heaven, if i could control what i dream about, it would be alllllll your desserts allllll the time! to the lovely cupcake bakers, they both look super fun, makes me kinda hungry :) and candadianbakin'- that espresso bit of lushiness is picture perfect :)

keep up the great work you guys!

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Cake for our daughters' 8th birthday. They ask for the same thing every year: chocolate cake, Oreo/whipped cream filling, chocolate icing. They love the little girls I make out of fondant for toppers.

Girls\

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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fantastic! they look great:O

Cake for our daughters' 8th birthday. They ask for the same thing every year: chocolate cake, Oreo/whipped cream filling, chocolate icing. They love the little girls I make out of fondant for toppers.

/Magnus - happy amateur chocolatier

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Cake for our daughters' 8th birthday. They ask for the same thing every year: chocolate cake, Oreo/whipped cream filling, chocolate icing. They love the little girls I make out of fondant for toppers.

Wonderful! And I can't believe they are 8 already!

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R-Wood -- That lemon chiffon with lemon wafers looks amazing! So summery -- any chance you could share the recipe while my raspberry bushes are providing? :-)

I will dig it out, I did have a problem with it. The curd part didn't set up like curd, so I had to put it back on the heat and add some whole eggs. Still not ideal, but with the gelatin it worked out. It was a recipe the chef gave me, and I don't think it had been tested.

The cookie is from Wente Vineyards cookbook, I got it when I worked there. It went well with the rest of the dessert. They bake weird, so don't think it's wrong.

Will post recipe soon.

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Nolnacs -- those pies are beautiful! I love the sheen you're getting on your top crust -- what do you use? Is it an egg wash? I usually do a wash with heavy cream instead, but those pies might inspire me to change my ways...

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Nolnacs -- those pies are beautiful! I love the sheen you're getting on your top crust -- what do you use? Is it an egg wash?

Actually, no. I use a milk wash (usually whole but I haven't really noticed a difference between that and 2%). I also sprinkle a healthy dose of sugar on top as well which I think helps contribute to the coloring. I prefer the look that I get with milk washes over egg washes. The milk brings out more color in the crust without looking like a separate layer on top - which is my issue with the egg wash.

Also, I'm not sure whether it makes a difference in the coloring, but my pie crusts are all lard.

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Ah yes, sweet delicious lard...any pie with pig parts is naturally going to be superior. And if it's got a smiley face on it, so much the better! I got roped into making cupcakes for a friend's church bake sale, which I enjoyed because I got to experiment with some new recipes I've been wanting to try. They are: Red velvet with cream cheese frosting, dulce de leche with caramel buttercream and a dulce de leche drizzle, cafe con leche with coffee buttercream, vanilla with vanilla bean buttercream, vanilla with chocolate buttercream, and double chocolate with chocolate buttercream. I say any day that I get to use three colors of metallic sanding sugar and sprinkles is a good day!

photo 1_fixed.jpg

If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

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Here is the lemon chiffon recipe I used. It may need more yolks or a couple of whole eggs instead as it didn't set up well. But, I did this recipe X8, so that may have affected it. And it boiled, which it wasn't supposed to do, and still didn't thicken.

Lemon Chiffon

In saucepan:

1/4 Cup Water

Sprinkle with:

1 Each Gelatin, envelope (2 1/4 tsp)

Whisk In:

1/2 Cup Water

1/2 Cup Lemon Juice

1 Tsp Lemon Zest

6+ Tbsp Sugar

4 each Egg Yolks

Stirring constantly with rubber spatula, heat mixture until it steams and coats a spoon fairly heavily. DO NOT BOIL. Immediately pour into a bowl and cool until thick but not set.

In Bowl:

2 Each Egg Whites

1/4 Cup Sugar

Beat whites to soft peak stage. Gradually add sugar. Beat until stiff and glossy.

Fold into lemon mixture.

In Bowl:

1 Cup Whipping Cream, whipped soft

Whip cream until soft peaks form. Fold into lemon mixture.

Pipe into cups or molds, chill to set

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Genkinaonna – I love the sound of all of your cupcakes!

I made an unusual cake for a coworker’s birthday today. It was called a “Golden Angel Food Cake” – a good way to use up eggs leftover from making regular angel food cake, I thought.

Out of the oven:

gallery_3331_119_164887.jpg

This baked up really pretty and was a lot lighter than I expected it to be. The recipe called for whole wheat flour and no flavoring other than some orange zest. I used regular flour, some Penzey’s dried orange peel and orange extract.

I used the extract in the 7-Minute frosting, too:

gallery_3331_119_147259.jpg

Slice:

gallery_3331_119_151610.jpg

Nice, tight crumb. This was a good cake.

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Couple of puds from a dinner party last night.

A 'predessert' verrine of rhubarb/raspberry compote with a tarragon crème anglaise:

015 (2).JPG

And a chocolate, caramel and hazelnut entremets. There are three layers of hazelnut dacquoise, a caramel crémeux and the body is a chocolate mousse. There is also a layer of chocolate covered pailleté feuilletine for texture. Although, as it happens, I had to make do with cornflakes.

006 (3).JPG

A while ago someone asked for the recipe for the chocolate glaze (I used the same glaze on something else) and I have now (obviously) refound the recipe:

870g water

720g cream

360g cocoa powder

1040g sugar

Cooked to 102C then 42g hydrated, melted gelatin added. (I let the syrup cool a bit before adding the gelatin.)

Use once cooled to 32C.

===================================================

I kept a blog during my pâtisserie training in France: Candid Cake

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they both luck fantastic:)

Couple of puds from a dinner party last night.

A 'predessert' verrine of rhubarb/raspberry compote with a tarragon crème anglaise:

And a chocolate, caramel and hazelnut entremets. There are three layers of hazelnut dacquoise, a caramel crémeux and the body is a chocolate mousse. There is also a layer of chocolate covered pailleté feuilletine for texture. Although, as it happens, I had to make do with cornflakes.

006 (3).JPG

A while ago someone asked for the recipe for the chocolate glaze (I used the same glaze on something else) and I have now (obviously) refound the recipe:

870g water

720g cream

360g cocoa powder

1040g sugar

Cooked to 102C then 42g hydrated, melted gelatin added. (I let the syrup cool a bit before adding the gelatin.)

Use once cooled to 32C.

/Magnus - happy amateur chocolatier

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Cinnamon/calvados milk & dark chocolate ganache with whole walnuts in a dark shell. Tempering was real tricky, I tried out a new chocolate - and it just wouldnt temper properly, on my 3rd try I decided to use mould anyway. The flavour turned out really nice though:)

dsc00273e.jpg

Lemon / mint ganache from Grewelings book. I used the same batch of cocolate here for the mould, thus the tempering problem - but the flavour and texture turned out really well.

dsc00272li.jpg

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Edited by tarko (log)

/Magnus - happy amateur chocolatier

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Cinnamon/calvados milk & dark chocolate ganache with whole walnuts in a dark shell. Tempering was real tricky, I tried out a new chocolate - and it just wouldnt temper properly, on my 3rd try I decided to use mould anyway. The flavour turned out really nice though:)

dsc00273e.jpg

Lemon / mint ganache from Grewelings book. I used the same batch of cocolate here for the mould, thus the tempering problem - but the flavour and texture turned out really well.

dsc00272li.jpg

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Great photography and delicious looking goodies!

edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)

"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill

Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb

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870g water

720g cream

360g cocoa powder

1040g sugar

Cooked to 102C then 42g hydrated, melted gelatin added. (I let the syrup cool a bit before adding the gelatin.)

Use once cooled to 32C.

WOuld you mind explaining a bit to me? What do you mean by 42g hydrated? Is that water for the gelatin? Any details will be gereat as I want to make a shiny glaze like that! I have tried a few times but the shine is not enough. Not a mit=rror like one anyhow.

Thanks!

Edited by Lior (log)
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Dear Lior,

I mean 42g gelatin which you then hydrate. I.e. if using powdered, the gelatin is hydrated in 210g water or if sheet, soaked and squeezed. As normal, the weight is the dehydrated weight. Is that clearer? Send a photo of whatever you make!

R

===================================================

I kept a blog during my pâtisserie training in France: Candid Cake

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i'm no fan of summer but i am fond of making cold creamy desserts. here's some from the last few months:

amaretto panna cotta with bing, lambert, & rainier cherries

HPIM9975.JPG

currant and elderflower trifle

HPIM0030.JPG

coffee mousse charlotte

DSC01238.JPG

pizzelles filled w white chocolate mousse & red currants

HPIM9930.JPG

persian lime mousse

HPIM0054(2).JPG

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